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Light Bulb Question


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I have  a few ships in light bulbs that have a feature about the bulb that I am totally unfamiliar with. On these ships in bulbs, they have what looks like the metal thread portion of the bulb intact.  I would presume that there were two bulbs used, (one that the thread was cut off of, and the other donor bulb for the new thread).  

 

I am getting ready to cut the metal thread portion off a bulb, but before I do, I wanted to know if anyone here has done this, and how it was done.

 

Thanks

Gwyl

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A number of years ago I did a tug and log boom in a light bulb. When I made the cut I tried to make the cut as straight as possible. I also kept the end so when I put it back together I could match the cut and solder it together again. I also did a lot of filling to hide the cut. I am doing another light bulb right now and am doing it the same way.

John Zuch

Courtice Ontario

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I use the 2 bulb method.  The nice think about the metal ends are they are always the same regardless of the bulb size.  I make the cut just below the top of the metal.  You should put masking tape around the bulb where and the top of the metal is to reduce glass fractures.  Remember you are cutting through the glass also so when you first get through the glass you will be removing the vacuum.  I use a 1 inch circular diamond disc in a dremel to make the cut and run it under water to keep the area cool.

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On of our members "John Green" sent this reply to my email concerning this subject.  I thought it appropriate to share with the group.

 

 

 

I have done it a couple of times successfully i used a thin diamond blade on my Dremmel. on the first bulb taped around the metal part onto the glass of the bulb. then i cut bulb and metal together leaving a 1/8inch ring held onto the glass. After the ship is bottled then i brake a bulb being careful not to mess up the metal or the base. Carefully dig out the glass portions of broken bulb. next i remove tape and ring which protected the edge of the glass. Now carefully superglue all around the cut edge of bulb and insert it into the salvaged metal base. one of my first trials cracked months later because I had only spot glued it to the base.
hope this helps.

 

Thanks for this reply John.

 

Gwyl

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when i did mine i cut the glass just above the screw. after i filled the neck with sea i tied a monkie's fist at the cut. thats when the neck of the bottle started to crack. that is why i had to keep the monkie's fist going up the neck. after, i screwed the the bulb in to the female part and fastened it to the base.

 

john z's way sounds like a good way.

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These are all good options that have been posted so far.  I do like the option that Daniel referred to below.

 

Greg Alvey posted this article.  It's a specific method for certain types of light bulbs but it's another option.  http://www.folkartinbottles.com/workshop/building-tips/71-opening-a-light-bulb

Daniel,  Thanks for posting this.  I think I am going to try this approach on the build I am using for my C30 build.  I hope to grab some muriatic acid today to start the soaking process.

 

Gwyl

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Gwyl,

Be careful when you soak it. My son used some muriatic acid to soak some rusty car parts in my garage for a few days and anything in the garage that was metal and wasn't coated/painted ended up with a rusty surface rust damage to it. Some of my hand tools took a hit. Even some bare metal on my drill press was damaged so if you soak it put it in a plastic container with a lid on it so the off gassing doesn't attack any bare steel in the immediate area.

Jeff

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Jeff,  this is good to know.  I did get some acid yesterday at Lowes, and was going to start the soak today.  I will now do it out on the deck/porch instead of in  the garage as I do not want harm my power tools that have cast iron tables and parts!  Thanks for this info!

 

Gwyl

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Yea acid can be helpful but harmful.  Definitely use it with caution.  I had a friend who used to make soda bottle bombs with hydrochloric acid (main ingredient in toilet bowl cleaner) and aluminum.  The mixture made a yellow gas that would eventually pop the bottle.  Probably why the article mentions using older brass and not the new stuff.  Aluminum will likely dissolve and the gas is probably very harmful.  I never got to close.  On a side note if you want to get the hard water stains off your windows use hydorchloric acid.  Melts it right off.  Learned that in my very short career as a window washer in college.  Don't use toilet bowl cleaner with bleach on windows though bleach leaves streaks but I digress.           

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  • 6 years later...

Many years ago I successfully installed a ship in a electric bulb which unfortunately my 2 year old discovered did not bounce

the method i used turned out good I cut the screwed portion with a fine saw removed the elements and after simply gluing the end back

the cut was invisible after I applied some gold paint 

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