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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    The Insanity has been completed! I worked on this project off and on over the past 4 years. Life got in the way numerous times however I persevered. 'A mighty fortress is our God a bulwark never failing' is my motto under pressure. This is a Christmas gift for my youngest son!
    9 points
  2. Hanseat

    SCHULSCHIFF DEUTSCHLAND

    The first "real" ship in a bottle that I built was the SCHULSCHIFF DEUTSCHLAND. I got married on it in 2013. So it was a very personal event, which has revived the long-cherished desire. Everything is still a bit clunky and crooked, but made with muuuuch love. Including wedding couple on the back.😍
    9 points
  3. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Just finished the Spanker less the control lines that go to the Jigger Mast. I have to get the yards on the jigger first to determine length of control lines.
    9 points
  4. Österstjernan. A locally constructed 'packet ship' working from Loviisa,South East Finland.
    8 points
  5. My work on experimenting with card/paper model ship building continued with finishing up the second hull, the one with colored card stock second planking. The hull was cut free from the building board by slicing through the bulkheads at the top of the bulwarks. A simpler stand for the hull was made from blue colored card stock. The following photos show the freed second hull in the stand. The photos above show that I also added card stock blocking at the extreme bow and locations for the 3 masts. The multiple longitudinal bulkheads definitely define the deck areas much better than the first hull in my opinion. Work progressed with cutting down the interior edges of the bulwarks, removing the excess stock that was included in the bulkheads to make the hull more stable during planking. I used several tools that I built, made up from pieces of 1/16" interior diameter brass tubing and pieces cut from a single edged razor blade, with wooden handles made from maple. I used a Dremel moto tool with a cut-off wheel to cut the razor blade pieces of various widths at the cutting end. I shaped the other end into shanks that would fit into the brass tubing, then slid them in and glued them in place. These miniature chisels work nicely, and I've used them on many models in the past. The photo above shows how the interior planking of the bulwarks on the first model's hull turned out. I was not happy with these results, the uneven run was the result of not quite having faired the bulkheads properly, and partly due to the miniature clothes pins used to clamp the single piece planking in place. I decided that on the second hull I would experiment in ways to improve these problems. I ended up filling in the gaps between bulkheads with card stock before final sanding the bulkhead interior sanding. This definitely helped even things out, and kept the clamping devices from indenting the interior planking pieces. I did the same thing for the stern of the fore castle deck and fore face of the quarter deck as well. The following photos show this work. I then proceeded to cut away the tops of the bulkheads above my blocking. I decided that with the double layer of planking, the bulwarks would be thick enough with just a single layer of card stock glued inside. The next work was to cut and glue the white interior planking. This was a process of using paper to make templates and then transferring those outlines to the card stock and cutting. These strips and pieces were then glued in place. The results were much better than the first hull at this point. I also drilled the holes for the masts. The following photos show this work. Work continued on this second hull with making paper templates of all the decks. These were traced on stained white card stock and stained white paper with planking lines drawn on it. All of these parts were cut out and fitted to the hull, to make sure they fit properly. I then stained more white card stock, traced the deck parts and cut out some waterways for the model. I was not happy with the way these waterways looked, they were a bit too wide and attempting to cut or sand them thinner just didn't work. I decided to remake the waterways by staining a piece of white paper and then gluing them to card stock and cutting them out. These looked much better, but are still probably a bit too wide for this scale. The decks were then glued to the hull. The following photos show this work, the waterways photo shows the first ones made, I simply forgot to photograph the final waterways. The most challenging work on this second model hull was my next work. I used black card stock to make the cap rail for the hull, in a single piece. I placed the card stock on the top of the model, held it in place with a stiff piece of thick cardboard pressing tightly enough to follow the entire curve of the top of the bulwarks. I traced the outline of the bulwarks onto the stock and cut it out. I used a small compass to then traced a line 1/16" inside the outer edge of the stock. The difficult part was to cut out this inside edge as carefully as I could. I can say that it took 3 attempts to get past this last step, as noted above with the waterways it is nearly impossible to re-cut or sand this thin card stock if any spots were too wide. I did use a black magic marker on the cap rails edges, as this stock has a white interior. The waterways and cap rail were then glued onto the hull. The results are shown in the next photos. At this point I believe I will be ending my card stock and paper modeling efforts. I found it very interesting, and in some cases rewarding, to have attempted this work. My personal conclusions would be that I definitely would rather work with wood, it's more stable and easier to "work" than card stock. I was surprised at how well some things worked, such as making up the masts and yards. But during building and fitting to the second hull I have already broken several of the yards. Saturated construction paper is just too brittle in the end, as I related earlier. If I were to attempt any more card stock modeling I would most definitely use "solid" card stock, this stock has the color saturated through it's interior and not just on the outside faces like the stock I used. I also would probably not hesitate to use paint, or color printed detailing, on any further modeling of this type. I also learned more about bulkhead model work than I had previously known. Making the plans for a bulkhead model from a set of lines plans, using QCAD software, is interesting work, and these card stock models a nice way to test out my methodology. As a parting shot, I did make up the chain plates for the model, but being made of saturated construction paper they were so brittle that I did not bother to add them to the hull. Thanks for your patience in reading my experimentation in card stock modeling. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    8 points
  6. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Started on the Spanker with yards etc. Lots of rat lines to build as well. The Uschi thread is awesome, it will stretch and allow me to fold the yards sideways, to get the mast into the bottle! 👨‍🍳 Steady as she goes!
    8 points
  7. Shipbuilder

    Olivebank

    My latest, and probably last, major build. 25 feet to 1 inch. Hull length about thirteen inches (330mm) - An enormous scale for me ----------------------------------------------------- British four-masted barque Olivebank. Work commenced 13th July, 2020 Model completed 4th July 2021 During that time, I only worked on it for 61 days. The display case took 10.7 hours to make The hull took 35.9 hours to build The rigging took 41.8 hours to complete. Total hours worked: 88.4. That was an average of 1.45 hours for every working day. I never had much patience, and I am getting slower and slower as time goes on (now aged 77). ---------------------------------------- This vessel is modelled "as built" under British ownership (Andrew Weir's Bank Line). Certainly not a clipper, but more of the "windjammer" class with a large steel hull and great carrying capacity. She eventually became famous as a prominent member of the Erikson grain fleet of Finland. Going out to Australia in ballast, and returning to Europe with grain. She was the first casualty of World War II, striking a mine in late 1939. ------------------------------------- Further models will probably be confined to small ships, but in any case, my presence on internet forums has now virtually come to an end, and I am now only active in my Facebook group "Merchant Ships in Miniature." --------------------------------------- Life at best is but an enigma, and like children pursuing a "Will O' The Wisp,"so do we all pursue the illusive beacon light of a brighter and happier to-morrow - always hoping, never attaining, though striving ever until, wearied of the vain pursuit, at last we fall by the wayside and are forgotten. Charles Clark Munn (1847 - 1917)
    7 points
  8. Greetings All, Here are a few pics of my work on 1813 US brig Niagara. Scale is 1:200. She has a solid carved hull, planked with maple veneer. Apple wood stem and stern post, as well as keel. The cap rail is maple veneer, 3 layers. Grating is maple veneer. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  9. Votive ship (model) is usually gifted to a church to grant safety to seamen and all others at sea. They are quite common to see in churches in Scandinavia. I am attempting to replicate the one that is hanging in Porvoo church in Southern Finland. (See photo) The hull I am making is carved out of birch with the bulwarks in thin veneer. Hull has been cut into quarters to fit through the bottle neck. Forgot to post a shot of the bottle (coming up later!)but it is completely round about the size of a man’s hand. Bottle opening is a generous 23 mm. I plan to have the ship hanging inside the bottle by a hook.
    7 points
  10. Some friends of mine got a Siren 17 sailboat. Not sure if this is a ship, but I put it in a bottle!
    7 points
  11. Anyway have completed her now and she’s finished. Bit of a problem to get the bowsprit in place and also had to do a little repair on the rudder but otherwise went fairly smoothly and I am satisfied with the result.
    7 points
  12. Time to start putting her in the bottle. The stand seen with the ship parts does not go in the bottle,it was only used as a construction aid.
    7 points
  13. My new project is in progress...
    7 points
  14. Added the sails and some rigging,and tried to copy the flags/pendants on the original church model. Stern lantern is made out of clear perplex. Everything is going to be a tight fit in the bottle!
    7 points
  15. I thought I would post my first and only real ship in a bottle. I was refurbishing a simple Bluenose that I had made with my dad when I was a kid, and then figured I'd like to put one in a bottle. I based the ship on plans by John Fox III in volumes 55-56 of Model Ship Builder magazine from 1988. I did not include the jog in the deck, and my deck furniture is much simpler. I used fabric sails, bamboo masts and spars, no mast doublings, no diagonal stays between the masts, reduced number or rat lines, booms and masts whittled from a dowel that includes the jaws, scoring to indicate deck planking, a wider two-piece stand at the bottom, support posts offset from the keel, and addition of the staysail. I put a Blunose stamp on the bottom, and epoxied a dime to the cork. I made two of these ships at the same time, but am waiting for Gentleman Jack to get back in stock at the liquor store to put the second one in a bottle. I am pretty happy with the result, but I can see that the other builds on this site are at a whole other level! The plans for this ship by John Fox III were exactly what I needed to make the ship, but I had a hard time finding them, and was pretty lucky to get copies of the magazine on Amazon. I am wondering if there is a common website somewhere where people post similar sorts of instructions and hull and plan views? I am incredibly thankful to John Fox III.
    7 points
  16. The only plastic I used on this ship were the painted shields that adorn the outside of the fore and aft castles. Checking how she looks with masts and sails.
    7 points
  17. Painted the hull and started construction of the fore and aft ‘castles’.
    7 points
  18. Hi all, cold weather is forcing my "ship in bottle season" to open up. I have a wonderful, albeit large, model of The Sovereign of the Seas. I plan on restoring her in the future as the model is about a hundred years old. I bought it at an auction years ago and was later surprised to find tucked within her was a letter written by the gentleman that built it. I found a wonderfully large bottle on ebay and I decided to utilize the expertise and guidance of the Labistours' book "Making Ships In Bottles", and build this beautiful clipper ship within' it. As a newby I have learned a bit of what not to do via the "hard way". I have a collectors model of the Labistour's, that is among my absolute favorites. I found their book and I just love the methods, tips as well as the way it was written. I have fashioned a work stand per instructions and have begun the hull. That being said, I hope I can do the book justice. I found a book on how to make clipper models that included deck plans, sheer plans, breadth plans. rigging plans, jibboom plans etc. There is more detail than could be included on a S.I.B. but better too much information than the other way around.
    7 points
  19. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    She hit the bottle on the weekend! More fun to be had hooking everything up etc. What is the definition of insanity? Putting the Preussen into a wine bottle!
    7 points
  20. J.L.Runeberg,Porvoo,Finland.
    7 points
  21. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Now for the fun part, all of the rest of the rigging to get done! Also I have to make the jibs as well.
    7 points
  22. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    The Main mast is done less running rigging.
    7 points
  23. allan sib

    allan sib

    This is my model of HMS Ganges the very ship that gave its name to the famous or infamous boys training establishment, depends on how you viewed your time there as 15 year old boy seaman,I was there in 19-58 the place opened in 19-06 to 19-76 I believe that 15 year old boys stopped going there in 19-70 when the school leaving age was raised to 16.They used to say they took on 15 year old boys and turned out 16 year old men.I had suspended this build so as to finish my ww2 trawler model in time for the annual reunion at the sparrows nest the home of HMS Europa the patrol service base.
    7 points
  24. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    The Mizzen mast is done, which is weird as it sits midship on the Preussen. When I think of a mizzen mast it comes as something being located on the stern of a ship. I am modelling the sail detail taken off of the Cap Horn model by Heller. The Preussen will be in heavy seas as modelled. Also finished the detail on the stern in gold. Two more masts to rig up then it's on to the running rigging, then into the bottle. Or as the late Jack Hinkley would say, time to "Hit the Bottle."
    7 points
  25. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Jigger done less running rigging to be added.
    7 points
  26. allan sib

    allansib

    This is the 3 ship group for the gallon Grants bottle
    7 points
  27. allan sib

    allansib

    I would like to say thank you to the 2 members who welcomed me,I am no techie but a far better model maker,so I will try to upload my latest model pics. these are the 2 ww2 trawlers that I have just finished the biggest one is the Coldstreamer a military class and the other is the Mersey class HMT Boyne and the third one is a round table class called HMT Sir Lancelot still under construction all 3 will be launched into a gallon Grants whiskey bottle
    7 points
  28. This is the third model of the 3 ww2 trawlers that I am going to launch into a grants gallon bottle,this model is a tribute to the brave men of the Royal Naval Patrol Service of which over 600 trawlers were lost all over the world at a cost of 15,000 men a very high casualty rate by any standards, the other 2 are HMT Coldstreamer a military class the largest of all ww2 armed trawlers and HMT Boyne a mersey class trawler.
    7 points
  29. Turbinia 1894. Fastest ship in the world at that time with a speed of 34,5 Knots!
    7 points
  30. 6 points
  31. 6 points
  32. Thanks, John! Really looking forward to your talk in Manitowoc this year! I think I've solved the problem: file size. When I reduced the size, everything went fine. Dan
    6 points
  33. Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    PT-109. Still a work in progress….
    6 points
  34. Human-Doodle

    Ahoy landlubbers!

    Hi, Just checking in and saying Hi! My name is Nils and I am a London based self employed window cleaner. I’m just completing my first build this week, it’s Titanic in a hexagonal lambs spiced rum bottle. I will create a post and show progress shots in the correct area. thanks Nils
    6 points
  35. In progress...
    6 points
  36. Up to a couple of years ago all my modelling has been railway related. Wanting to do something new I have been building some wood ships and nautical wood kits. Being from Portsmouth and also living in Plymouth and working in the dockyards, all things nautical have also been an interest of mine. Now, having run out of wall space, and the smallest wood ships being about two foot long and not forgetting the height of the masts, I have decided to give ships in bottles a go as I can get more of my completed work on display.
    6 points
  37. allan sib

    allan sib

    This is my Ganges model fully rigged,though I have to confess that I blundered when adding the gun ports before the chain plates so they did not line up,so had to strip them off and add them after adding the chain plates ,lesson learned pay more attention to detail,now for sails and some deck fittings,I think I will keep her as a training ship with her deck guns removed.
    6 points
  38. allan sib

    allansib

    This is the complete model of my third trawler HMT Sir Lancelot
    6 points
  39. I would like to say thank you to the 2 members who welcomed me,I am no techie but a far better model maker,so I will try to upload my latest model pics. these are the 2 ww2 trawlers that I have just finished the biggest one is the Coldstreamer a military class and the other is the Mersey class HMT Boyne and the third one is a round table class called HMT Sir Lancelot still under construction all 3 will be launched into a gallon Grants whiskey bottle
    6 points
  40. Hanseat

    CUTTY SARK

    I had promised to present here some of my ships in bottles of the last years. But now I will show you my FIRST ship in a bottle, which I built at the age of ten. It is a plastic kit of the Clipper CUTTY SARK, which I got as a present at Christmas 1982 and "built" within three days. This is how it looked like... But nevertheless: Already at that time the desire should settle in me to build sometime a "correct" ship in a bottle, so completely without prefabricated parts. It should take over thirty years until it was finally so far... Best, Matthias
    6 points
  41. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    3 Masts; Spanker, Jigger, and Mizzen completed to date. Also starting to work on all of the ratlines.
    6 points
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