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Bottled Ship Builder

exwafoo

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exwafoo last won the day on April 19

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  1. Good for you taking on the challenge. I wouldn't have gone anywhere near it. Too much fragile glass in there to cause more damage. Well done Alan
  2. Bruce, Have a look at the 'Rigging Wiget' PDF attachment I uploaded in the Bermuda Sloop Build. Its the method I use and gives good consistent results. Al
  3. Hi Bruce, All. Plasticene. Gained fame when Aardman Animations used it to make the Wallace and Grommit characters. In the UK its trade name is now 'Newplast'. It comes in a variety of colours in 1kg blocks (which makes it expensive on shipping so I go to an art supply shop) however it does do a lot of SIBs. The block is about 12 x 2 x 1.5 inches in size and is made up from a number of ' round section rods/extrusions which can be peeled off as required. This is useful for mixing colour. eg, I take an inch of blue, and add, say, 1/4 inch of green and 1/8 inch of black. mix well.If this is the colour of the sea you want, that's the ratio to use. Adjust until happy. I only have blue, green, white and black. You do not need a lot of black to darken, its a very intense dye. Does not need baking, the heat of your hands softens it and it stiffens up when not being worked. Assuming the bottle is going to be on its side, I choose the best side of the bottle, then I mark on the outside of the bottle the level I want, keeping the lower seam level with the top of the sea. This helps hide it and moves the other seam to just the other side of the top of the bottle so that it does not stand out as much. I PVA a strip of paper with the ship's details, date of bottling, my details, etc on the inside bottom, with the print facing out. Once dry, the plasticene can go in. I use 'sausages' fed through the neck then flattened using whichever tool is best for the job. My new favourite is a length of stainless steel rod that detached from a badly made barbie grill, with one end bent at right angles, the ends having been ground flat and smooth. The glass can play tricks on your eye so have an occasional look through the neck as the plasticene goes in. Once the basic sea is in, then shape the waves, put the hull in, make the recess, add foam etc, and remove the hull. The plasticene never really hardens, just stiffens up, so grips the hull nicely during trial fits, but releases easily enough to get the hull out again. I tend to work with split hulls so the bottom can stay in when finished. I have started to coat the sea with slightly dilute PVA to give it a gloss shine. It takes a few coats. I also glue the hull in as well. I have always found holding the SIB in the bottle whilst working on it a bit of a problem. I acquired an Amati SIB kit at our convention (I'll do a build log eventually), and it shows way of holding the SIB in the bottle that I'm going to try. It consts of a 'C' shaped piece of brass on the end of a rod. The 'C' is the shape of half the hull, from bow to stern, with the other half being thread from the far end of the 'C', through a hole at the fwd end and out of the neck, the whole being a type of lasso. It would allow the SIB to be held, manoeuvred, positioned and then released. Excuse bad drawing, but it should get the idea over. Another method I saw on a video (can't remember which one) was to use a length of dowel between the SIB and the top of the inside of the bottle, basically just jamming it in place. (never tried this) I've never noticed the plasticene causing any condensation. I also found this link and I've been trying to work out if the stuff could be used in a bottle. AK water gel Have a good Easter break Alan
  4. I was beginning to worry a bit as all I could get was 'Unknown Domain'. Guess it took longer to evict the gremlins than estimated. Al
  5. Hi There, I thought it may have been an early SIB by Leon Labistour who with his wife lived in Robin Hood's Bay and produced many quality SIBS. Leon passed some time ago, however I know his wife through the European Association of Ships in Bottles. I've contacted her and this is the information Pat replied with. "Hi Alan. No, it's one from the factory in the next village, Fylingthorpe. They made millions of aspirin bottle models, all farmed out to piece workers. They advertised as RHB because nobody had heard of Fylingthorpe. The factory was called Ship Models and was run by a guy called Milsom.Glad the owner of the model likes it!cheers, Pat." Hope this helps you out. Best Alan
  6. There's an article in the Bottled Ship Wright Journal (see under 'Clubs' above) on this subject that may help you out a bit. Alan
  7. Hi Bob, You should find lots to help you on this site. Al
  8. Another superb SIB. I'll have to try resin sea sometime. Alan
  9. Commiserations. I've been there. You will do a better job on the repair. Alan
  10. Hi All, I've attached an article I produced for Bottleship a few years ago on a Jig for making ratlines and railings. It may help out. It helped me. Alan Rigging Widget v3.pdf
  11. All, Thanks for the likes and comments. Much appreciated. It started life as my first attempt using one of the set of plans ( the Collier Brigantine) in Leon Labistour's Book; Making Ships in Bottles - I started to add and change things as I went for practice. As John said, more of an upgrade. The deck planking is drawn in Powerpoint and printed. I've attached it below if anyone wants to us it - just shrink and grow as required. I now use scored wood or cut planks. The sea is plasticene 'varnished' with several coats of diluted PVA glue to give it a shine, however I studied photos of waves, wind direction and wakes plus my own observations when I was at sea. I was trying to get the wind and sea coming from the port quarter, can't have too big waves or the sails would be reefed/furled or the ship would be right over. But it was time to retire it to a happy life in a bottle, and use another as a practice SIB. All the best for the New Year to everyone. Alan Planking.pptx
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