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Bottled Ship Builder
Gwyl Blaser

What's on your workbench?

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Hi John,

I am going to build the model in a bottle of one of the ships USCG also.  Have you draw the logo of USCG or used the decal ?

 

Best Regards!

Igor.

Greetings Igor,

 

I don't really recall exactly how I did the logo on both sides of the Eagle, but if I were doing it again I would draft/draw it with software. I would then print it in color on a piece of normal printer paper, then attach a sheet of cigarette paper directly over the printed image, I use clear scoth tape on two edges of the paper, opposite edges. I then stick the paper back into my inkjet printer, making sure it is oriented so it prints on the same side it did the first time, and then print it again. This time it should print directly in the cigarette paper, which you can then cut out and glue to your hull. The paper is super thin, so leaves almost no ridges on the edges when glued onto the hull. In my case, I know my inkjet printer ink is water soluble, so I normally spray a light coat of clear varnish, to seal the paper and keep any colors from running.

 

Hope that helps, though  bit late as I didn't see your question.

 

Anchor's A Weigh!

John Fox III

Ladysmith, WI

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Thank you PeterN67!

I can send to you the plans of this boat, if you need they.

I spoke in detail about this construction on my FB page - https://www.facebook.com/igor.brehuntcov/media_set?set=a.515911531894302.1073741849.100004263786475&type=3

and on the forum Nautical Research Guild's MSW - http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/11150-koch-russian-polar-ship-by-igorsky-bottle-11000/

 

Best Regards!

Igor.

 


 

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These are a few shots of my recently completed Charles W. Morgan.  I'd been reluctant to post anything about this project because of serious doubts whether it would succeed.  It took far too long because I made a number of poor choices and had to go back and redo a number of things.  For example, this is the second hull and it took 16 whaleboats to get the 7 that finally went with the model down the bottle neck.  My eyes aren't quite what they used to be either and that has made rigging a much slower process.  The next project will not be as ambitious.

 

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My eyes aren't quite what they used to be 

 

My age induced inability to focus on small objects forced me to buy an Opti-Visor with a #3 lens (1.75X magnification) a few years ago. Last year I bought another with a #5 (2.75X) lens. I find the #3, which has a focal distance of about 12 inches / 30 cm, optimal for most bench work and the #5, about 6 inches / 15 cm focal distance, excellent for fine detail work.

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Even with a #5 lens in an optivisor I have trouble seeing #8 flyline, ordered a #10 lens last week, am curious to see how it does. I'll be brushing off the rigging with my eyelashes most likely. I'm about sick of flyline anyway, and have dug out my cotton, which I'll be switching back to for my next model.

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My age induced inability to focus on small objects forced me to buy an Opti-Visor with a #3 lens (1.75X magnification) a few years ago. Last year I bought another with a #5 (2.75X) lens. I find the #3, which has a focal distance of about 12 inches / 30 cm, optimal for most bench work and the #5, about 6 inches / 15 cm focal distance, excellent for fine detail work.

I started working under a fluorescent loop at my desk something like 10 years ago, and bring a magnifier loop with me on trips to the Peabody ship model club each week.  Bought both through Micro Mark and just checked the portable loop - it's an Opti-Visor, and the lens has a #5 on it.  With the whaler done, I am returning to a project started in 2004.  The distinction between what I obviously could see quite well then and now is not encouraging!

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Hi Alex!

I am continuing to marvel to your model! It's just great!

 

Igor.

 

 

Alex,  She is beautiful!  I am in awe of your craftsmanship.  Just wonderful!

 

Gwyl

 

 

Beautiful work Alex! As usual first rate ... Jeff

Thank you all for your kind words!  Heather Rogers kindly set me a picture of her recently completed Charles W.Morgan, also in a 5 liter bottle just like mine, and it is a remarkable model!  Same subject, same size, but very different approach and very successful.  I urge you all to see if you can track down a picture of this model and enjoy it!

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Fine looking models Gwyl. I have thought of doing a multi piece hull myself but have never tried it. I have been asked to do a model of a small steam, mail, inter island cargo ship. My problem would be the superstructure. How would you disguise the joints after assembly in the bottle? 

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Fine looking models Gwyl. I have thought of doing a multi piece hull myself but have never tried it. I have been asked to do a model of a small steam, mail, inter island cargo ship. My problem would be the superstructure. How would you disguise the joints after assembly in the bottle? 

 

 

Hi Bernard,

 

With the ships that have the different pieces on the horizontal plane,  I use the white styrene plastic as the water line and that blends in real well.  If done with care, it looks like a waterline stripe.  On the hulls that have the split on the vertical plane, I place the keel one one piece and when put together it is not noticeable.  As for the deck on the vertical splits, if you  are scribing deck planks or using real planks, the split line can be hidden that way.  These techniques are not mine and I owe the concept and my schooling of this concept to John Fox III

 

Gwyl

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Hi Bernard,

Yes, I agree with Gwyl.

I'm trying to use the kinds of solid wood (pear, hornbeam). This gives me the opportunity to make smooth the edges of the hull's parts, and they tightly are connected to each other.

 

Best Regards!

Igor.

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