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Spanky

Pirate type Galleon

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Good find.  This ship looks like a lot of fun.  The height of the hull could be an issue.  There's ways to get around that but you'll have to plan that right away in this build. 

The most common method is splitting the hull.  For ships like this where it appears your doing the whole ship I'd split it either right at the channel or at the waterline.  The reason for that is you can use the channel or the waterline to hide the split.  

For a waterline split I would paint the bottom half white up to the split.  The reason for this is old ships up to the 1750's were sealed bellow the water line with whalefat and tallow.  The mixture would appear white.  They did this up to the waterline.  Later ships had copper plating which was more expensive but made for faster ships.  

If you decide to split thw hull now is the time.  Its easier to work with a split hull from the beginning rather than cut a nice looking ship later.  Once you have the two pieces put a two pegs one one side and holes for the pegs on the other.  This will help the piece come together exactly where you want it in the bottle.  

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Thanks for the input. Curious your method for cutting the hull in 2 pieces. I have some nice tools/saws that are inaccessible for a few more weeks. Scary thought splitting but I def. want to try. Not sure if this is the one though. This was my plan, Picture A, labels masts and decks once raised. Picture B shows how I was going to lay the masts down. Picture C shows the caps I would place after the masts are up. If this seems silly please let me know, my feelings wont be hurt. These first few builds are to be learning experiences for me and I welcome any and all input.

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Learning process it is... So far I have redone the atea around the bowsprit 3 times. I am fairly happy with the hull but I have decided to redo everything else. The railings are too inconsistant, I'm going to try styrene for that. The whole rear end has been mind bending for a newbie not sure of what he's doing. The balcony, ( please forgive my ignorance of common ship language) in the rear I have some ideas about how to do better.  At any rate through trial, error and reading posts from you fine folks, we'll get there eventually. The great thing about this forum is that you are not satisfied with just O.K., when the informationis here to do it better. Cheers!

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In my imagination, I think the balcony area(?) at the rear of an old galleon, with a beautiful lady, a glass of wine and fair winds would be the most romantic thing ever.  Redoing the rear, it looks a mess right now. Part of my issue is the unconventional way I'm dividing it up to get in the bottle.

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I think she's looking great.  I think styrene would be a good option.  I've never used it but I really like what I've seen others do with it.  I need to order me some and try it out one of these days.  

Speaking of materials a trait I've seen in great ship in bottle builders is to always be on the lookout for new materials.  Whether it's styrene, watch gears, wire insulation, or most recently for me paint brush bristles.  There's a lot of odd materials that work well as parts of your ship.  For instance get a two inch paint brush cut a couple bristles off and make ladders out of them.  

Ship parts and names come with time.  As you get deeper into researching particular ships you'll get more accustomed to them.  As far as the back balcony stern decks or stern section works.  If you want a lot of technical names here's a photo.  

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I like that you mentioned what you imagine doing on the ship.  That's one of my favorite parts of building ships in bottles.  Imagining how it might have been, what I would do if I was there.  The adventure of it all.  It's a lot of fun. 

It's all about trial and error.  You'll get her in eventually.  

 

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She's been a brain bruiser up until now. I actually expect more trouble with the rigging when trying to pack her through the bottle opening. Its like a series of puzzles all wrapped up into a ship in a bottle. The work you guys do is really inspiring, awesome tips and tricks and I appreciate you freely sharing with us newbies.

 

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Edited by Spanky

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My favorite painting. The story behind the artist and this painting is so interesting. The end of the era where sailing was dominant, this fantastic old warship being pulled into the yard by a side wheel steamer thus ushering in the new age of mechanical power. The real one is in London, I think at the British National Museum. Love the ship in bottle, it's very cool. Thanks for posting.

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Spanky,

A very nice job indeed. Its a bit late for advice now, but if you plan to split the hull, its a lot easier if you start off with a 'composite block'  made up from separate, close fitting pieces pegged together. If you plan the 'split' along, say, the waterline or a whale, it helps hide it. The pieces can be pulled together in the bottle using control threads and the pegs. If you want some small, very thin saws the look here - http://www.radubstore.com/  - I have some of the tools from here and can vouch for  their efficiency. They also keep an edge. The first saw blade I used lasted about a year being used on various types of wood (hard and soft) and on brass rod and tube when making tools. 

Looking forward to more

Alan

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Thank you that is very helpful. I wondered about saw blades etc. Still plugging away but I fully anticipate problems. I think my next one will follow your method above. I got fired up about this method being a rookie before exploring experienced builders advice however, I do enjoy a challenge. Stay tuned...

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Strangley I dont know that we have a thread covering rigging or rigging techniques.  

There are two main parts the stamding rigging and the running rigging.  The standing rigging is for structural support amd does not move.  The running rigging moves the yards and sails so it runs through blocks.  

To this point you've done a great job on the standing rigging.  This includes the back stays, shrouds, ratlines, and fore stays.

What hasn't been added is the running rigging.  Is this what you would like to know more about?  

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I guess I'm curious about how and where and why the rigging might run through hull and why. Also the way rigging is used at the tips of the booms. Do they run through boom tips to top of mast and down to other boom tip? Are they tied off at boom tips or allowed to slide freely through holes in boom tips and mast top to the deck and/or through deck to other side and up again? I have Dan Bergs book, and "Sailing in glass", as well as a pretty fair selection of S.I.B. in my collection, that have various rigging techniques. The plans for this galleon,I pilfered from Google images and they did not include a rigging diagram so I'm really just winging it through trial and error.

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5 hours ago, Spanky said:

Quick question for everyone, I really don't have a great feel for rigging, its pros and cons, as well as different methods. Can anyone point me to a thread or article that may enlighten me? Thank you!

The rigging, rigging and sails of ships of the XVIII century  Marquardt K.Kh.

Anderson, Roger Charles. The Rigging of Ship. In the days of the sprritsail topmast, 1600-1720

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