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  1. Greetings All, The work on the card and paper clipper model continued with quite a few more sealing and sanding, with small amounts of Bondo. Once I had a decent hull I made up the keel, stem and stern posts out of multiple layers of board. After reading more online about card models I learned to saturate the card stock with thinned down poly varnish, in order to make it stiffer and less prone to fraying when sanding. It also made cutting a wee bit harder, but worth the effort as it shapes up nicer when saturated. I did this by using a large art paint brush and applying the thinned varnish, then letting the card stock dry, and repeating the process until no more varnish would soak into the stock. The keel and stern/stem posts were made from this saturated card stock. I then used epoxy glue to install these parts. Unfortunately, I had to use painters tape to hold the parts in place while the epoxy cured, this resulted in removing the sealed surface of the hull where the tape was attached. It left fuzzy areas, so more sealing and light sanding was necessary to seal the entire surface of the hull again. At this point I used extra prints of four of the bulkheads and the spacer used to glue the bulkhead tops to the board to design and cut out card stock pieces to make up a couple of stands for the hull. The following photos show the results of this work. More to follow as the work progresses. Anchor's a Weigh! John Fox III
    12 points
  2. Just completed Hms Campbeltown (ex 131 Buchanan) depicting the raid on St.Nazaire docks in 1942. Not that easy to depict a dockyard in a 75cl bottle but you get the idea.
    10 points
  3. Trial and error on my "deck" or trampoline. I first tried to paint some silk-span black and make the deck from it but it would tear and I couldn't make the line look consistent where it laces together. After noodling around for a couple days, I scrapped that idea and went with cardboard. It is more stiff and able to handle the thread being pulled taught. Had to take a couple days off to set up a hockey rink in our backyard as there appeared to be a long cold snap coming, only for Mother Nature to warm things just enough to make the neighborhood kids wait until Christmas to play. Only included this since it inspired a possible "ice boat" in a bottle at some point. I will be able to put the decks in through the mouth of the bottle and then easily (famous last words) be able to attach to the pontoons.
    10 points
  4. Greetings All, Work on the second hull continued with the start of a first layer of planking. This time I used well saturated cardboard that was thinner than that used on the first hull. These planks were stiffer, but also much more brittle. I also changed things up a little by using a white card stock, also saturated with thinned poly varnish, to delineate the waterline. The following photos show this work in progress. One thing to note is that this time I did not fill in the bow and stern areas with solid card stock, not sure if it was a good idea or not, it make planking much more difficult. One thing I am trying to accomplish with these experiments in card modeling is to see how far one can go with only cardboard and paper. I expect at some point I won't be able to take it all the way, but the only way to really find out is to experiment. While working on the planking for the second hull I would take breaks from that work to try out a method to make spars for the models. I used a variety of different sized aluminum and brass tubing, as well as a long miniature drill bit in my efforts. I wrapped very thin paper around the largest tube in my selection, carefully rolling the paper between my thumbs and forefingers on both hands around until the paper was tightly wrapped. I then let up slightly, removed the larger tube and inserted the next smaller tube and continued. I repeated this process until I had a tube that was slightly larger on the outside than the desired finished mast. While holding the paper tightly to the last tube/bit I applied CA glue to the point where paper ended, working from one end of the tube. I then slid the paper tube nearly off the tube, and saturated the entire outside of the tube with the CA glue. I then removed the paper tube from the brass/aluminum tube or drill bit, and used a thin sliver of bamboo to seal and harden the inside of the entire tube by dipping the sliver of bamboo into the thinned varnish and letting it drip from the tip of the sliver into the open end of the paper tube. I repeated this three of four times on each end, then pushed the bamboo sliver in and out to clear any excess varnish. I wanted the inside of the paper tube completely sealed, but also completely cleared so that the metal tube/bit could be reinserted. At this point I put the metal tube/bit back into the paper tube and sanded the outside of the tube to attempt to get the desired taper. After sanding a bit I would reach a point where the CA glue had not saturated and the paper would start to fray a bit. I would then add more CA glue to the outside of the paper tube, and continue again with the sanding. I repeated this process until I had the desired spar shape. Though the photos included below only show the finished mast parts for one model, I made many more tubes. I had to make up tubes that would be thick enough to be stiff at whatever desired size I needed, but that meant cutting many pieces of paper and gluing them up to determine the length of paper that worked best, i.e. not too much paper to make the tube walls too thick, but enough to make the tube as stiff as possible. The next portion of the work was making up layered solid pieces of card stock, to add to the tops of the mast tubes. These layered pieces were made to be as thick as the tops of the paper tubes, masts in these cases. These pieces are designed to make up the mast doubling areas. The layered pieces were then measured so that they were about twice as long as the mast top area, then one portion was cut and sanded into a solid, round stem. This stem portion would be inserted into the paper tube top end. Then they were sanded and cut into the proper side and shape for the mast tops. Work on the masts continued with making and adding the cheeks. I first made a template by gluing a cutout from the plans onto a single layer of card stock. I used that to trace the shapes onto a thicker layer of card stock, and cut them out. I glued them to the masts, then sanded a taper into the cheeks, thinner at the bottom to full thickness at the top. While doing this work I also glued the card decks onto the hull. I did glue a card stock beam to the underside of the stern edge of the forecastle deck. The holes for the masts were then cut out of the decks. I also glued pieces of thinner white card stock to the insides of the bulwarks. I used thin paper pushed tightly to the deck and bulwarks to get the curved shape needed, then transferred that to the final card stock. The following photos show the work on mast cheeks and first hull with decks. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    9 points
  5. Greetings All, Before continuing with this build article I would like to review some of what I've learned, and how it affects the work as it progresses. First of all I have learned that I need to soak/saturate the card stock from packaging much better. Originally I only used multiple painted coats of thinned poly varnish to do this work. I was only saturating the uncolored side, which is in effect sealed off by the printing. I have since learned to sand the colored side of the card stock, using 320 grit sandpaper and a small wood block, to roughen up the surface and remove as much of the sealed surface as possible. The second thing I've learned is to use a small plastic tray, in my case the base of a plastic container used locally to hold bakery goods, to literally soak the stock for at least five minutes. This worked much better at hardening and saturating the card stock. It makes it slightly more difficult to cut out parts, but keeps the fraying from unsaturated inner parts of the stock down to a minimum. Although not evident from the photos shown thus far, the hull does have some places where the top of the bulwarks are not symmetrical side-to-side. One side has a slight bulge and the other a bit too much tumblehome inwards. I believe this is due to the fact that I did not cut the slots for the individual pieces well enough, in some places the bulkheads were not perfectly 90 degrees from the keel piece. I didn't realize the problems this would cause later. I figured that although the center keel piece was forced out of alignment at the deck level, once the tops of the bulkhead pieces were glued to the spacer piece it would straighten out. I was wrong, the top of the center keel piece was pushed sideways slightly in places, but I could not see this until the hull was planked and cut from the spacer piece so I could view that area. As a lot of the work involved soaking or gluing, and then waiting for up to 24 hours to continue work, I decided to see if I could improve on the hull by starting over completely. Remember, this whole things is an experiment to see what is possible and what can go wrong and how to improve things with card/paper modeling. I am still working with the original hull, as experimenting with it will help improve things overall. I redesigned the bulkheads and added some additional pieces to make what I believe will be a stronger and better hull. The following images show this new design. Like the previous plan drawings my CAD program exports rather poor images, I have all these drawings as PDF drawings if anyone is interested. The major changes to these plans are the additional longitudinal stiffeners and the open areas on most bulkheads at deck level. I am hoping that it makes cutting down to deck level much easier and more accurate. I also extended the bulkheads on each side right at the top of the bulwarks line, to make planking in that area much more accurate. I did make up the parts for the new hull, using the above mentioned soaking technique to the card stock this time. While the results were much better overall, it was a bit more difficult to cut the thoroughly saturated stock not to mention a lot more slot cuts were needed. The following images show some of the work on cutting out and gluing together that different parts. Each was made twice, and then each pair glued together to make up the final pieces. After the pieces were glued together to make up the hull parts, I dry fit each piece to all the pieces it would interact with in the final hull form. I made sure each piece fit easily and the pieces remained square to each other. It took a lot of time, and if a piece fit tight enough but slightly off square I would slightly enlarge the slot so that it would be square. Slightly over sized slots turned out not to be a problem, as there are so many pieces that fit together it did straighten it all out. The installation of the longitudinal pieces did require them to be installed on all the bulkheads that they interacted with at one time. And, due to the limited open areas above the deck level, they had to be put in place at 90 degrees to their final position. They were then slid into place and rotated to fit into their respective slots. A bit fiddly to do, but it worked out quite well due to the dry fitting and trimming of all the slots. The hull parts were put together in sub-assemblies, which were then added to the center keel piece. The larger center section had to be added first, then the stern and bow areas added. The following photos show this work. All the joints were then glued with white glue. This hull form was very stable. This time I glued the spacer print directly to a 3/8" maple board, and glued the tops of the bulkheads to that. Unlike the first hull, this time all the bulkheads lined up perfectly on the spacer print, with no adjustments needed. The following photo shows the final results of this process. More to follow. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    9 points
  6. The first "real" ship in a bottle that I built was the SCHULSCHIFF DEUTSCHLAND. I got married on it in 2013. So it was a very personal event, which has revived the long-cherished desire. Everything is still a bit clunky and crooked, but made with muuuuch love. Including wedding couple on the back.😍
    8 points
  7. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Just finished the Spanker less the control lines that go to the Jigger Mast. I have to get the yards on the jigger first to determine length of control lines.
    8 points
  8. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Glues, paints and puttys are finally drying up and a much clearer view is now possible. It’s now time to contemplate the work sipping some coffee. Thank you all who followed the build, now all that is needed is letting it dry a bot more just to guarantee now condensation and close the cap.
    8 points
  9. Slow progress, haven't really done anything since november, kind of lost the will with current situation, but thought it was about time to knuckle down and crack on with it. probably not going to do much more to the hull apart from a few small deckdetails. Time to start the lateen rigged masts,the holes are drilled and lined up ready. 😁
    8 points
  10. Destroyed the deck trying to squeeze it in, so hurriedly had to make a new one out of slightly thinner veneer. Luckily second attempt succeeded.
    8 points
  11. Work on the card/paper models continued with finishing up the masts and bowsprit/jib boom. The process for making the top and topgallant masts was similar to the work involved with making the lower masts. Various sized rods and tubes were wrapped with brown paper, using a tube or rod of the appropriate size to make the final paper tube a bit larger than necessary. The next steps were to sand the glued paper tubes to the proper size and shape. This work was very tedious as the CA glue applied to the outside of the tubing only saturated the paper for a few layers. As the sanding reached those unglued layers the paper because fuzzy and started to unwrap a bit. At those points an additional application of the CA glue was necessary. I found it necessary in many cases to have to repeat these steps quite a few times to get the tubes to final shape. The doublings for each mast overlap were made by making mast tops and trestle cross trees out of 3 or 4 layers of varnish saturated white card stock. I found that using the thinnest card stock worked best for these parts. Holes were drilled and cleared out to shape using an X-acto knife and #11 blade. The problems arose when using thicker card stock during the drilling and cutting phases of the work. The inner portions of the thicker card stock were not saturated with the varnish, and would start to separate as I drilled, or cut. This caused the drill bit to just push aside some of the inner card stock, which caused that portion of the part I was working to swell up and become thicker. Even when working with thinner card stock this happened to a lesser extent. What worked for me was to drill a few increasingly larger holes, then add a bit of CA glue into the hole. In this case I started with a #80 drill bit, then a size #76 followed by a #70 sized bit. Once these tiny holes were drilled I added the CA glue This hardened the area around the hole on the inner layers and helped stabilize the part. When larger holes were needed, larger drill bits were used, applying the CA glue to each hole after drilling. The same sort of technique was used when cutting and shaping the outside of white parts of the doublings, for much the same reason. Cutting to roughly the correct size and shape for a part, CA glued was applied to the edges, where the individual layers of the card stock were exposed. This work stabilized the part, and kept the layers from separating while further cutting and sanding to final size and shape. As with the doubling portion made for the lower masts, the tubes were connected together with pin like extensions of a part, or with card pins made from layers of stock glued together and then sanded round and to fit inside the necessary tubes. The white portions of the upper mast in each doubling was just a white paper tube, made like all the rest. The most difficult masts to make were the topgallant masts. In all cases I was simply unable to sand them down to a fine enough shape and size without their collapsing or unwrapping of the brown paper used. A fine pin of solid stock was glued into the tops of the tubes, with a bit sticking out the end. The work was similar to the other masts, sanding and applying glue as necessary. The following photos show the final results, including an exploded view of each portion of the total mast assembly. Note: While my purpose was to make an entire model from nothing but glue, paper and card stock, it would have been far easier and much closer to exact scale if I had been working with wood for masts and sheet styrene for top, trestle cross trees and mast caps. It took far longer to work with the paper and card stock, especially when having to use separate colors for the parts to keep from having to use paint. Simultaneously to work on the masts for the models was continued work on the second hull. The brown saturated card stock planks were added to finish the lower hull on the side shown in the earlier photo. The other side of the hull was then planked in the exact same manner. After planking was complete, as thin a coat as possible of epoxy was "painted" onto the entire hull surface with a thin, stiff brush. My previous attempts to thin two-part epoxy with rubbing alcohol never worked out right, the glue never cured. Not being thinned made applying a thin coat much more difficult in the end. Once the epoxy coating had cured, the entire hull was lightly sanded with 320 grit sandpaper, to even out the coating. As desired, the coating hardened the card stock surface making it far easier to sand and even things out. In an effort not use paint on this hull, I decided to use two colors of card stock. I found a moderately copper looking card stock at a local shop, and used black construction paper for the second color. Both stock were saturated with thinned poly varnish and allowed to dry. A wooden jig was then constructed to make it easier to cut 1/16" wide strips from both colored stock. At that size it was a bit out of scale, about 2' wide. I found that there is a vast difference between the construction paper and the copper colored card stock at this point. The cut edges of the card stock were white, meaning the color was only applied to the outside surfaces, where as the construction paper was solid black through it's thickness. I did a little research online to look for card stock that might work better, what I found was that there are two types of card stock. The "normal" stock has color only on the surfaces, while the "solid core" card stock had color the same as construction paper. Unfortunately, the solid core stocks were much heavier and thicker, so I decided to use what I had. While researching the stock, I did find that there are some copper card stock that looks just like metal copper, but none that were solid core. Another thing I found with my experiment was that the varnish fully saturated the construction paper, but not the card stock. The color on the outside surface of the card stock seems to seal it allowing minimal saturation. This led to the black paper being much stiffer, harder and brittle, but the colored stock being the opposite. The colored paper easily bent to fit against the first planking layer, while the black paper would crack and break if attempting to force it to shape. The second hull was now planked, using the white plank line on the first plank layer as a guide to separate the copper lower hull from the black upper hull. The effect of this planking looks quite reasonable from any distance, but close up one can see the white edges of the copper stock in areas of extreme curvature of the hull. There are also a few places where the fit wasn't quite right, and a small portion of overlap of the previous plank installed happened, which left a raised portion of that copper colored plank. There are also a few spots where the planks left very slight gaps, allowing the brown planking beneath to show through. In the end, while the second planking definitely is not as good as I wished, it does do a reasonable job of duplicating a ships hull. I will attempt to keep the errors from the first side planking to occur on the second side as I work. Were I to do it again, I might make the hull form a bit smaller, so that the much thicker solid core card stock could be used for the colored planking without compromising the scale. I may attempt to alleviate the problems of the copper colored planking by lightly sanding the copper stock to get rid of raised areas and then use a green colored thinned paint "wash". My thinking is that it would look somewhat realistic, but would compromise my idea of not using paint. The following photos show the planking work to date. There are some areas that shine on both planking colors, these are areas where it was necessary to apply some CA glue to the outside of the planking. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    8 points
  12. Some more progress!
    8 points
  13. allan sib

    allan sib

    This is my model of HMS Ganges the very ship that gave its name to the famous or infamous boys training establishment, depends on how you viewed your time there as 15 year old boy seaman,I was there in 19-58 the place opened in 19-06 to 19-76 I believe that 15 year old boys stopped going there in 19-70 when the school leaving age was raised to 16.They used to say they took on 15 year old boys and turned out 16 year old men.I had suspended this build so as to finish my ww2 trawler model in time for the annual reunion at the sparrows nest the home of HMS Europa the patrol service base.
    7 points
  14. allan sib

    allansib

    This is the 3 ship group for the gallon Grants bottle
    7 points
  15. My work on experimenting with card/paper model ship building continued with finishing up the second hull, the one with colored card stock second planking. The hull was cut free from the building board by slicing through the bulkheads at the top of the bulwarks. A simpler stand for the hull was made from blue colored card stock. The following photos show the freed second hull in the stand. The photos above show that I also added card stock blocking at the extreme bow and locations for the 3 masts. The multiple longitudinal bulkheads definitely define the deck areas much better than the first hull in my opinion. Work progressed with cutting down the interior edges of the bulwarks, removing the excess stock that was included in the bulkheads to make the hull more stable during planking. I used several tools that I built, made up from pieces of 1/16" interior diameter brass tubing and pieces cut from a single edged razor blade, with wooden handles made from maple. I used a Dremel moto tool with a cut-off wheel to cut the razor blade pieces of various widths at the cutting end. I shaped the other end into shanks that would fit into the brass tubing, then slid them in and glued them in place. These miniature chisels work nicely, and I've used them on many models in the past. The photo above shows how the interior planking of the bulwarks on the first model's hull turned out. I was not happy with these results, the uneven run was the result of not quite having faired the bulkheads properly, and partly due to the miniature clothes pins used to clamp the single piece planking in place. I decided that on the second hull I would experiment in ways to improve these problems. I ended up filling in the gaps between bulkheads with card stock before final sanding the bulkhead interior sanding. This definitely helped even things out, and kept the clamping devices from indenting the interior planking pieces. I did the same thing for the stern of the fore castle deck and fore face of the quarter deck as well. The following photos show this work. I then proceeded to cut away the tops of the bulkheads above my blocking. I decided that with the double layer of planking, the bulwarks would be thick enough with just a single layer of card stock glued inside. The next work was to cut and glue the white interior planking. This was a process of using paper to make templates and then transferring those outlines to the card stock and cutting. These strips and pieces were then glued in place. The results were much better than the first hull at this point. I also drilled the holes for the masts. The following photos show this work. Work continued on this second hull with making paper templates of all the decks. These were traced on stained white card stock and stained white paper with planking lines drawn on it. All of these parts were cut out and fitted to the hull, to make sure they fit properly. I then stained more white card stock, traced the deck parts and cut out some waterways for the model. I was not happy with the way these waterways looked, they were a bit too wide and attempting to cut or sand them thinner just didn't work. I decided to remake the waterways by staining a piece of white paper and then gluing them to card stock and cutting them out. These looked much better, but are still probably a bit too wide for this scale. The decks were then glued to the hull. The following photos show this work, the waterways photo shows the first ones made, I simply forgot to photograph the final waterways. The most challenging work on this second model hull was my next work. I used black card stock to make the cap rail for the hull, in a single piece. I placed the card stock on the top of the model, held it in place with a stiff piece of thick cardboard pressing tightly enough to follow the entire curve of the top of the bulwarks. I traced the outline of the bulwarks onto the stock and cut it out. I used a small compass to then traced a line 1/16" inside the outer edge of the stock. The difficult part was to cut out this inside edge as carefully as I could. I can say that it took 3 attempts to get past this last step, as noted above with the waterways it is nearly impossible to re-cut or sand this thin card stock if any spots were too wide. I did use a black magic marker on the cap rails edges, as this stock has a white interior. The waterways and cap rail were then glued onto the hull. The results are shown in the next photos. At this point I believe I will be ending my card stock and paper modeling efforts. I found it very interesting, and in some cases rewarding, to have attempted this work. My personal conclusions would be that I definitely would rather work with wood, it's more stable and easier to "work" than card stock. I was surprised at how well some things worked, such as making up the masts and yards. But during building and fitting to the second hull I have already broken several of the yards. Saturated construction paper is just too brittle in the end, as I related earlier. If I were to attempt any more card stock modeling I would most definitely use "solid" card stock, this stock has the color saturated through it's interior and not just on the outside faces like the stock I used. I also would probably not hesitate to use paint, or color printed detailing, on any further modeling of this type. I also learned more about bulkhead model work than I had previously known. Making the plans for a bulkhead model from a set of lines plans, using QCAD software, is interesting work, and these card stock models a nice way to test out my methodology. As a parting shot, I did make up the chain plates for the model, but being made of saturated construction paper they were so brittle that I did not bother to add them to the hull. Thanks for your patience in reading my experimentation in card stock modeling. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  16. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Started on the Spanker with yards etc. Lots of rat lines to build as well. The Uschi thread is awesome, it will stretch and allow me to fold the yards sideways, to get the mast into the bottle! 👨‍🍳 Steady as she goes!
    7 points
  17. Forecastle area completed. Working on the Bowsprit etc.
    7 points
  18. The experiments continued with finishing the colored planking on the second hull. The keel, stem and stern posts were added and covered with the copper colored card stock as well. The entire hull was then coated several times with thinned varnish. The following photos show the hull as it stands now. The majority of my time has been spent making the yards for the masts. It was found that laminating black construction paper worked out the best for their construction. Using liberal amounts of CA glue to laminate the paper, including soaking the outside of the layered pieces. From that point the laminated parts were treated much as I would making yards out of wood. I first sanded them into a square cross section as thick as the center of the yard, then slightly tapered the pieces on either end. Then sanded the yard into a hexagonal cross section throughout. Finally sanding the yard blank round in cross section. As with most of the other paper/card construction, it was necessary occasionally to apply a bit more CA glue when an unsaturated area was encountered. I also noticed that the laminated construction paper was a bit more brittle than most woods, so care was taken. All the upper yards used a simple fitting glued to them in order to attach them to the masts with a bit of fine thread. The crossjack and course yards were attached using a hanging bracket arrangement which was as close as I could get, at the scale and using the material, to what was shown on the plans. I also used two tiny pieces of brass wire in making the brackets, which allow those yards to swing partway around the masts. The final pieces to these yard hangers was fake chain, which was made from 8/0 fly tying thread. The fake chain was made by tying double overhand knot in the center of a length of thread around a #80 drill bit, which was fitted shank side down into a length of wood. The drill bit was then pulled up and removed from the thread loop. A length of the same thread was then tied through the loop and extended down the length of the wood, where it was held mildly tightly with a rubber band wrapped around both wood and length of thread. The thread was then pulled away from the reinserted drill bit, to keep the loop directly opposite the bit while tying a second double overhand knot. It was impossible to keep tying these knots exactly opposite each other, so the fake chain looks a bit "squiggly" when just laying there. It does look fairly realistic when pulled tightly. The fake chain was tied, with a small piece of thread through the first loop, to a small wire eye bolt. The eye bolt was made by twisting a piece of extremely thin wire around a #80 drill bit, using a forceps to twist until the wire broke. This eye bolt was glued into a hole drilled just below the mast top. The thread chain was then wrapped around the center of the yard, and a second small thread piece was inserted through loops in the chain twice. It took a bit of practice to choose the right loops to pass this thread through so that when a knot was tied into the thread it pulled to chain tightly around the yard center. The knots in the two threads were glued and the excess thread cut and removed. The following photos show the pieces and results of this portion of my experimenting. Anchors A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  19. Working on the deck and fitting her out. If you look closely at the shack at the stern you can see I just glued it. I have some more handrailing and another ladder to install on the aft, another funnel as well. Then I'll move to mid-ship to install some handrailing and two funnels on to and 2 below. Then I'll move forward to install the walkway from mid-ship to the bow area. Slow but sure, the CV variants have kept me extremely busy at work trying to navigate work flow and staff issues.
    7 points
  20. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    The moment of truth has arrived!
    7 points
  21. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Bow stays A and B are on!
    7 points
  22. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Started working on the sea of putty. Putty was laid in many years ago and was almost totally dry. I found it to be a little high to fit the ship so I scraped some of it off. The picture shows a height gauge to confirm ship will fit.
    7 points
  23. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    I’ve CADded the original cardboard sheet and reprinted the parts in 180g paper (allegedly the thickest stock the laser printer woul pull). I sprayed the bottom hull with tamiya hill red and the insides of the side panels dark grey. The side panels were then cut o size, the front groove cut to match the contour of the forward pole and glued to the hull using pva glue- micro crystal clear.
    7 points
  24. Boy just when you think you know something... I spent all day today and managed to get the first of the two catamarans in the bottle. I had to use a small roll of putty to squish the hulls into to keep them straight.
    7 points
  25. 7 points
  26. I completely ruined my original bottle by messing around trying to save it from angry epoxy seas. I got goo on the inside and slop for a base so... I got a new bottle. This time instead of epoxy, I rolled up some plastalina in the shape of my "sea base", slid it in and unrolled it. It was a bit hard to unroll so I put it on a heating pad for a while and that helped. Once I had the Plastalina clay tamped down, I rolled up the "sea base" and slid it in. Once in the bottle I flipped the "sea base" over, put some glue on it then flipped it on top of the Plastalina clay. I pushed down on the "sea base" into the clay as best I could. Then I held the bottle over the gas burner on my stove for a minute to soften the clay and accept the "sea base". I put a little white silicon on the bottom of my starting buoy and placed it in the far end of the bottle. I started a dry practice run to put the catamarans in the bottle and I broke a peg that goes from the trampoline deck into the hull. I've glued that up, but I have used up my daily supply of patience. Tomorrow looms hopeful.
    7 points
  27. Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    "Fram" designed and built by Colin Archer and used by Roald Amundsen for his Antarctic expedition.
    7 points
  28. A piece of thinner cardboard was then soaked in a bath of maple stain, to saturate it completely and evenly with color. I had tried just brushing stain on the board first, but the colorization was too uneven. Lines were then drawn on the board, spaced 1/32" apart, and the thin board templates used to trace the shape of the decks onto the stained board. These were cut out and tested to fit in their places, but not glued down yet. I also traced the outside edges of the main, lower, deck onto a non-lined area of the stained board and cut waterways for the hull. Following photos show some of this work. The actual cardboard was white, it came in a package of greetings cards. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  29. Picked up some bamboo skewers. The difference from regular wooden dowels is amazing, the bamboo is so incredibly strong. Playing with ideas of how to "peg" it together once through the mouth of the bottle.
    7 points
  30. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Now for the fun part, all of the rest of the rigging to get done! Also I have to make the jibs as well.
    6 points
  31. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Jigger done less running rigging to be added.
    6 points
  32. Österstjernan. A locally constructed 'packet ship' working from Loviisa,South East Finland.
    6 points
  33. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    All the masts are done save ratlines and rigging. Yards are done up, painted & ready to go. Now comes the fun part all of the rigging etc. Steady as she goes!
    6 points
  34. Meinen ersten Beitrag (nach meiner Vorstellung) möchte ich mit einem meiner neueren Schiffe beginnen. Es handelt sich hierbei um das letzte von insgesamt vier von mir fertiggestellten, sogenannten 'Orlogschiffen'. Die Vorbilder hängen in meiner Heimatstadt Bremen im Rathaus von 1404. Sie stammen aus den Jahren zwischen 1545 und 1779. Das 'Wapen van Bremen', wurde 1750 gebaut und stellt ein Linienschiff von 1689 dar. Ich habe mein Modell in einem 25-Liter-Gärballon in Segmentbauweise eingebracht und dafür rund drei Monate gebraucht.
    6 points
  35. Moab

    Test build of Lady Isabel

    Below are photos of a quick build of the Lady Isabel. I first saw this boat in a 2018 issue of the National Research Guild Journal and loved it's odd lines. The model in the journal was built by the late Steve Wheeler and is a beauty. One description calls it a canoe back. I wanted to model this for a bottle but do this test buils first. Now I'm not sure if I want to build it for a bottle or a larger (1:75) model....perhaps both...Moab
    6 points
  36. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Sails are up! craddle received the first stain and varnish coat.
    6 points
  37. These pictures are out of sequence but no matter... Needing somewhere to run the lines, I hit upon the idea of a heavy rope around the gunwales. Not really nautically accurate, but I think it looks quite in keeping with the general 'fantasy with one toe in reality' feel of this whole project. It's fixed down with little spots of ca glue, leaving gaps in useful places. I also made the hole for the mast with a lead-in which gets hidden by the deck tent. The idea is to push up the mast, rather like a pole-vault box. The last picture shows the final arrangement plan, with the teabag sail. Soon time for the tricky stuff!
    6 points
  38. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Got the fixed rigging done. Now to the front movable stays and sail rigs.
    6 points
  39. Onni

    Shipwrecked!

    All these hulls never made it into a bottle, for one reason or another. I'm getting quite a collection now! Anybody else have any failed ship stories that never got off the drawing board and into a bottle?
    6 points
  40. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Not much progress this weekend- cleaned up the trestle and did the first round of rigging. The bowsprite was quite easy. I have some doubts about the frizzy thread. Tried to reduce it with some wax, white glue and varnish, but with doubtful results. What do you think is good to reduce the frizz on polyether thread? Otherwise the thread looks good- color and tightness are great. Thanks for the comments!
    6 points
  41. 6 points
  42. Marcos

    The princess royal 1841

    Basic hull is naow complete. I’ve used a 0.8mm drill overall. Still need to do the holes on the side bumbpers. Then the dreaded rigging... plasticine sea was still malleable even after 30 years. I am still deciding if i go qith murky north sea grean or dark blue as a high atlantic sea colors.
    6 points
  43. I have a SIB collection as well as some folk art in bottles. I found this bottle on ebay, that is both of those. It is so interesting and different, I thought you folks might appreciate a look. It came in the mail today and I found that the artists name is Jim Devaney.
    6 points
  44. So I ran into a bit of trouble. I mixed a two part epoxy to go into the bottle as a base for my "sea". I'm not sure where I went wrong but it wasn't getting hard, so I put a bit more of the hardener in and swirled it with a stick. It helped some but as you can see there is still a little fluid on the top of what has hardened. In doing all this, it rose the sea level to high tide and messed up my plans a bit. The way I originally had the cats oriented, when flying a hull it would hit the roof of the bottle. So, I have been experimenting with a different orientation so now when the cats are flying a hull, the mast top will be tipped over lengthwise into the bottle instead of sideways. Hope that made sense. I buried a couple of "pegs" for each cat hull in the acrylic so when slid on, they assume the correct posture. True to form, I typically do things 3 or 4 times before it is acceptable. It's working out well in my mind at this point, so hopefully that translates to minimal issues on bottle day.
    6 points
  45. I am trying to make some little sailors to sail the Hobie's and it is turning out to be more difficult than I thought. since they are so small. Oh well, thus the life of a bottled ship builder. I found some 2 part epoxy for this purpose and formed some 24 gauge wire to put the epoxy putty on. Obviously with anything new there is a learning curve so consequently, I have numerous partially done sailors that just wouldn't make the cut. I tried to pose them doing what they should be doing when they should be doing it but still a work in progress. I am in the process of painting them with some acrylic paints and trying to figure out how to anchor them.
    6 points
  46. Greetings Omni, Yes, twisting of the keel is a problem with any bulkhead type of model. I had previously made one in styrene plastic, but there I made the bottom of the keel, center piece, deeper than needed, and used a wooden board with a slot to keep it all straight. Patience, as I often tell people who comment on my models in person, is something you need when you are doing something you don't like, I LOVE what I do so time doesn't matter. Anchor's A Weigh! John
    6 points
  47. I've seen some of the modelers who scratch build from styrene use right angled metal blocks and magnets to hold the styrene sheet in place while the glue sets. It would probably work with card as well. Similarly, when I used to build balsa wood planes and boats years ago, pins hammered into the building board were used to keep things aligned until the glue set. Merry Christmas to all and wishing you a better New Year than the one we've had. Alan
    6 points
  48. O.K., so I mocked up a paper catamaran on a swivel and there really is just not enough room for the masts at the top of the bottle if they are to be accurate in scale so starting over at square one. Much better at this stage of the game than later.
    6 points
  49. Just messing around with a quick "Bluenose" to launch in a little pumpkinseed bottle.
    6 points
  50. Greetings All, The work on the hull progressed by sanding down all the planking, to get as smooth and fair a surface as I could. I sanded, then applied poly varnish thinned 50/50 with paint thinner until it no longer soaked in. Waited for the varnish to dry, then sanded again. I repeated this process many times. While sanding I could see areas where the planks pushed inwards slightly, and small gaps in the finish. I used Bondo glazing and spot putty, applied with a stiff piece of styrene plastic, to cover the gaps and low spots. Again, after Bondo dried the hull was sealed and sanded. I did this perhaps 3 or 4 times before I had a smooth surface over the entire outer hull shape. Once I had a decent hull shape I used a razor saw to cut through the bulkhead extensions that held the hull to the cardboard mounted on the maple board. The following photos show the hull to this point. Work on this first hull progressed with carving the insides of the bulkheads down to the deck levels. I used a chisel type blade in my knife to do this work. The raised forecastle and quarter decks were reasonably easy to work, while the lower mid deck was difficult. I did add some extra pieces of cardboard to the center keel piece in the locations that would later have holes drilled to accept the mast extensions. All the deck areas were then sanded down to the deck lines on the bulkheads, a small amount of Bondo was added as the extra pieces did not quite come flush with the deck level. The following photos show the work thus far. I next worked on making templates of all the deck areas. I used thin paper cut to approximately the right size and shape at first, then pressed them into locations and creased it sharply at each of the bulkhead extension inside the bulwarks. The paper was removed and cut to follow the crease curves. I traced these templates onto thinner card stock and tested the fit on each deck location to finalize the exact shape for each deck area. A piece of thinner cardboard was then soaked in a bath of maple stain, to saturate it completely and evenly with color. I had tried just brushing stain on the board first, but the colorization was too uneven. Lines were then drawn on the board, spaced 1/32" apart, and the thin board templates used to trace the shape of the decks onto the stained board. These were cut out and tested to fit in their places, but not glued down yet. I also traced the outside edges of the main, lower, deck onto a non-lined area of the stained board and cut waterways for the hull. Following photos show some of this work. More to follow as I work along. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    6 points
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