Jump to content
Bottled Ship Builder

Chasseur

Members
  • Content Count

    555
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    110

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Marcos in The princess royal 1841   
    I’ve CADded the original cardboard sheet and reprinted the parts in 180g paper (allegedly the thickest stock the laser printer woul pull). I sprayed the bottom hull with tamiya hill red and the insides of the side panels dark grey. The side panels were then cut o size, the front groove cut to match the contour of the forward pole and glued to the hull using pva glue- micro crystal clear.









  2. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Marcos in The princess royal 1841   
    I am restarting the build on my model(after about 30 years!) ans would also like to have the scanned cardboard page.
    marcos_delucena@yahoo.com.br
    thanks!
    marcos
  3. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Marcos in The princess royal 1841   
    jskourn, I have the manual, which pages do you need?
     
  4. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Onni in What's on your workbench?   
    "Fram" designed and built by Colin Archer and used by Roald Amundsen for his Antarctic expedition.
     







  5. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Onni in What's on your workbench?   
    Just completed Hms Campbeltown (ex 131 Buchanan) depicting  the raid on St.Nazaire docks in 1942. Not that easy to depict a dockyard in a 75cl bottle but you get the idea.







  6. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Donald in Whimsical Ship in a bottle   
    I have a SIB collection as well as some folk art in bottles. I found this bottle on ebay, that is both of those. It is so interesting and different, I thought you folks might appreciate  a look. It came in the mail today and I found that the artists name is Jim Devaney.
     


  7. Like
    Chasseur reacted to exwafoo in A pair of 16 foot Hobie Catamarans   
    I wouldn't want to meet them on a dark night tho'. 😁
  8. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Donald in A pair of 16 foot Hobie Catamarans   
    Crew selection has been made.


  9. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings Jeff,
    Well, thank you for the honor of being recognized! Sounds like a plan to me, it's all here so just a notice pointing to the ongoing article should work fine. And, yes, everyone is suffering from the CV-19 pandemic, it's not like my classic 60'-70's soft rock is all that popular except for the few older people like myself. Most of that work is practice to keep in shape and remember all the lyrics and chords, but do make a few music videos for my friends.
    Thanks for the honor!
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John
  10. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from Moab in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Fair enough John, yeah no commitment as an honorary member whatsoever. I just want to recognize you and your past and present involvement. As far as an article, I can just create a small submission on BSW and then link it back to here for any updates etc. Your suggestion makes sense. Too bad about your business as everyone is suffering these days due to CV-19.
  11. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings Jeff,
    First, thanks for the kind words. The postings I have been making on the card/paper model experiments is written as a single article, as  a MS Word document file. I simply copy and paste it into this and the NRG Model Ship World postings. I write it as I work and photograph, sometimes takes a while between writing sessions due to experiments that don't work out or simply take a long time to work out. At present the .doc file is 37 pages, nearly 35MB, including separate files of the photos. I am far from finishing the experimenting or the article, so have no no idea how large it will finally turn out to be. As to summarizing the article, I really don't care to rehash what I've already written, it's enough work to write it to begin with. One could not use all the photographs to make it a smaller/shorter article I suppose. You can certainly use the postings in the journal, though I don't see much point as anyone who has joined this group has it available already, but it's your call there.
    I am not sure what honorary member of the journal actually means? As long as there is no commitment for future articles I guess it would be OK with me. I have many other pursuits, like my pro music career, which at present is at a standstill due to the Covid precautions, and during warmer months have many out doors involvements, so my time to model and write up my work is limited to mostly the colder months.
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John Fox III
  12. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from Moab in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Hey John very cool. Question would you be willing to summarize everything and put it into an article for the Bottled ShipWright Journal?
    Secondly, I would like to add you as an honorary member of the Journal. Are you okay with it?
     
    Jeff
  13. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from JesseLee in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Hey John very cool. Question would you be willing to summarize everything and put it into an article for the Bottled ShipWright Journal?
    Secondly, I would like to add you as an honorary member of the Journal. Are you okay with it?
     
    Jeff
  14. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from Bernard Kelly in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Hey John very cool. Question would you be willing to summarize everything and put it into an article for the Bottled ShipWright Journal?
    Secondly, I would like to add you as an honorary member of the Journal. Are you okay with it?
     
    Jeff
  15. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from ethanjhodgson in The Bottled ShipWright Journal Special Edition 2020   
    Here it is, our latest journal,
     
    Chass
    The Bottled Shipwright 2020.pdf
  16. Like
    Chasseur got a reaction from tazam0827 in Terry Butler   
    Yes this is very sad news. I had the privilege to get to know Terry through email response/correspondence. She passed the baton on to myself for editing the ShipWright magazine etc.
    She will be missed. For this years edition I will try and put together a special remembrance edition in her honor.
    Jeff AKA Chasseur
  17. Like
    Chasseur reacted to ethanjhodgson in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Fantastic work, I am eagerly waiting to see more ways to use cardstock.
     
    Ethan
  18. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings Bernard,
    I use both hand when rolling the paper around the tube, one near each end, but also move them into the middle occasionally. When it start going ascrew, I loosen it up just a wee bit and correct it as I reroll the paper. Thanks for the comment, I do try! <Grin>
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John Fox III
  19. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Bernard Kelly in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Hi John.
    That is fascinating. I imagine that rolling the paper around the tube was quite difficult as the paper would have a tendency to slacken off at one end whilst being tight at the other. Sometimes when I roll paper it tends to skew because keeping it taut all round the centre is difficult.
    Looking great though John. Keep posting the pics, I love seeing them.
    Best wishes 
    Bernard
  20. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings All,
                Work on the second hull continued with the start of a first layer of planking. This time I used well saturated cardboard that was thinner than that used on the first hull. These planks were stiffer, but also much more brittle. I also changed things up a little by using a white card stock, also saturated with thinned poly varnish, to delineate the waterline. The following photos show this work in progress. One thing to note is that this time I did not fill in the bow and stern areas with solid card stock, not sure if it was a good idea or not, it make planking much more difficult.

     
                One thing I am trying to accomplish with these experiments in card modeling is to see how far one can go with only cardboard and paper. I expect at some point I won't be able to take it all the way, but the only way to really find out is to experiment.
                While working on the planking for the second hull I would take breaks from that work to try out a method to make spars for the models. I used a variety of different sized aluminum and brass tubing, as well as a long miniature drill bit in my efforts. I wrapped very thin paper around the largest tube in my selection, carefully rolling the paper between my thumbs and forefingers on both hands around until the paper was tightly wrapped. I then let up slightly, removed the larger tube and inserted the next smaller tube and continued. I repeated this process until I had a tube that was slightly larger on the outside than the desired finished mast. While holding the paper tightly to the last tube/bit I applied CA glue to the point where paper ended, working from one end of the tube. I then slid the paper tube nearly off the tube, and saturated the entire outside of the tube with the CA glue.
                I then removed the paper tube from the brass/aluminum tube or drill bit, and used a thin sliver of bamboo to seal and harden the inside of the entire tube by dipping the sliver of bamboo into the thinned varnish and letting it drip from the tip of the sliver into the open end of the paper tube. I repeated this three of four times on each end, then pushed the bamboo sliver in and out to clear any excess varnish. I wanted the inside of the paper tube completely sealed, but also completely cleared so that the metal tube/bit could be reinserted. At this point I put the metal tube/bit back into the paper tube and sanded the outside of the tube to attempt to get the desired taper. After sanding a bit I would reach a point where the CA glue had not saturated and the paper would start to fray a bit. I would then add more CA glue to the outside of the paper tube, and continue again with the sanding. I repeated this process until I had the desired spar shape.
                Though the photos included below only show the finished mast parts for one model, I made many more tubes. I had to make up tubes that would be thick enough to be stiff at whatever desired size I needed, but that meant cutting many pieces of paper and gluing them up to determine the length of paper that worked best, i.e. not too much paper to make the tube walls too thick, but enough to make the tube as stiff as possible.
                The next portion of the work was making up layered solid pieces of card stock, to add to the tops of the mast tubes. These layered pieces were made to be as thick as the tops of the paper tubes, masts in these cases. These pieces are designed to make up the mast doubling areas. The layered pieces were then measured so that they were about twice as long as the mast top area, then one portion was cut and sanded into a solid, round stem. This stem portion would be inserted into the paper tube top end. Then they were sanded and cut into the proper side and shape for the mast tops.

     
                Work on the masts continued with making and adding the cheeks. I first made a template by gluing a cutout from the plans onto a single layer of card stock. I used that to trace the shapes onto a thicker layer of card stock, and cut them out. I glued them to the masts, then sanded a taper into the cheeks, thinner at the bottom to full thickness at the top.
                While doing this work I also glued the card decks onto the hull. I did glue a card stock beam to the underside of the stern edge of the forecastle deck. The holes for the masts were then cut out of the decks.  I also glued pieces of thinner white card stock to the insides of the bulwarks. I used thin paper pushed tightly to the deck and bulwarks to get the curved shape needed, then transferred that to the final card stock. The following photos show the work on mast cheeks and first hull with decks.

     
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John Fox III
  21. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings Omni,
    Yes, twisting of the keel is a problem with any bulkhead type of model. I had previously made one in styrene plastic, but there I made the bottom of the keel, center piece, deeper than needed, and used a wooden board with a slot to keep it all straight. Patience, as I often tell people who comment on my models in person, is something you need when you are doing something you don't like, I LOVE what I do so time doesn't matter.
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John
  22. Like
    Chasseur reacted to exwafoo in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    I've seen some of the modelers who scratch build from styrene use right angled metal blocks and magnets to hold the styrene sheet in place while the glue sets. It would probably work with card as well. Similarly, when I used to build balsa wood planes and boats years ago, pins hammered into the building board were used to keep things aligned until the glue set.
    Merry Christmas to all and wishing you a better New Year than the one we've had.
    Alan 
  23. Like
    Chasseur reacted to Onni in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    I always had trouble with the keel twisting out of shape after the bulkheads were glued in place so probably I should of made a jig out of wood or metal for the keel to sit in and keep it straight. Great work by the way, you need a lot of patience with card/paper models.
  24. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    Greetings All,
                Before continuing with this build article I would like to review some of what I've learned, and how it affects the work as it progresses. First of all I have learned that I need to soak/saturate the card stock from packaging much better. Originally I only used multiple painted coats of thinned poly varnish to do this work. I was only saturating the uncolored side, which is in effect sealed off by the printing. I have since learned to sand the colored side of the card stock, using 320 grit sandpaper and a small wood block, to roughen up the surface and remove as much of the sealed surface as possible. The second thing I've learned is to use a small plastic tray, in my case the base of a plastic container used locally to hold bakery goods, to literally soak the stock for at least five minutes. This worked much better at hardening and saturating the card stock. It makes it slightly more difficult to cut out parts, but keeps the fraying from unsaturated inner parts of the stock down to a minimum.
                Although not evident from the photos shown thus far, the hull does have some places where the top of the bulwarks are not symmetrical side-to-side. One side has a slight bulge and the other a bit too much tumblehome inwards. I believe this is due to the fact that I did not cut the slots for the individual pieces well enough, in some places the bulkheads were not perfectly 90 degrees from the keel piece. I didn't realize the problems this would cause later. I figured that although the center keel piece was forced out of alignment at the deck level, once the tops of the bulkhead pieces were glued to the spacer piece it would straighten out. I was wrong, the top of the center keel piece was pushed sideways slightly in places, but I could not see this until the hull was planked and cut from the spacer piece so I could view that area.
                As a lot of the work involved soaking or gluing, and then waiting for up to 24 hours to continue work, I decided to see if I could improve on the hull by starting over completely. Remember, this whole things is an experiment to see what is possible and what can go wrong and how to improve things with card/paper modeling. I am still working with the original hull,  as experimenting with it will help improve things overall.
                I redesigned the bulkheads and added some additional pieces to make what I believe will be a stronger and better hull. The following images show this new design.

                Like the previous plan drawings my CAD program exports rather poor images, I have all these drawings as PDF drawings if anyone is interested. The major changes to these plans are the additional longitudinal stiffeners and the open areas on most bulkheads at deck level. I am hoping that it makes cutting down to deck level much easier and more accurate. I also extended the bulkheads on each side right at the top of the bulwarks line, to make planking in that area much more accurate.
                I did make up the parts for the new hull, using the above mentioned soaking technique to the card stock this time. While the results were much better overall, it was a bit more difficult to cut the thoroughly saturated stock not to mention a lot more slot cuts were needed. The following images show some of the work on cutting out and gluing together that different parts. Each was made twice, and then each pair glued together to make up the final pieces.
     

                After the pieces were glued together to make up the hull parts, I dry fit each piece to all the pieces it would interact with in the final hull form. I made sure each piece fit easily and the pieces remained square to each other. It took a lot of time, and if a piece fit tight enough but slightly off square I would slightly enlarge the slot so that it would be square. Slightly over sized slots turned out not to be a problem, as there are so many pieces that fit together it did straighten it all out.
                The installation of the longitudinal pieces did require them to be installed on all the bulkheads that they interacted with at one time. And, due to the limited open areas above the deck level, they had to be put in place at 90 degrees to their final position. They were then slid into place and rotated to fit into their respective slots. A bit fiddly to do, but it worked out quite well due to the dry fitting and trimming of all the slots.
                The hull parts were put together in sub-assemblies, which were then added to the center keel piece. The larger center section had to be added first, then the stern and bow areas added. The following photos show this work.

                All the joints were then glued with white glue. This hull form was very stable. This time I glued the spacer print directly to a 3/8" maple board, and glued the tops of the bulkheads to that. Unlike the first hull, this time all the bulkheads lined up perfectly on the spacer print, with no adjustments needed. The following photo shows the final results of this process.

    More to follow.
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John Fox III
  25. Like
    Chasseur reacted to John Fox III in Experiments in Card/Paper Ship Modeling   
    A piece of thinner cardboard was then soaked in a bath of maple stain, to saturate it completely and evenly with color. I had tried just brushing stain on the board first, but the colorization was too uneven. Lines were then drawn on the board, spaced 1/32" apart, and the thin board templates used to trace the shape of the decks onto the stained board. These were cut out and tested to fit in their places, but not glued down yet. I also traced the outside edges of the main, lower, deck onto a non-lined area of the stained board and cut waterways for the hull. Following photos show some of this work.
    The actual cardboard was white, it came in a package of greetings cards.
    Anchor's A Weigh!
    John Fox III
×
×
  • Create New...