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Gwyl Blaser

What's on your workbench?

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I found these plans for the Continental brig Lexington 1776, in the back of a file folder. 

The hull resembles a Bermuda sloop- with raised gunnels. 8 guns per side (oh joy!). 

There is a photo of it in the same bottle I used last. A 1960's Log Cabin Syrup. I found a couple online.

Here we go...again. 

 

image.jpg

Edited by Jeff B
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Hi Jeff, the Brig Lexington is extensively covered in Charles G Davis "The Built Up Ship Model", which I think can still be found. I built a SIB version back in 1980 for a wedding gift for a cousin which I considered my best best work. I put it in a very unique "Rock n Rye" bottle which has a oversized neck and a nice rectangular shape with a nicely scrolled neck. I've wanted to recreate one for a while and have had a carved up and painted hull sitting on a rigging board for some years. Unfortunately I didn't make a water line hull and the full hull is a bit much for most bottles so I can't decide what to do with my oversized hull. I was thinking of making a miniature in a glass box instead. Maybe. Anyway once in a while I try to transcribe the dimensions from the book plan to a smaller scale so that I can complete the masts and spars, etc. It's on the back burner. The SIB plan for the future and might always will be. Thanks for the inspiration.

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Was an interesting find, Lubber. 

I don't know where I got them from. I never used a color printer cartridge. There isn't a .com any where on it, indicating its origin, yet it's a computer reproduction. It's also to sized to fit the bottle.  A1960's Glass Log Cabin Syrup. 

Im going "waterline." 

Cheers,

Jeff

 

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Lubber, I found the origin of the plans for the Lexington today @folkartinbottles.com. The maker is Clay Rakes in a section labeled "plans" you can download them. 

You might be able see, the waterline Mark is quite clear. 

Hope you can do it soon! 

Edited by Jeff B

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New project:

baltimore clipper; Pride of Baltimore.

90mm length

75mm height at mainmast

10mm wide

waterline cut. 

Decided to try bent , rounded staple drilled , glued and jammed in the front of the bow at keel, as shown in Bruce Foxworthy's story about the Anders /Niels find passed down through time.

b/r,

Jeff

The Waterwitch turned into a shipwreck. The Lexington is in drydock, waiting for the bottle. No rush. 

I'm going to use

the old Waterwich bottle. 

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A picture is worth a thousand words. 

Lexington: good thing she's not bottled up.

1. I can NOW see I need to put the second sail on the formast UNDER the forward sails. 

2 .there needs to be more curve on the lower sail on the Main mast. 

Edited by Jeff B

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On 9/24/2019 at 1:46 PM, Jeff B said:

Decided to try bent , rounded staple drilled , glued and jammed in the front of the bow at keel, as shown in Bruce Foxworthy's story about the Anders /Niels find passed down through time.

Jeff

As it turns out ,I'm about to start a build of a Baltimore Clipper called "Harvey" for my next adventure. Haven't really considered using the wire construction loop at the keel line like Anders, and his father used so well. But the more I think about it now, the more I'm realizing that that construction loop is a really handy way to lead lines from under the hull forward and out the front of the bow and bottle. I'm going to incorporate it's concept as well in this build and see where it goes. Should be interesting. Keep in mind that the evidence of the three debacles of ships that I have of Anders, also used this construction loop for the jib and for-stays threads. I don't know that I will use it for those lines in my build. Just sayin.

Bruce

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On October 5, 2019 at 7:36 PM, Bruce Foxworthy said:

Jeff

As it turns out ,I'm about to start a build of a Baltimore Clipper called "Harvey" for my next adventure. Haven't really considered using the wire construction loop at the keel line like Anders, and his father used so well. But the more I think about it now, the more I'm realizing that that construction loop is a really handy way to lead lines from under the hull forward and out the front of the bow and bottle. I'm going to incorporate it's concept as well in this build and see where it goes. Should be interesting. Keep in mind that the evidence of the three debacles of ships that I have of Anders, also used this construction loop for the jib and for-stays threads. I don't know that I will use it for those lines in my build. Just sayin.

Bruce

Bruce, last night, after testing my mast fold on the hinges, I realized that the foresail lines running through the eye at the keel was putting too much stress on the lines. Decided to pull them out through  the bowsprit only and leave the keel lines running through the keel loop. Namely, the 2nd mast (main) pull through the deck, and the boom swings on the gaffs sails that keep them from swinging. 

I like that it keeps them together. It still has a function. 

Now on to Alan's jig with staple push off launch. 

Best regards, 

Jeff.

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Jeff:

If you look at these pics you'll see that it appears that Anders and his dad did take the jib stays down threw the carved bowsprit and then threw the construction loop at the keel before then going out of the bottle. It kinda gives the impression of looking like the bob stay lines etc. in a way. The building technique they used was not an accurate detail of things so much as it was an impression of a ship. My conjecture that those lines were buried and cut off below in the sea material itself has yet to be proven. I'm only suspecting that this is how they fixed (or glued) these structural lines. I'm thinking they were not using any glue in their builds other than the sea material to hold the lines tight and the masts etc. in place. That would make their processes origination probably very old indeed. 

I'm only going to utilize the construction loop on my ship to guide the masts lines forward and out. My masts will have a line attached at the bottom to pull and hold them in place in the divot seat I put on the deck for their locations.

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Black Pearl. Built one for my eldest daughter seven years ago so thought I had to try to make a better one. Thanks to Alan and Caleb for a bit of inspiration to re-visit the Pearl. She's about 50% completed but still have much to do,masts ,spars,sails etc....

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