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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/16/2020 in all areas

  1. Medway Queen,heroine of Dunkirk (1940) where she rescued 7000 allied troops from the beaches. Here she is in post war livery. Now a museum paddle ship in Gillingham,Kent,England.
    3 points
  2. YouTube is a great resource. I thought about what knots I use. -cow hitch and reef knot to attach yards to masts. -Clove hitch at end of yards. -Square knot a lot. -and Figure 8 loop for masts pulls at the cross trees. Attaching a pic of a cow hitch around a yard. (Thanks to D. Siemens)
    2 points
  3. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Hi Moab, The sails are made from a man's white handkerchief stained slightly with tea/coffee then when dried I wrap it around a clean paint roller wrapped in grease proof paper before I brush it over with a diluted wood glue which when dry gives a slight curve to form the sail. The sea/ocean is simply plasticine painted with acrylic paints and modelled to resemble the sea( at least that's the idea!)
    2 points
  4. That's beautiful. Great job! Good idea on the deadeays too. They look really good.
    2 points
  5. Donald

    Mayflower

    Made and raised the Union flag and The English Cross of St. George. Trimmed the anchors a bit, pulled 'em up to the catheads and hooked up the "chains" from the hawse holes. Touched up the 2 cannons, made a new capstan. Planning on sprit sail, stern lantern and control lines to chain wales soon.
    2 points
  6. Donald

    Mayflower

    Trial and error with sails today. I first printed some with seams, telltales, reef lines etc., then sized it accordingly. Then I thought, well it's only printed on one side so I printed another set cut them out and glued together. The print lines were too dark for me, so I tried painting the sails white and weathered looking but in the end I thought it looked terrible so... I took them off and started over. I am happier with the refit. I still need to shave down the anchors a bit and clean up the hull, touch up some paint etc. but she's slowly getting there.
    2 points
  7. Charlotte Rhodes, adapted from a plan in "Modeling Ships in Bottles" by Jack Needham.
    2 points
  8. She's Launched!!!! It's been a while since I've been here, but slowly bits have come together. There is a photo of the ship, rigged, (almost), sitting on the table, one of my launching tool,(launch ramp??),which is modelled after the Amarti tool I used for Hannah, and one of her in the bottle, with the air pump going to get rid of any fumes from the glue. I have the mast handling tool sorted out, it seems to work on the dummy runs, and a few suitable Swann Morton blades in the post, due very soon, which clip onto an extended handle. Now I just have to rig her! Cheers
    2 points
  9. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Funnel goes in and then the main mast. Decided to leave off 'Daisy' and the cow shed as I thought the deck could look a bit too cluttered.( It's possible that I can add them later if I want to.) Main mast in place with no problems and then set in the foremast. The bowsprit gave me a few problems as the glue didn't set on the first attempt because the mounting hole inside is made up of a plastic and wood wafer construction, so in the end I used an epoxy glue to fix it firmly. Finally completed GB after several months work but unfortunately I didn't notice that the top flying jig rigging had tan
    2 points
  10. Folks, After reading the 3 issues of The Bottled Shipwright I am in awe of the history, and experience enjoyed by this group. That being said, please forgive my newcomers excitement if things I post are already common knowledge. I came across this book , cheap, on ebay and wow do I really, really like it as a reference for historic ships of sail. It details, quite accurately I believe, all the specific areas of historic ship model building, and explains the difference in eras, of those specific areas. I'll throw up a couple of pictures for example but as a newbie, I will be referencing
    1 point
  11. Jeff B

    Pond Yacht

    I used to race RC model yachts in a club. World Cup rules, around bouys. We were members of the AMYA and held/attended tournaments. Good times. Sometimes the guys would let me win.
    1 point
  12. Clipper. 3rd attempt. Previous 2 broke in the neck. I’m using the hinge method. 3rd times a charm. Lessons learned.
    1 point
  13. exwafoo

    Mayflower

    Hi. Donald, Nice work. Its looking very good. Going back to your comment on photography, unfortunately, macro photography will show up everything. If you think about it, a few thou out at our scales is a reasonably large proportion of the 'bit', while if it was at, say, 100 to 1 like some of the large kits are, it would never be noticed. Nice to see you got the Union Flag historically correct and named correctly as well. Looking forward to seeing it in the bottle. Alan
    1 point
  14. IOAN

    Mayflower

    A true work of art! 👍
    1 point
  15. Always scary when things go awry. Glad you managed to get it out damage free. That's not easy. Best of luck in the next go.
    1 point
  16. DSiemens

    Mayflower

    Such a beautiful ship. You've done a great job so far.
    1 point
  17. That's so much fun. Great job!! It's a great looking little ship in bottle.
    1 point
  18. DSiemens

    SS Great Britain

    Now that's a bottle full! Great job Oni. That's a beautiful ship. It was fun to see the photos of the pieces coming together.
    1 point
  19. That looks great!! Paper is an interesting method. I did one similar a long time ago and at a much smaller scale. Had a guy in our club show us how to make long boats with a wood mold. He put a bit of wax on the mold and placed paper over the top brushing it with water downed white glue. After it dried it could be removed from the mold and you'd have a hollowed out hull. I took the idea and made a version of the Queen Annes Revenge. The rigging wasn't great but the hull looked good. Having done a few minis since I should try it again. The part I found interesting was you need to b
    1 point
  20. Moab

    SS Great Britain

    I'm new to this site and am overwhelmed with the incredible craftsmanship. Your ship is incredible!!! Please escuse me if these questions aren very basic. What did you use for sails? What do you use for crearting the ocean?...Moab
    1 point
  21. A carboy or boccioni bottle maybe but they both have pretty small bottle necks in proportion to the chamber size. The ship would have to be in a lot of pieces. It would look awesome though.
    1 point
  22. JesseLee

    Mayflower

    I really love how detailed this model looks! Jesse
    1 point
  23. Moab

    1st miniature sib

    Fantastic build...Moab
    1 point
  24. Dam Dam! Plan "A" didn't go to as planned! Just have to sort out a few threads, and figure out Plan "B"!! Cheers, Mick Just a quick update, I've almost sorted them all out, and at least no damage was done, inserting or un-inserting!! Mick
    1 point
  25. Thank you Onni, She is only 75ft? long, and had quite tall masts, being a barque, they could be. Cheers Mick
    1 point
  26. Looking good. Impressive height for the masts. Nice work!
    1 point
  27. Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Flipper 650DC made for a client.
    1 point
  28. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    All the hull parts fitted through the bottle neck relativity easily but I had tremendous trouble to lift the front end of the starboard top piece over the front lug to secure it (Second photo). It actually took me about an hour before it snuggly slipped in place (Third photo).Luckily I had already designed these pieces to fit together without being glued otherwise it would of been a disaster had they had glue on them. As you can probably see some of the fragile photo etched railings received some damage in my struggles but they are pretty easy to repair. I then put in the engine room and then
    1 point
  29. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    For some idiotic reasons after I had glued the main sail, it went into an inverted curve (looking like the wind was blowing from the front)The solution;I scrapped off the sail and re glued it the other way round so it now has a nice curve without even me trying anything high tech to get it looking like that!Constructed the lifeboats and all six are fixed (three each side)to a thin plastic strip which will then have to be fixed to the side of the hull of GB when she is inside the bottle.Made the 'red duster' flag from an old hankerchief of which I have inserted and glued very thin wire inside o
    1 point
  30. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Completed all deck furnishings (the small skylights took ages)and moved forward to the masts and rigging. I am going to rig her with half sails up but no top sails as per the drawing at the begining of this build. As you may of noticed I made a new engine room skylight and cut out the space in the hull so that you should be able to get a glimpse of the engine room machinery through the skylight.Shrouds and ratlines I make on my little jig which are bonded with super glue and white wood glue to simulate the block and tackle.
    1 point
  31. Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Continued with some of the deck features.'Daisy' the Guernsey cow with her cow shed amongst other items. The two Trottman anchors are made out of wire and plastic.Not happy with the engine house skylight so I will probably make a new one.
    1 point
  32. joe100

    HMS Glatton, 1918, 1/1500

    Greetings. I’d like to share my latest model, HMS Glatton as she appeared in the final hours of the war. The model is completely scratch built to 1/1500 scale or 125’ to 1”. The model is made from boxwood, brass, and the sea base is carved and painted wood. Paint is from ScaleColors of course. If you’d like to see more of my ships models they’re all on my website www.josephlavender.com I started this model a little before finishing Duilio, so total build time was about a month. Glatton, 5,746 tons displacement and her sister ship Gorgon were originally built for Norway but they wer
    1 point
  33. DSiemens

    Pond Yacht

    I actually attach a 6lb fishing line. I got those cheapo fishing rods that fold down so they look like pens. Then I can carry everything in pretty easy. It sails out and when I decide I need to change tack I give the line a pull. When I'm done I real the whole thing back in.
    1 point
  34. Jeff B

    Thread Recommendation

    I buy my fly tying/ fly fishing materials from J Stockard Fly Flishing @ JSflyfishing.com I also go to my local sporting goods, outdoorsman shop. Like Mr.Fox said, 3/0, 6/0, 8/0 size. Black, tan, brown, white (for stripe). Waxed is good. I rewax EVERY line again because drilled holes are rough, not smooth on the thread and will fray it when the thread moves in and out. Stockard has beeswax. I've also learned to run the thread through the wax (I use a block of beeswax I got from a beekeeper) before threading the needle. The needle tends to strip odd the excess wax. I just ch
    1 point
  35. exwafoo

    Swap Head tool

    Hi All, I mentioned in the build log 'Miniature Clipper' that I had made a rigging stand from Circuit Board Stand Offs or Spacers. I've been asked to elaborate what I meant by these. So here goes. These are a plastic spacers used to securely mount electrical circuit boards in an enclosure, ensuring that they are insulated from the case (if its metal) and to allow cooling air to circulate. They cost me about £2 on the web, and came in a nice compartmentalised box. This shows the pieces included. I think the thread is M3. Its a hard plastic, probably nylon.
    1 point
  36. exwafoo

    Swap Head tool

    Hi James, All Thanks for your comments No patent pending. Would not make any difference to a certain Far Eastern Country who would just copy and market it if they felt it would make money, like they have with so many other peoples ideas, Anyway, I've drawn it up and coupled with the phots you can build one if desired. The idea can always be adapted to suit whats available, Best for now Alan
    1 point
  37. Thank you Gentlemen. For the last couple of weeks, I've been trying to make the ship in the wrong order! Normally, on a larger scale model, you plank the hull, then do the decks and bulwarks, in about that order. I really should plank the decks, then the bulwarks, then plank the hull. So I have the hull planking ready to rock and roll, the bulwarks are just about ready, as are the planks for the decks. However, on close examination of the hull, the fore-mast is way off the center line, which will make the planking, and the rest of the ship, look really odd! It is
    1 point
  38. Recently one of the guys on the forum noticed a tool I had made showing up in the background of one of the photos I had posted about my current build project. He really liked it and said he was going to rip off my idea. The Nerve! LOL. I made this tool years ago to assist me in putting my ships in there bottles and it really never occurred to me that maybe it had some merit for others in our art. Anyway to make a short story short, I told James, that I would draw up a print and then he could make his own. As I was contemplating doing this, it had been on my mind for some time to make a better
    1 point
  39. Jeff B

    Bottle find

    Found this at antique consignment store today. 1960's Log Cabin syrup. Embossed Indian on back, wheat oval on front to show off ship!! $7 steal! I found a couple @ etsy for around $13-14.
    1 point
  40. Putting together my first SIB in nearly 40 years, all of a sudden I needed a pair of long tweezers that I didn't have. I looked them up in Micro Marts online catalog and saw that they were $13 plus shipping, plus time. Well that wouldn't due. So undaunted, I thought to myself a trip to Home Depot, and I'll be back in business in no time. These tweezers are 12 inches long, 3/8 inches wide, and 1/16 thick and tapered to a 1/8 inch square tip. They are easy to make, cheap and work great. Because aluminum is soft I can bend an angle or radius at the tip in the future if need be. I picked
    1 point
  41. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YTNYzHCksE This video, I believe, is the work none other by Heather Gabrielle Rogers. She is a true artisan of our hobby! https://www.folkartinbottles.com/artists/artists-i-r/35-gabrielle-rogers
    1 point
  42. DSiemens

    German Cutter 1910

    Getting her in was tedious but she finally made it. Be sure to get solid thread blocks it's horrible when they break.
    1 point
  43. DSiemens

    German Cutter 1910

    I use sketch paper for sails. It's thick so it holds a nice curve for a good billowed sail look. The lines were drawn on with a mechanical pencil.
    1 point
  44. DSiemens

    German Cutter 1910

    Here's a better picture of my rigging box. I made it so I could safely transport my ships to my modeling club and back. It's worked out great. And more of the rigging.
    1 point
  45. DSiemens

    German Cutter 1910

    I then carved out the hull and painted the bottom. Got a little paint on top but that sands off easily enough.
    1 point
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