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  1. Greetings All, Have been working on 2 models of the James Miller at 1:300 scale and thought I would share some progress photos and info. One of the models will be going into an 11" long sodium vapor street light bulb, the other in a wall mounted clock that resembles a pocket watch case, the latter will be static display. I've been working on the models for about 8 months now, on and off. Both hulls are split at the waterline, to allow access to the underside of the upper hull, and to fit through the light bulb opening. I decided to try something different with these models, the hulls
    13 points
  2. Continuation Artur
    13 points
  3. Finally, the building of the model has been completed
    13 points
  4. These are a few shots of my recently completed Charles W. Morgan. I'd been reluctant to post anything about this project because of serious doubts whether it would succeed. It took far too long because I made a number of poor choices and had to go back and redo a number of things. For example, this is the second hull and it took 16 whaleboats to get the 7 that finally went with the model down the bottle neck. My eyes aren't quite what they used to be either and that has made rigging a much slower process. The next project will not be as ambitious.
    13 points
  5. Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus
    12 points
  6. exwafoo

    Colvic Watson 28

    A friend asked me to make a SIB of a boat that is owned by one of their friends. The boat is a Colvic Watson 28 ft as shown in Figs 1 and 2. Figure 1: The drawings Figure 2: the actual boat I had a few other photos to work from as well. I drew up some plans, shown in figure 3. Figure 3: Working plans The hull block was made and shaping started, shown in Figs 4 & 5 Figure 4: Hull block Figure 5: Shaping Started Figure 6: Basic outline. The hull is split just off centre to port and has an upper, mid (from styren
    12 points
  7. I’m doing two SIBs at once. One is HMS Ramillies and I’ve got a build log going for her here on BSB. But the second one has no build log, it’s a three masted barkentine with no name and here is her photo. I’m enjoying doing two ships at the same time since some aspects of the project can be done simultaneously and thus are more efficient- like melting and pouring the plasticine sea material. Otherwise it’s good to be able to turn away from one project as it gets stale and go to the other project the following day, alternating. The square rigged warship is done but not inserted and I’ve got hal
    12 points
  8. Greetings All, Latest work on my James Miller model pair. Finished up all the cabins and deck structures, first two photos show the cabins. Nest two photos show different views of the fife rails that are situated around the 3 masts. This ship had an interesting feature of ratcheting windlasses, they are the black circles just inside the windlass with the small tubes sticking out at 45 degree angle. They would turn the windlass on the down stroke and ratchet freely on the up stroke, wood or metal poles were pushed into the tube ends to operate. Never saw anything like this before and found
    12 points
  9. Hey, all. Here’s a tool for putting masts on our SIB’s. It lets you guide a mast through the neck of a bottle horizontally and then rotates the mast to vertical to its place on the hull and then releases it. Basically, it’s a small diameter brass tube with a steel wire in it that is attached to a link that pivots. I don’t intend to write a novel and I don’t think anyone wants to read one here so I’ll try my best to explain. It’s probably obvious that moving the wire causes the link (wood material) to pivot. The pivot is a straight pin that was bent to a 90 and epoxied to the brass
    12 points
  10. So, as promised I said that my second ship im a bottle attempt would be the Porthmadog built S.S Rebecca. She was the first steamer in the port, loved by the young & hated by the elders. She made weekly visits to liverpool from the port with supplies. The ship model is made from wood painted with acrylic paint. The steam, some strands of wire wool. The stand I constructed entirely from driftwood found in the local bay. The white plaque on the stand is polished bone with the name & date scrimeshawed onto it. I am fairly happy with the result. But as soon as I cork
    12 points
  11. DavidB773

    My first SIB: Dimond

    Image captures of video of the foremast installation.
    12 points
  12. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    12 points
  13. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    12 points
  14. Well I had my first opportunity at ship in bottle repair. It was entirely different than I expected I'd do with a ship in bottle repair but I got it back together. I should have got a picture before I got it back together but when the gentlemen brought it over the mizzen main sail was floating around the bottle totally detached. I had to maneuver it in place and glue it down. Took two hours but I did it. Funny thing with glass ships. There no wiggle room.
    11 points
  15. Working without plans or proper procedures is a bit of a chore. I had to manufacture some of my own parts like dead-eyes, braces and mast hoops. I rigged the yardarms onto hoops so that they are adjustable instead of gluing them directly to the masts as I think was the intention - which would have been hard since I don't have plans that tell me where they should be glued. So I'm either making things up as I go along or researching other models to figure out what things should look like. I've used parts left over from some other kits I've built and I borrowed the mast, gaff and boom rigging sc
    11 points
  16. tazam0827

    Asgard

    The Asgard is a gaff rigged yacht built around 1908 in Norway for Erskine Childers, English MP and Irish Nationalist executed during the Irish Civil War. The ship was used to run guns into Howth, Ireland in response to the arming of Unionists in 1914. I became interested in the ship because it was a local legend in Howth, where I lived for a few years. I drew up some crude plans from photos I found on line.I carved the hull out of Basswood Decking, gunwale and cockpit built with coffee stirrers Bowsprit, cabin, hatches and helm fashioned and painted Mizzen m
    11 points
  17. Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Set the Black Pearl inside a small half barrel with a moonlight sky as a backdrop and lit by a small battery Led light. That was the image I had when I first started the model so I'm happy with the way that it turned out.
    11 points
  18. Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
    11 points
  19. tazam0827

    Asgard

    The thread with the painted stripes is meant to represent the gap between the deck and the gunwal that I suppose allows for drainage in heavy seas. See this picture of the actual yacht. Here's my model, almost ready for the bottle.
    11 points
  20. Here are some photos of the second James Miller model. It is housed in a 9" diameter clock that was made to look like a pocket watch case. The case is actually cast bronze, quite heavy.
    11 points
  21. Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Final product. I cut the port backstay trying to push down the stern into the sea, it was riding too high. I tossed the line over to the starboard side.(the not display side.) i don't know if I'll ever go in and fix the line. I don't think I can.
    11 points
  22. Greetings All, Today I share the latest work on the James Miller models. I have completed adding the bobstays, jib boom shrouds and jib boom backstays to both models. The bobstays and shrouds are made from miniature rope, made on a mini rope walk I built a year or so ago, using 3 pieces of 8/0 fly tying thread. The backstays are fake miniature chain, made from 8/0 fly tying thread tied around a #80 drill bit with double overhand knots. To keep the "chain" fairly straight I tied a second piece of thread to the first loop tied, after removing the drill bit from the hole in an 9" long piece
    11 points
  23. Onni

    Gypsy Moth IV

    After working on HMS Gannet for months felt a need to build something quick and a bit easier. Plumped on Sir Francis Chichester's, 'Gypsy Moth IV' something that I remember from my younger days! Never done a model in an upright bottle before so this was something new for me. (Thanks to Ioan for the idea) From start to finish about 27 days to complete. Split hull design. Carved a new internal stand to allow for the natural curve in the bottle base.
    11 points
  24. Greetings All, In my attempt to get realism I have been working on some ideas for sails. Rather than printing seam lines on paper, my usual method for making sails, I tried out the idea of using thread sandwiched between layers of very thin paper. It took a number of attempts, using different threads and various papers, until I came up with something I think works quite well. The photos below show first one of the hulls with the stern bulwarks added, with the boat davits, and painted black along with the top of the cap rail. Then for the sails, there are several shots showing my sail jig,
    11 points
  25. Greetings All, Finally got the hull air brushed, flat black upper hull and copper lower hull. The cap rail is still white as I have to add solid railings and boat davits before painting the rails black. Next we have the ship's boat for one model. There were two made, one for each model, using cigarette papers over a bone mold. The ribs and cap rail are plastic, the floor boards and thwarts are made from light and dark apple wood. The blocks have been added to hang the boat. Then we have the spars with their blocks attached. I try to add all the blocks and tackle to the individual parts b
    11 points
  26. In progress... On the slipway...
    11 points
  27. So the next part is adding on to the stern bulwarks. I cut out part of the plans to get the sizing that I needed and then cut out a piece of wood to glue in place. I soak the wood for a couple minutes and then glued it to the top of the bulwark. After I send the bulwark down I work on the rail to go on top of the stern bulwark. I cut out another 1.5 mm piece soak it for a a few minutes and then do a grain break at the very end to give that lip between the two rails. Then I glue it in place. I send that piece down to thin it out and then move on to the stern cabin.
    11 points
  28. 11 points
  29. Many thanks bluenoser! The work is slow, but, nevertheless, it is going A few days ago I was compelled to make building berth. This time the rigging turns out to be more complicated than I did before.
    11 points
  30. Colin Archer RS1
    11 points
  31. Artur

    Western River

    Please find further photos
    11 points
  32. Greetings shipwrights, In the last few days I have been experimenting with the folding disk, it has to look right in the bottle. I' m on #4 and I think I figured it out. Meanwhile I chose one of the ships to be a static display for the shelf above my work area. Still envisioning putting the other in the bottle piece by piece. Have a Happy Thanksgiving. Or a nice Thursday for those those outside the U.S. Best regards, Jeff
    10 points
  33. Ahoy, It's been a very busy month but I finally managed to squeeze in a few hours this weekend. I masked the channel line and cut grooves down to take the bulwarks. I glued the bulwarks on too thick on purpose. This allowed me to sand them down thinner to shape and allowed me to try and make the join between the bulwark and the hull flush. I will be running a channel along the join to hide it better anyway. I spent a fair bit of time making some little cannons. The cannon barrels are from bamboo skewers turned down and blacked with a felt tip
    10 points
  34. Pride of Baltimore complete and bottled up!
    10 points
  35. And finally, Jack took his place on the mast.
    10 points
  36. John Zuch

    My "Waterwitch"

    Like you I to used Jack Needham's book for my model of the Waterwitch
    10 points
  37. The first of the two James Miller models is finally completed. Still have to finish up the light bulb stand and the stand to hold the model on the bottom of the bulb. There is a second model, at present it is at the stage of ready to start mounting the masts. The second is a static display model, so in some ways it easier to rig.
    10 points
  38. I started with the main sail. The first thing I did was to get the paper ready. There are a lot of different methods for coloring paper, coffee, tea, or paint works. I've found a very light staining of golden oak gives a good weathered effect. I wipe off the excess on the edges and lightly stain the middle. From there I traced out the sail against the model. I like to give a wind filled look which means making the sails a little bigger than they are in the plans. Once its cut to size I draw on the details. I find a light board works well for this. You can go w
    10 points
  39. An example of the frame method.
    10 points
  40. When it comes to trimming lines there is a special tool I use that makes for a really close cut. Follicle clippers from the grocery store. They run around $8. Note how straight the edge is and that it cuts off to the side. I can place that edge right on the shroud and cut the ratline super close with out cutting the shroud line. To show this look at how close the ratlines are cut at the edges of the shrouds. Something to note with these clippers. Treat the like your mothers sewing scissors. Once you use them for anything but thread the edges get bent an
    10 points
  41. And the next stage - I placed the underwater part of the hull in a bottle, poured silicone, formed a ripple and foam from acrylic gel and white paint.
    10 points
  42. For masts I use bamboo. I like it for its durability and because its in expensive. A package of bamboo scewers runs around $3 and holds enough for several ships. I cut my bamboo in section long ways and use a drawplate to get smaller round sections. I then put these pieces in a drill to smooth them out and add a bit of taper. Tapering masts and yards really adds to the realism and doesn't take to much extra time. As a cautionary note, don't spin wood in dremels. They spin way to fast and very often the wood gets off center and becomes a projectile. Drills are slower and safer.
    10 points
  43. Time to put some cannons in. Going back to the concept of putting together shapes a cannon consists of a cylinder sitting on a rectangle. For the cylinder I opened up an old cell phone charger cable and pulled out the black wire. For the rectangle I found a nice dark veneer and cut strips. I still had to thin it a bit to fit the cannons in the gun ports. Good to be aware of sizing on this part. Here it is with all the carriages glued in. If you can get a hold of or build this tool I highly recomend it. It really helps keep my length cuts consistent.
    10 points
  44. Miro

    Hi!

    Hi guys! Believe or not, first idea to make a SIB came to me about 30-35 years ago when bought a book in Polish: Flota butelkowa. Means A Bottle Fleet. And started to do a three mast schooner at that time. Finished it two years ago. It nice and quite hobby which demands a lot of skills. I believe that you agree with me, don’t you? Well… few weeks ago finished my second model (see pic) and going to do next. Hope that you will give advices along my job and we will have fun together. New project is a stage of crystallisation. ?
    10 points
  45. DavidB773

    My first SIB: Dimond

    Thank you, Arup! Thank you, Mr. S., taking a look at what I'm doing here. I'm quite honored to read your opinion of what I've accomplished. I have a cork for the bottle but it needs to be sized to fit. However, I'm not going to let that get in the way of posting this!
    10 points
  46. Heres one of my very early pirate ship builds. You can see the split at the channel. Once in it looks like a solid piece. This is what makes ships in bottles magical. Your on the right track with it. Keep it up.
    10 points
  47. A few more photos and steps. Mark out where you want the gun ports. I eyeballed it. Probably not the best method but it was a quick way of doing it. After that its time to make the bulwark. I used a 1mm or 1/8th inch piece of bass wood for the bulwarks. Hold them up to the plans and mark the width. At this point the cuts are straight even though the bulwark will be curved. Cut the pice to be a little longer than the ship. Remember the length of the bulwarks curves around the ship so its a little longer than the length on the plans. From he
    10 points
  48. All ready for sea. Bob
    10 points
  49. This was a quick build I did for a friend if mine. He had been building a Blue Jacket Constitution for the past 30 years and recently completed it. He asked for a mini sib to present to his wife at his unveiling party. The ship is 2 inches long.
    10 points
  50. Then I proceeded to final assembly of the model on the slipway with the final installation of deck elements, fixing the rigging parts that should be fixed, drawing up the rigging wiring diagram and checking everything in general.
    10 points
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