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  1. Shipbuilder

    Baron Vernon

    .
    9 points
  2. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    The Insanity has been completed! I worked on this project off and on over the past 4 years. Life got in the way numerous times however I persevered. 'A mighty fortress is our God a bulwark never failing' is my motto under pressure. This is a Christmas gift for my youngest son!
    9 points
  3. I thought I would post my first and only real ship in a bottle. I was refurbishing a simple Bluenose that I had made with my dad when I was a kid, and then figured I'd like to put one in a bottle. I based the ship on plans by John Fox III in volumes 55-56 of Model Ship Builder magazine from 1988. I did not include the jog in the deck, and my deck furniture is much simpler. I used fabric sails, bamboo masts and spars, no mast doublings, no diagonal stays between the masts, reduced number or rat lines, booms and masts whittled from a dowel that includes the jaws, scoring to indicate deck planking, a wider two-piece stand at the bottom, support posts offset from the keel, and addition of the staysail. I put a Blunose stamp on the bottom, and epoxied a dime to the cork. I made two of these ships at the same time, but am waiting for Gentleman Jack to get back in stock at the liquor store to put the second one in a bottle. I am pretty happy with the result, but I can see that the other builds on this site are at a whole other level! The plans for this ship by John Fox III were exactly what I needed to make the ship, but I had a hard time finding them, and was pretty lucky to get copies of the magazine on Amazon. I am wondering if there is a common website somewhere where people post similar sorts of instructions and hull and plan views? I am incredibly thankful to John Fox III.
    8 points
  4. This project is completed ...
    8 points
  5. Today in progress...
    8 points
  6. DMC1964

    Yacht America 1851

    Quick update tonight. I've done the rough cutting of the block down to the hull lines. Next step is the most difficult -- I think -- final shaping of the hull. I'm not sure what the right tool is to do that. This model is so small that a rotary tool is probably too aggressive. And I'm thinking about making the kinds of hull templates you use when you're making a larger solid hull model. Without those I don't see how I can keep the hull symmetrical. Dan
    7 points
  7. DMC1964

    Yacht America 1851

    Thanks, John! I'd thought I would do that initially, but then cut from the top view. Live and learn. It looks like it's going to work out alright. I traced the waterline on the back of the template so I could position it properly on the other side of the hull block. Then I clamped the template to the hull block. And traced it out... Here you can see the outline and the waterline drawn on the other side of the template. Now it's time to cut down to the cap rail and form the sheer of the hull. Dan
    7 points
  8. DMC1964

    Yacht America 1851

    I've crossed the Rubicon. I scaled up the drawings to fit the hull blank I have. (I used the plans redrawn by Howard Chapelle in 1933.) That made the model too wide to fit through the neck of the bottle I have, so I will definitely need a bigger bottle. I marked the outline of the hull, the waterline, the locations of the masts and the locations of the aligning pins on the drawings and then lined all that up on the hull blank. I mounted the drawings on 1/16" basswood, creating templates. Next step: trace the hull lines from the template to the hull blank and then use my razor saw to cut down from the top of the block to the top of the cap rail to form the sheer of the hull. Dan
    7 points
  9. Hi all, cold weather is forcing my "ship in bottle season" to open up. I have a wonderful, albeit large, model of The Sovereign of the Seas. I plan on restoring her in the future as the model is about a hundred years old. I bought it at an auction years ago and was later surprised to find tucked within her was a letter written by the gentleman that built it. I found a wonderfully large bottle on ebay and I decided to utilize the expertise and guidance of the Labistours' book "Making Ships In Bottles", and build this beautiful clipper ship within' it. As a newby I have learned a bit of what not to do via the "hard way". I have a collectors model of the Labistour's, that is among my absolute favorites. I found their book and I just love the methods, tips as well as the way it was written. I have fashioned a work stand per instructions and have begun the hull. That being said, I hope I can do the book justice. I found a book on how to make clipper models that included deck plans, sheer plans, breadth plans. rigging plans, jibboom plans etc. There is more detail than could be included on a S.I.B. but better too much information than the other way around.
    7 points
  10. Votive ship (model) is usually gifted to a church to grant safety to seamen and all others at sea. They are quite common to see in churches in Scandinavia. I am attempting to replicate the one that is hanging in Porvoo church in Southern Finland. (See photo) The hull I am making is carved out of birch with the bulwarks in thin veneer. Hull has been cut into quarters to fit through the bottle neck. Forgot to post a shot of the bottle (coming up later!)but it is completely round about the size of a man’s hand. Bottle opening is a generous 23 mm. I plan to have the ship hanging inside the bottle by a hook.
    7 points
  11. Greetings All, The following photos show how I made the 12 pdr. cannon and 32 pdr. carronades for my 1:200 scale model of Niagara/Lawrence. Both barrels are made from paper tightly rolled around an appropriate sized drill bit shank, saturated with CA glue, then sanded to shape. It did take multiple applications of the glue, as it could only penetrate one or two layers of the rolled paper. I used standard inkjet printer paper, soaked in ink jet ink, I had a spare cartridge for my printer so used that for the ink. The carraiges and slides were made from maple. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  12. Greetings All, Here are a few pics of my work on 1813 US brig Niagara. Scale is 1:200. She has a solid carved hull, planked with maple veneer. Apple wood stem and stern post, as well as keel. The cap rail is maple veneer, 3 layers. Grating is maple veneer. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    7 points
  13. PT-109. Still a work in progress….
    7 points
  14. Some friends of mine got a Siren 17 sailboat. Not sure if this is a ship, but I put it in a bottle!
    7 points
  15. Anyway have completed her now and she’s finished. Bit of a problem to get the bowsprit in place and also had to do a little repair on the rudder but otherwise went fairly smoothly and I am satisfied with the result.
    7 points
  16. Time to start putting her in the bottle. The stand seen with the ship parts does not go in the bottle,it was only used as a construction aid.
    7 points
  17. My new project is in progress...
    7 points
  18. Added the sails and some rigging,and tried to copy the flags/pendants on the original church model. Stern lantern is made out of clear perplex. Everything is going to be a tight fit in the bottle!
    7 points
  19. The only plastic I used on this ship were the painted shields that adorn the outside of the fore and aft castles. Checking how she looks with masts and sails.
    7 points
  20. Painted the hull and started construction of the fore and aft ‘castles’.
    7 points
  21. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    She hit the bottle on the weekend! More fun to be had hooking everything up etc. What is the definition of insanity? Putting the Preussen into a wine bottle!
    7 points
  22. J.L.Runeberg,Porvoo,Finland.
    7 points
  23. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Now for the fun part, all of the rest of the rigging to get done! Also I have to make the jibs as well.
    7 points
  24. Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    The Main mast is done less running rigging.
    7 points
  25. DMC1964

    Yacht America 1851

    To misquote The Most Interesting Man in the World, "I don't often post build logs, but when I do, I usually do it after I've finished the model..." I'm breaking that rule with this build. We'll just see how it goes. I've decided to build the yacht America in a bottle. First, the boat is lovely. Second, I have no end of research materials available, so I should use it. Several years ago, I bought the Chappelle plans from the Smithsonian. I have the book The Low Black Schooner, which, even if you don't want to build a model, is a great book. And I have a great set of rigging diagrams and plans, so, at least from that perspective, I have what I need. I had a couple of bottles to choose from and I cleaned off the labels. I scanned an image of America from Chappelle's The Search for Speed Under Sail and scaled it to fit in the smaller bottle. Rather than monkey around with the "sea" as I did on my first ship in a bottle, I'm going for the full hull on this one. The hull lines of America are so striking that it would be a shame to just show her from the waterline up. So, off to carving a hull and seeing what's going to be needed to get it into the bottle. Dan
    6 points
  26. John Fox III

    Yacht America 1851

    Greetings Dan, I know the feeling, I have often carved hulls that were close, but not symmetrical enough. I put it down to my being right handed, it's almost always the port side that is slightly out of shape with me. The only advice I can give you is to use more templates, good idea to glue paper ones to something a bit thicker and stiffer, you got that one right. That keeps them from bending out of shape when holding against the hull. Mark the points on the keel where each template bottom should be located, and attempt best you can to hold the template perfectly vertical when checking shape. I start in the middle, then work every other template space fore and aft. Cut just a little at a time, I use an X-acto knife and #11 blade myself, At the stern it gets trickier where it undercuts. Be patient, and work slowly, when the hull seems close to the right shape, i then use sandpaper starting with heavier grits and then work down to finer stuff. I often make 3 hull block sandwiches to start with, so don't have to repeat the process again later "when" I screw one of them up. Hope that helps! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    6 points
  27. A hoy, It's been a couple of years but finally back into it! My wife's first pregnancy gave us twins, which would you believe left me little spare time... but finally this project is down off the shelf! So I made a figure head, using a copper wire frame and layers of PVA glue to give volume, then painted white. She's meant to be an angel giving flight to a dove. I re-did the main bulwarks and added capping the to top of the rear section to match. This gave me light coloured bamboo on the tops of all handrails/bulwarks. I also added some stripping along the hull to break up the otherwise bland hull. I made these out of thinned bamboo skewers and bristles out of a brush. They also conceal the join lines of the three separate hull sections pretty well too. I shaped the keel, added a rudder and made some mounts. I am in no ways ready to sculpt an angry sea, so I've gone for traditional mounts, stained to give contrast. I made a capstan using a similar method as the helm wheel. Installed just behind the main mast. Installed the cannons on deck, and the helm wheel. Some door frames to the rear cabins A skylight for the rear cabins. This I made out of brush bristles, thin square cut wood, and yellow card stock to imitate stained glass. 3 gusset braces added to the very rear section. The curved stairs to the rear section I made out of many layers of thinned bamboo skewers glued together to give the tread. I love how they've turned out. I also added some simple grating to the front section, as I thought the deck looked a little bare. I've added all the rigging to the sails and masts and drilled the holes in the deck for the lines to pass through. I'm intending for some of the lines to come out underneath where the longboat will mount. Thus covering the cut off line ends. Some other lines will come and and be glued and cut off behind the stairs. Hence, the stairs and the long boat will need to be installed as a last step, after all the rigging is done. Ready to bottle! Any suggestions on the best way to glue the hull to the glass? Is epoxy the strongest and easiest to work with? I'll post again soon showing the full sail/rigging set up. Kind regards, Caleb.
    6 points
  28. Good afternoon: Let's see if today it is possible that not a word in spanish gets through, I will be watching more than yesterday... but I still don't understand what can happen, it exceeds my logical and analytical capacity. Today the idea is to show you how I made the sea for this model. Yesterday I told you diorama and this heat is making me delirious, this boat does not have a landscape, it goes in principle for the bottle that you will see. My strategy for today is few words and many photos... you're lucky you won't have to have an aspirin omelette for dinner because of my excessive verbiage. The white paper is a template that we have verified reproduces the oval of the tinted silicone that we have put in the bottle to simulate the depth. There are no photos of the process but you will see them. If everything is fine, I usually measure six times and cut one, the boat will be one millimeter on each side with respect to the interior glass and the mast will enter the neck of the bottle half. Everything we're going to need is here... Focus your attention on a template made with plastic sanded from the paper one, you can see the exact position of the helmet in another template below. The plastic template is surrounded by a twine thread two or three millimeters thick glued, it is the one that limits the height and expansion of the silicone. Determines the working zone of our sea. My method is always to glue wood against wood, that's why I make a small square, sometimes a strip, with two glued wooden sticks that fit into the holes in the hull. In this image you can see that the hull has been wrapped in kitchen plastic, which you cannot see and it is very IMPORTANT that you remember to remove the board from the bottom of the hull, wrap it and finally nail the board back in place by drilling the plastic . One thing that I have done for the first time, I always use tinted silicone, but this time to test how it works against an already tinted background, I have tried to glue the outline of the helmet with transparent silicone to see if I get a deeper effect of the helmet. I have also taken the opportunity to put the transparent silicone that will make the breaking wave of the bow in the plastic. Silicone like two index fingers and three drops of color, to match the one already inserted... the idea is a deep Atlantic sea. Stir to equalize and without beating so as not to introduce air. We fill from the inside out, remember that we just glued the hull with silicone without dye... the entire oval flush with the twine that gives us the height. They are simulated a little bit by distributing the unevenness that the sea creates and we place the bow plastic in the arched shape that we want the bow wave. The next day. The board where the helmet goes in its place... Not even hunger moves her from there. There are no photos of how to put and paste the sea inside. Only the twine is removed from the sea. It is left glued on the sanded plastic.T The sea is rolled up with the plastic part facing out and enters alone. It is supported on the side of the bottle and with a wire, or a drinking straw, drops of silicone are placed on the sea inside and a cord where the board goes. The sea is dropped on it and it is leveled flush. I promised little words and a lot of photo, at least the second I have fulfilled. Ufff...bad. Ufff...bad. Well? Yes, her well. Ufff...bad. Ufff...bad. Ufff...bad. Ufff...very bad. the only thing perfect is that the bowsprit is a millimeter from the glass. I knew that the bottle would deform but not in this brutal way. I don't know if it's worth it put it in it... but at the moment I don't have another, we'll see. Greetings.
    6 points
  29. ‘Merikarhu’ (Sea Bear) ST-79 Ocean tug. Constructed in Brooklyn NY in 1943 served during Normandy landings 1944. Transferred to Finland 1946/47. Now a museum ship at Hamina , south Finland.
    6 points
  30. Good afternoon, let's go with some progress... ...and setbacks, that there are, we leave them for later. I carefully examine the curvatures, heights, dimensions, proportions, which would be in addition to having fun for a while because I like what I see, performing optimal quality control... I remind you that I work without plans... which for me is always a difficulty . I am going to be very insistent on this subject, but as long as it can be recycled, reused and reduced... in this case this sheet metal, less than a millimeter thick, comes from the back of a painted plywood picture, which is it separated due to the effect of humidity... I washed it well, let it dry and now I have it for different uses. Forgive the photographer who is a mall, put your finger down. With this round strip of six millimeters in diameter I hope to be able to make the railings of the railing... for this it has been immersed in very hot water one night when I get up I change the water again no matter how hot it burns and after a After a while I put it in its holder, it is one of the two hulls I made in beech, identical to the ship's pine. It is left to dry on days when there are more tasks to do I add some wooden circles on the tips of the masts and bowsprit as I have seen in a photo on the internet, although they are actually metal and a cylinder that surrounds the tip of these. I also varnished the part of the wood that doesn't turn white. Aft seat and helmsman's seat. Well, nothing that keeps your eyes working. We work the mast, it is varnished, it is drilled to pass that piece that I don't know what nautical name it has, it is a crossbar that some lines cross from the hull to the tip of the mast. Information is appreciated We have already put the railings, there are no photos, sorry, but come on, the process is easy, it was left to dry for several days, then it was verified that the curve was perfect, it was cut to the correct length and the only more laborious thing was with a knife cut the strip in two parts to obtain two half circles that make a believable railing, it is glued with pva and without further ado. We have also made the base of the bowsprit and drilled through the hull at the point through it. Greetings. ..
    6 points
  31. DMC1964

    Yacht America 1851

    I've made some progress on my America. Using John Fox's article from 1988 in Model Ship Builder, I made the hull blank. I sandwiched a thin piece of basswood between two others, establishing a keel line for the hull below the waterline. I used 0.010" styrene to establish a waterline. And then I cut another piece of basswood for the upperworks. I turned a couple of toothpicks down to 1/16" to pin them all together. I've made two templates, mounting them on basswood. Here's the side view. So now my question. I decided on the size of the ship based on the internal dimensions of the bottle. Is that the right way to think about this? I made the blank per the article: 3/4" thick, 1-1/8" wide, about 4" long. That'll make a model the same size as John's Bluenose. Bluenose's hull lines are similar to America's, but the yacht carried a lot more sail area. so the model would be taller than the inside the bottle if I built it to the same dimensions as Bluenose. So, do I build it a little bigger and find a bottle that will fit later? Or build it small and fit it into the bottle I have? Dan
    6 points
  32. Alvaro004

    TLW one a one.

    Buenas noches compañeros: he estado un poco liada... les voy a compartir un paso a paso de la elaboración de la TWL por si les sirve, mis metodos todavia no son muy finos, ahora hay otras tecnicas que uso y creo Sé aviso, este creo que fue mi cuarto barco. Como saben utilizo el traductor de Google, por lo que no voy a poner más texto que esta introducción, si alguien tiene una duda o quiere una explicación de una imagen que lo diga, con gusto trataré de ayudar. Saludos.
    6 points
  33. Greetings All, More progress on my 1:200 model of Niagara/Lawrence. Tiniest blocks I've ever made, or probably ever will. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
    6 points
  34. 6 points
  35. 6 points
  36. 6 points
  37. Thanks, John! Really looking forward to your talk in Manitowoc this year! I think I've solved the problem: file size. When I reduced the size, everything went fine. Dan
    6 points
  38. 6 points
  39. Human-Doodle

    Ahoy landlubbers!

    Hi, Just checking in and saying Hi! My name is Nils and I am a London based self employed window cleaner. I’m just completing my first build this week, it’s Titanic in a hexagonal lambs spiced rum bottle. I will create a post and show progress shots in the correct area. thanks Nils
    6 points
  40. Up to a couple of years ago all my modelling has been railway related. Wanting to do something new I have been building some wood ships and nautical wood kits. Being from Portsmouth and also living in Plymouth and working in the dockyards, all things nautical have also been an interest of mine. Now, having run out of wall space, and the smallest wood ships being about two foot long and not forgetting the height of the masts, I have decided to give ships in bottles a go as I can get more of my completed work on display.
    6 points
  41. allan sib

    allan sib

    This is my Ganges model fully rigged,though I have to confess that I blundered when adding the gun ports before the chain plates so they did not line up,so had to strip them off and add them after adding the chain plates ,lesson learned pay more attention to detail,now for sails and some deck fittings,I think I will keep her as a training ship with her deck guns removed.
    6 points
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