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  1. Roger

    Port of Gdansk

    my new item: Port of Gdansk ( Poland ) 4.5 liter bottle
    15 points
  2. Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus
    14 points
  3. Greetings All, Have been working on 2 models of the James Miller at 1:300 scale and thought I would share some progress photos and info. One of the models will be going into an 11" long sodium vapor street light bulb, the other in a wall mounted clock that resembles a pocket watch case, the latter will be static display. I've been working on the models for about 8 months now, on and off. Both hulls are split at the waterline, to allow access to the underside of the upper hull, and to fit through the light bulb opening. I decided to try something different with these models, the hulls
    13 points
  4. Continuation Artur
    13 points
  5. Finally, the building of the model has been completed
    13 points
  6. These are a few shots of my recently completed Charles W. Morgan. I'd been reluctant to post anything about this project because of serious doubts whether it would succeed. It took far too long because I made a number of poor choices and had to go back and redo a number of things. For example, this is the second hull and it took 16 whaleboats to get the 7 that finally went with the model down the bottle neck. My eyes aren't quite what they used to be either and that has made rigging a much slower process. The next project will not be as ambitious.
    13 points
  7. DSiemens

    Ship in Bottle Repair

    Well I had my first opportunity at ship in bottle repair. It was entirely different than I expected I'd do with a ship in bottle repair but I got it back together. I should have got a picture before I got it back together but when the gentlemen brought it over the mizzen main sail was floating around the bottle totally detached. I had to maneuver it in place and glue it down. Took two hours but I did it. Funny thing with glass ships. There no wiggle room.
    12 points
  8. Greetings All, The work on the card and paper clipper model continued with quite a few more sealing and sanding, with small amounts of Bondo. Once I had a decent hull I made up the keel, stem and stern posts out of multiple layers of board. After reading more online about card models I learned to saturate the card stock with thinned down poly varnish, in order to make it stiffer and less prone to fraying when sanding. It also made cutting a wee bit harder, but worth the effort as it shapes up nicer when saturated. I did this by using a large art paint brush an
    12 points
  9. Greetings All, The work on the hull progressed by sanding down all the planking, to get as smooth and fair a surface as I could. I sanded, then applied poly varnish thinned 50/50 with paint thinner until it no longer soaked in. Waited for the varnish to dry, then sanded again. I repeated this process many times. While sanding I could see areas where the planks pushed inwards slightly, and small gaps in the finish. I used Bondo glazing and spot putty, applied with a stiff piece of styrene plastic, to cover the gaps and low spots. Again, after Bondo dried the hull was sealed and sanded. I d
    12 points
  10. She's Launched!!!! It's been a while since I've been here, but slowly bits have come together. There is a photo of the ship, rigged, (almost), sitting on the table, one of my launching tool,(launch ramp??),which is modelled after the Amarti tool I used for Hannah, and one of her in the bottle, with the air pump going to get rid of any fumes from the glue. I have the mast handling tool sorted out, it seems to work on the dummy runs, and a few suitable Swann Morton blades in the post, due very soon, which clip onto an extended handle. Now I just have to rig her! Cheers
    12 points
  11. tazam0827

    Asgard

    The thread with the painted stripes is meant to represent the gap between the deck and the gunwal that I suppose allows for drainage in heavy seas. See this picture of the actual yacht. Here's my model, almost ready for the bottle.
    12 points
  12. exwafoo

    Colvic Watson 28

    A friend asked me to make a SIB of a boat that is owned by one of their friends. The boat is a Colvic Watson 28 ft as shown in Figs 1 and 2. Figure 1: The drawings Figure 2: the actual boat I had a few other photos to work from as well. I drew up some plans, shown in figure 3. Figure 3: Working plans The hull block was made and shaping started, shown in Figs 4 & 5 Figure 4: Hull block Figure 5: Shaping Started Figure 6: Basic outline. The hull is split just off centre to port and has an upper, mid (from styren
    12 points
  13. Greetings All, Here are a few photos taken while adding the ratlines to the shrouds on my James Miller models. The jib was made from 1/16" thick maple veneer, holes drilled to match the distance between ratlines. The line used was 8/0 fly tying thread, rigged as shown in first two photos. 3rd photo shows the jig fastened to the shrouds with an insect mounting pin at the top and a pair of miniature clothes pins and a small piece of bamboo split down on the bottom. CA glue was applied to all points that the ratlines behind touched the shrouds. The shrouds for these models was made from 3 pi
    12 points
  14. I’m doing two SIBs at once. One is HMS Ramillies and I’ve got a build log going for her here on BSB. But the second one has no build log, it’s a three masted barkentine with no name and here is her photo. I’m enjoying doing two ships at the same time since some aspects of the project can be done simultaneously and thus are more efficient- like melting and pouring the plasticine sea material. Otherwise it’s good to be able to turn away from one project as it gets stale and go to the other project the following day, alternating. The square rigged warship is done but not inserted and I’ve got hal
    12 points
  15. Greetings All, Latest work on my James Miller model pair. Finished up all the cabins and deck structures, first two photos show the cabins. Nest two photos show different views of the fife rails that are situated around the 3 masts. This ship had an interesting feature of ratcheting windlasses, they are the black circles just inside the windlass with the small tubes sticking out at 45 degree angle. They would turn the windlass on the down stroke and ratchet freely on the up stroke, wood or metal poles were pushed into the tube ends to operate. Never saw anything like this before and found
    12 points
  16. Hey, all. Here’s a tool for putting masts on our SIB’s. It lets you guide a mast through the neck of a bottle horizontally and then rotates the mast to vertical to its place on the hull and then releases it. Basically, it’s a small diameter brass tube with a steel wire in it that is attached to a link that pivots. I don’t intend to write a novel and I don’t think anyone wants to read one here so I’ll try my best to explain. It’s probably obvious that moving the wire causes the link (wood material) to pivot. The pivot is a straight pin that was bent to a 90 and epoxied to the brass
    12 points
  17. So, as promised I said that my second ship im a bottle attempt would be the Porthmadog built S.S Rebecca. She was the first steamer in the port, loved by the young & hated by the elders. She made weekly visits to liverpool from the port with supplies. The ship model is made from wood painted with acrylic paint. The steam, some strands of wire wool. The stand I constructed entirely from driftwood found in the local bay. The white plaque on the stand is polished bone with the name & date scrimeshawed onto it. I am fairly happy with the result. But as soon as I cork
    12 points
  18. DavidB773

    My first SIB: Dimond

    Image captures of video of the foremast installation.
    12 points
  19. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    12 points
  20. So the next part is adding on to the stern bulwarks. I cut out part of the plans to get the sizing that I needed and then cut out a piece of wood to glue in place. I soak the wood for a couple minutes and then glued it to the top of the bulwark. After I send the bulwark down I work on the rail to go on top of the stern bulwark. I cut out another 1.5 mm piece soak it for a a few minutes and then do a grain break at the very end to give that lip between the two rails. Then I glue it in place. I send that piece down to thin it out and then move on to the stern cabin.
    12 points
  21. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    12 points
  22. Shipbuilder

    Flying Foam

    Topsail schooner. Bob
    12 points
  23. Artur

    Western River

    Please find further photos
    12 points
  24. Shipbuilder

    Latest Drawing

    My latest sail plan drawing, completed today. Bob
    12 points
  25. exwafoo

    Mast Making

    Hi All, Hope you are all keeping safe. There has been a bit of talk about mast drilling and jigs, etc over the past few months. I thought I'd kill a couple of hours in lockdown putting together a screed on how I do it and the jigs I've made to help me. Hope its of interest. best Alan Mast drilling jigs..pdf
    11 points
  26. West Country Trading Ketch Bessie Way back in 2016,when the world was normalish, the Royal Yacht Club asked the European Association of ships in Bottles to help fund raise for the UK Olympic Sailing Team by building and donating SIBs that had had the sail signed by a team member. I built two SIBs of this ship, see Build Log called ‘Going for Gold Build – Bessie’, so I won’t repeat that part of the build. I actually built 3 SIBs, using the third as a trial ship for some techniques, such as split hull, that I had not used before. Up until last year it sat on a shelf unfinished. I then thoug
    11 points
  27. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Funnel goes in and then the main mast. Decided to leave off 'Daisy' and the cow shed as I thought the deck could look a bit too cluttered.( It's possible that I can add them later if I want to.) Main mast in place with no problems and then set in the foremast. The bowsprit gave me a few problems as the glue didn't set on the first attempt because the mounting hole inside is made up of a plastic and wood wafer construction, so in the end I used an epoxy glue to fix it firmly. Finally completed GB after several months work but unfortunately I didn't notice that the top flying jig rigging had tan
    11 points
  28. Working without plans or proper procedures is a bit of a chore. I had to manufacture some of my own parts like dead-eyes, braces and mast hoops. I rigged the yardarms onto hoops so that they are adjustable instead of gluing them directly to the masts as I think was the intention - which would have been hard since I don't have plans that tell me where they should be glued. So I'm either making things up as I go along or researching other models to figure out what things should look like. I've used parts left over from some other kits I've built and I borrowed the mast, gaff and boom rigging sc
    11 points
  29. tazam0827

    Asgard

    The Asgard is a gaff rigged yacht built around 1908 in Norway for Erskine Childers, English MP and Irish Nationalist executed during the Irish Civil War. The ship was used to run guns into Howth, Ireland in response to the arming of Unionists in 1914. I became interested in the ship because it was a local legend in Howth, where I lived for a few years. I drew up some crude plans from photos I found on line.I carved the hull out of Basswood Decking, gunwale and cockpit built with coffee stirrers Bowsprit, cabin, hatches and helm fashioned and painted Mizzen m
    11 points
  30. Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Set the Black Pearl inside a small half barrel with a moonlight sky as a backdrop and lit by a small battery Led light. That was the image I had when I first started the model so I'm happy with the way that it turned out.
    11 points
  31. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    11 points
  32. MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    OK! I now have a ship in a bottle! Because of the height issue, I removed my clay sea, just soaked it in water, and it eventually came away. The epoxy that held the clay in place took 10 days of soaking it acetone. Cutting the bottom of the hull off is an option if it it done before bulwarks and rigging go on, doing it afterwards I think it would be a bit of a pain! Likewise, trimming the top of the masts. I really should not have to do either. So I glued the ship directly to the glass, and then poured in the ocean. All I have to do now is make a base for it
    11 points
  33. Here are some photos of the second James Miller model. It is housed in a 9" diameter clock that was made to look like a pocket watch case. The case is actually cast bronze, quite heavy.
    11 points
  34. And finally, Jack took his place on the mast.
    11 points
  35. Starting a new build The Golden Swan based on the 1588 English Galleon as pictured in Wolfram Zu Mondfeld book "Historic Ship Models" The hull is carved from sourwood. Usually I use Holly but wanted to try a different wood. The deck will be spit from the hull so the ship will be in two pieces so it can be placed in the bottle when done. I am building her in between sessions with my Cutty Sark that I am also building. Here is a picture of The Cutty Sark I am working on. Too big to fit in a bottle.
    11 points
  36. DSiemens, this is a great choice for learning, thoroughly enjoying this build. It really is a beautiful vessel, partly because of it's simplicity.
    11 points
  37. Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Final product. I cut the port backstay trying to push down the stern into the sea, it was riding too high. I tossed the line over to the starboard side.(the not display side.) i don't know if I'll ever go in and fix the line. I don't think I can.
    11 points
  38. Greetings All, Today I share the latest work on the James Miller models. I have completed adding the bobstays, jib boom shrouds and jib boom backstays to both models. The bobstays and shrouds are made from miniature rope, made on a mini rope walk I built a year or so ago, using 3 pieces of 8/0 fly tying thread. The backstays are fake miniature chain, made from 8/0 fly tying thread tied around a #80 drill bit with double overhand knots. To keep the "chain" fairly straight I tied a second piece of thread to the first loop tied, after removing the drill bit from the hole in an 9" long piece
    11 points
  39. Onni

    Gypsy Moth IV

    After working on HMS Gannet for months felt a need to build something quick and a bit easier. Plumped on Sir Francis Chichester's, 'Gypsy Moth IV' something that I remember from my younger days! Never done a model in an upright bottle before so this was something new for me. (Thanks to Ioan for the idea) From start to finish about 27 days to complete. Split hull design. Carved a new internal stand to allow for the natural curve in the bottle base.
    11 points
  40. Greetings All, In my attempt to get realism I have been working on some ideas for sails. Rather than printing seam lines on paper, my usual method for making sails, I tried out the idea of using thread sandwiched between layers of very thin paper. It took a number of attempts, using different threads and various papers, until I came up with something I think works quite well. The photos below show first one of the hulls with the stern bulwarks added, with the boat davits, and painted black along with the top of the cap rail. Then for the sails, there are several shots showing my sail jig,
    11 points
  41. Greetings All, Finally got the hull air brushed, flat black upper hull and copper lower hull. The cap rail is still white as I have to add solid railings and boat davits before painting the rails black. Next we have the ship's boat for one model. There were two made, one for each model, using cigarette papers over a bone mold. The ribs and cap rail are plastic, the floor boards and thwarts are made from light and dark apple wood. The blocks have been added to hang the boat. Then we have the spars with their blocks attached. I try to add all the blocks and tackle to the individual parts b
    11 points
  42. In progress... On the slipway...
    11 points
  43. A few more photos and steps. Mark out where you want the gun ports. I eyeballed it. Probably not the best method but it was a quick way of doing it. After that its time to make the bulwark. I used a 1mm or 1/8th inch piece of bass wood for the bulwarks. Hold them up to the plans and mark the width. At this point the cuts are straight even though the bulwark will be curved. Cut the pice to be a little longer than the ship. Remember the length of the bulwarks curves around the ship so its a little longer than the length on the plans. From he
    11 points
  44. All ready for sea. Bob
    11 points
  45. 11 points
  46. Many thanks bluenoser! The work is slow, but, nevertheless, it is going A few days ago I was compelled to make building berth. This time the rigging turns out to be more complicated than I did before.
    11 points
  47. Colin Archer RS1
    11 points
  48. Garry M

    Newly hooked

    Hi all After a time of ‘will I or won’t I’, I have finally embarked on my bottled ship voyage. I have enjoyed reading your posts and look forward to learning some of the many secrets associated with this skilled craft. I have completed two ‘trial’ builds which have been the catalyst for my embarking on this journey.
    10 points
  49. DavidB773

    My first SIB: Dimond

    Thank you, Arup! Thank you, Mr. S., taking a look at what I'm doing here. I'm quite honored to read your opinion of what I've accomplished. I have a cork for the bottle but it needs to be sized to fit. However, I'm not going to let that get in the way of posting this!
    10 points
  50. Archibald Russell The four mast steel bark Archibald Russell was built in 1905 in Greenock by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., and was one of the last of her type to be built on the Clyde. Built for general trade, she was 291 feet long and had a beam of 43 feet and displaced 2385 tons. She was owned by John Hardie & Son of Glasgow. After years of carrying a variety of bulk cargoes around the world, she was sold to Captain Erikson who operated a fleet of sailing ships, primarily in the grain trade from Australia. Eventually she was broken up
    10 points
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