Jump to content
Bottled Ship Builder

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/09/2019 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    exwafoo

    Colvic Watson 28

    A friend asked me to make a SIB of a boat that is owned by one of their friends. The boat is a Colvic Watson 28 ft as shown in Figs 1 and 2. Figure 1: The drawings Figure 2: the actual boat I had a few other photos to work from as well. I drew up some plans, shown in figure 3. Figure 3: Working plans The hull block was made and shaping started, shown in Figs 4 & 5 Figure 4: Hull block Figure 5: Shaping Started Figure 6: Basic outline. The hull is split just off centre to port and has an upper, mid (from styrene) and a lower. The aim is to give sharp horizontal paint lines for the boot topping, Figure 7: Cabin made, under-coated and the planking. I made the planking from watercolour paper, printed on the PC with different weights of line thickness and shade. I used watercolour paint to try different shades of ‘wood’ colour, then picked the one that looked best at this scale. Figure 9: Top-coated The lower hull sections were painted separately, royal blue for the boot topping and red oxide for below the waterline. Figure 8: Sea started. The sea was made from plasticine, with a description of the SIB and makers name label under it. Figure 10: Starting the woodwork and masts. I used a red hardwood veneer for the woodwork, Small pieces were reinforced with thin CA glue before cutting and sanding to shape. Once attached to the SIB I used diluted clear acrylic varnish on them. The masts were made from brass tube and rods. This SIB had the luxury of actually having a large hinge at the foot of the mainmast. The main and mizzen sails are of the modern variety that are slotted into rails on the mast and are furled on a rotating assembly on the boom. The foresail is furled around a rotating steel forestay. Cutting the slots in the tubing was ‘fun’. I used a small photo-etched saw from http://www.radubstore.com. Took a while but it worked, Figure 11: Main mast Figure 12: Most of the woodwork fitted Figure 13: Masts and sails I used some type of translucent parchment that my wife gave me for the sails. Stitching was simulated using a black pencil, and they were coloured with watercolour, This allowed them to retain the translucent effect, They were a bit waxy, and I had a bit of trouble getting them to stay stuck in the slots on the masts. They held a good shape though. Figure 14: Rigging Underway I used a silver coloured thread for the rigging to simulate the stainless steel on the real boat. The railings were made from brass rod and painted chrome. Figure 15: Almost done. Windows ‘fitted’ I used DIY water slide decals for the windows and name. This is the first time I’ve tried this and have been pleased with the result. A pack of 5 A4 sheets of decal material cost about £5 and I’ve used half of on sheet. First I printed a couple of different sizes and colours on paper for trialing next to the SIB for size and effect. Then printed out 3 sets of the chosen ones on my ink jet, to allow for slip ups. When dry, a couple of light coats of clear acrylic varnish was sprayed over them. Once dry, the decals are cut out, placed in a saucer of warm water and when they float off of the backing are applied using a wet paintbrush and very gentle use of tweezers, left to dry then varnished over to seal and protect them. They went on very nicely first attempt. Figure 16: Ready for bottling Figure 17: In the bottle. By special request, the lighthouse is an attempt at Walney Island Lighthouse at the north end of Morecambe Bay where the owner sails to sometimes. Regards to all Alan
  2. 11 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    The Asgard is a gaff rigged yacht built around 1908 in Norway for Erskine Childers, English MP and Irish Nationalist executed during the Irish Civil War. The ship was used to run guns into Howth, Ireland in response to the arming of Unionists in 1914. I became interested in the ship because it was a local legend in Howth, where I lived for a few years. I drew up some crude plans from photos I found on line.I carved the hull out of Basswood Decking, gunwale and cockpit built with coffee stirrers Bowsprit, cabin, hatches and helm fashioned and painted Mizzen mast rigged. I tried making hinges to attach the gaff and boom, and it worked fairly well so far, but doesn't look particularly authentic Main mast rigged. I used Thread blocks for the first time, and I'm liking them! A little more work on the hull, I'm using painted wire loops as places to attach the shrouds. Not entirely convinced of that yet. As a beginner, I'm always looking for constructive criticism and ways I can improve, so please don't be shy!
  3. 11 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  4. 11 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    The thread with the painted stripes is meant to represent the gap between the deck and the gunwal that I suppose allows for drainage in heavy seas. See this picture of the actual yacht. Here's my model, almost ready for the bottle.
  5. 11 points
    Here are some photos of the second James Miller model. It is housed in a 9" diameter clock that was made to look like a pocket watch case. The case is actually cast bronze, quite heavy.
  6. 11 points
    DSiemens

    Ship in Bottle Repair

    Well I had my first opportunity at ship in bottle repair. It was entirely different than I expected I'd do with a ship in bottle repair but I got it back together. I should have got a picture before I got it back together but when the gentlemen brought it over the mizzen main sail was floating around the bottle totally detached. I had to maneuver it in place and glue it down. Took two hours but I did it. Funny thing with glass ships. There no wiggle room.
  7. 10 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Built in secrecy by John Laird in Birkenhead, England in 1862 for the Confederate States Navy Alabama became a feared raider; sinking or destroying many Union vessels until she was finally sunk herself by USS Kearsarge near Cherbourg, France June 19th 1864.In 1984 the wreck of the Alabama was discovered by a French minesweeper in the western approaches of Cherbourg roads at a depth of 60 metres (200 ft). I will do this build log in more or less real time with 'warts and all' (mistakes) just to show that our hobby is not so easy or straight forward as it sometimes seems.Select a bottle (which determines size of ship) and construct a simple stand for it.Had some old wood laying around that I thought would be good to use but actually wasn't,cuts badly and doesn't sand well.Cut out the deck using a 0.4 mm wood veneer that I will sand down and stain later on.
  8. 10 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus!) This build is going to take me months, as I have to learn how to do and make everything. So any comments, criticisms, pointers where I'm going wrong, etc will be more than welcome. Thanks. Mick
  9. 10 points
    joe100

    USS South Carolina, 125’ to 1”

    After about a month of work, my 1/1500 scale, fully scratch-built USS South Carolina model is finished. The model is entirely built from scratch. For more info, visit my website, www.josephlavender.com The hull and turrets are made from boxwood, the balance of the details are mostly brass, but I did use some styrene, and the funnels are turned brass. The decks were planked with basswood, mast rigging was made from tungsten wire. The ship’s boats are made from boxwood, brass, and stainless steel sheet. The ship is painted using Stynylrez black primer with Vallejo acrylic for both the color coat and top matte coat.
  10. 10 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Today I got all the deck furniture done.😁
  11. 10 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Black Pearl. Built one for my eldest daughter seven years ago so thought I had to try to make a better one. Thanks to Alan and Caleb for a bit of inspiration to re-visit the Pearl. She's about 50% completed but still have much to do,masts ,spars,sails etc....
  12. 10 points
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    Greetings shipwrights, In the last few days I have been experimenting with the folding disk, it has to look right in the bottle. I' m on #4 and I think I figured it out. Meanwhile I chose one of the ships to be a static display for the shelf above my work area. Still envisioning putting the other in the bottle piece by piece. Have a Happy Thanksgiving. Or a nice Thursday for those those outside the U.S. Best regards, Jeff
  13. 10 points
    Trying to fathom out what to put on deck as I can't find any info or pictures of this ship, it appears to be a merchantship so it's artistic licence time. Started with a hatch, from a thin piece of walnut ply left over from a ship kit I've been doing. Drilled some 0.5mm holes and just trying to square them out.
  14. 10 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  15. 10 points
  16. 10 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    Pride of Baltimore complete and bottled up!
  17. 10 points
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    OK! I now have a ship in a bottle! Because of the height issue, I removed my clay sea, just soaked it in water, and it eventually came away. The epoxy that held the clay in place took 10 days of soaking it acetone. Cutting the bottom of the hull off is an option if it it done before bulwarks and rigging go on, doing it afterwards I think it would be a bit of a pain! Likewise, trimming the top of the masts. I really should not have to do either. So I glued the ship directly to the glass, and then poured in the ocean. All I have to do now is make a base for it, and she can go onto the shelf. Cheers Mick
  18. 10 points
    John Fox III

    How do you make ratlines?

    Greetings All, Here are a few photos taken while adding the ratlines to the shrouds on my James Miller models. The jib was made from 1/16" thick maple veneer, holes drilled to match the distance between ratlines. The line used was 8/0 fly tying thread, rigged as shown in first two photos. 3rd photo shows the jig fastened to the shrouds with an insect mounting pin at the top and a pair of miniature clothes pins and a small piece of bamboo split down on the bottom. CA glue was applied to all points that the ratlines behind touched the shrouds. The shrouds for these models was made from 3 pieces of 8/0 thread made into rope on my miniature rope walk. The final photo shows the finished job, after cutting the ratlines at the outside edges of the shrouds. Hope that helps!! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  19. 10 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    'Viggen' (Thunderbolt) Cabin cruiser.
  20. 10 points
    And finally, Jack took his place on the mast.
  21. 10 points
    IgorSky

    What's on your workbench?

    Schooner ATLANTIC in progress...
  22. 10 points
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    Checking some clearances just to be sure!
  23. 10 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Had to check how she looks stuck in the ice!
  24. 10 points
    John Zuch

    My "Waterwitch"

    Like you I to used Jack Needham's book for my model of the Waterwitch
  25. 9 points
    Ahoy, I'm attempting my first SIB! I'm basing it off Alan's (exwafoo) Black Pearl plans. But more with a USS Constitution colour scheme. It is to go into a fittingly named, Captain Morgan - Black Spiced Rum bottle, 77mm internal diameter with an 18mm neck ID. I've taken inspiration in terms of aesthetics and build techniques from many of the build logs on here. I really want the ship to fill the bottle, as you say, so I have slightly stretched the plans to make the ship longer. I'm too scared of splitting a hull down the middle into left and right, so I will split it at the waterline, and add a small section for the rear high section, see sketch. It will be too tight to have fold down masts this way, so I will assemble them in the bottle and rigging and shrouds will pass through the hull, in a similar fashion to David's W. H. Dimond (DavidB773). I like the idea of the full ship hull being displayed, so I won't be doing a sea. Thus, the lines that need tensioning can't come out under the waterline... I'm thinking I will pull them up through the deck, glue, trim, and cover with deck items, like life boats, grating, etc. I'm trying to familiarise myself with all the terminology, and methods of rigging. Please feel free to pick apart my sketched plans below and let me know of any improvements or things to watch out for. Also, even though I will most likely be painting the hull, should I buy some Basswood to make it out of? Does it make thing a heap easier? I'm currently planning on using some Tasmanian Oak I have left over. It's a commonly available hardwood timber down here in Australia. Kind Regards, Caleb. Some methods of how I intend to do the masts and yards. Are loops required for the top of the square sails all the way along the length of the yard? Or were they only ever held at the corners/ end of the yards? How I plan to split the hull in three to make it fit through the neck. Showing how the rigging can tensioned through the deck. Is this mostly accurate? Showing Yard rigging.
  26. 9 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    Slowly building her up, scuppers, more planking. I have been playing with this for a couple weeks and this is the point I am at currently.
  27. 9 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    It occurred to me that I never finished this build log. Didn't want to leave you all hanging. I'm sure you were on the edge of your seat! I wasn't super happy with the results. But in the interest of sharing our disappointments as well as our triumphs, here it is. I should have spent more time smoothing the hull after I made some design changes, The proportion of the masts wasn't quite right and I think I should have included the topsails. Also, if you're going to make your ship heel, make sure it heels towards the front of the bottle. Otherwise it hides a lot of the deck features and makes it less interesting. On the plus side, I like the way the lighthouse on the bluff looks, and I finally figured out a Turk's Head knot!
  28. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Well I've been so frustrated with not building anything because of this or that dead end, or this or that distraction, that I decided to go back to my roots and build a simple sloop so I could at least get going. I chose the" America", because years ago I made a,"Model Shipways" model of it. At the time I remember it took me nine months to build it. Working on it a few hours a night after work nearly every day. I decided to take my model out of it's case and photograph it so I had good references and I took the lines from the book I have called, "The Story Of Sail". So here's some pics of the model I made years ago.
  29. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    So here she is on her stand. I'm so glad she turned out okay. Regards Bruce.
  30. 9 points
    She floats! Now that was a tight squeeze 😂. Hull is now glued down with pva, once that has dried I will start to fit the masts and shrouds and sails one set at a time starting with the mizzen, then the main, and finally the foremast.
  31. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Well I'm making progress even though it's not much, I'm getting there little by little.
  32. 9 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Set the Black Pearl inside a small half barrel with a moonlight sky as a backdrop and lit by a small battery Led light. That was the image I had when I first started the model so I'm happy with the way that it turned out.
  33. 9 points
    Spanky

    Da Seamans Sloop

    Well folks, I am going to retire on January 2 so I thought I would get started on a project to help keep me from getting bored, I have had a few failures lately so I'm getting back to basics with no fancy hull splits or crazy ideas for this one. I am loosely basing this on a Carolina sloop but have taken quite a bit of artists license already and am naming this, " Da Seamans Sloop " as a thinly veiled nod to D. Siemans inspirational Bermuda Sloop build.
  34. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    I decided to give James Rodgers technique of putting a diluted coating of PVA on my sail material and see how that worked out for me . Nothing ventured nothing gained. I think his build is La Madonna or something like that in the build logs . I really should get my facts straight but I hardly have time to make this entry. Anyway I did it a little differently by taping my cloth down on top of a piece of wax paper and then brushing the glue onto it. I put it next to a heat register to dry and it kinda turned out okay I guess. I can form the shape to the sails and that seems to hold but we'll see how this whole thing progresses. Back in the day I use to fold my cloth in half with a piece of sizing material in between and then iron it. Worked out great except my sails were pretty thick which I didn't like too much. I also did some rigging on my bowsprit. More later.
  35. 9 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    The 'Pearl' in pieces....
  36. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  37. 9 points
    Started rigging the shrouds on the masts, these strips will be cut to short lengths and glued inside bulwarks when inside the bottle. Trying to get a suitable green paint to match the picture is proving troublesome, mixed some yellow in 3 times now to lighten it but every time it dries to dark, so I’ve given up, that’s the colour now, take it or leave it!😂
  38. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    These next few pic are of a brass semi circle seating area that go around the helm that I turned on my mini lathe. It kinda looks like a horse shoe laying on the paper there. I used a piece of bandage to represent the decking underneath it. It's a work in progress. I'll keep you posted on my progress.
  39. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Now here's some pics of the hull as I was carving it.
  40. 9 points
    joe100

    SMS Seeadler, 83’ to 1”

    My latest little creation, SMS Seeadler as she appeared early in her career in 1917. The model is made almost exclusively from boxwood and brass. The sails are a fine tissue paper that has been primed and painted, the rigging is several grades of tungsten wire. The sea base was made from carved basswood, then painted and sealed with epoxy resin.
  41. 9 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    And she's done! Completed today. Please bare in mind this is not a copy of any real tea clipper but just 'a ship in the bottle'.
  42. 9 points
    I made more thinner rigging yarns, made new stay ropes, finished the running rigging, added the tiller, the flag on the bowsprit, painted the underwater part with copper and reassembled the whole structure on the slipway
  43. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  44. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    I came back
  45. 9 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    I decided to make a little diorama and have the Asgard sailing around the Baily Light on Howth head on its way into the harbor. I decided I didn't really like the red wire I used to make the gantry and railing, but it was already in the bottle by the time I decided. Oh well...
  46. 9 points
    I just recently responded to a non related question that, bluenose, presented me and realized that I had forgot to mention this oops issue I had in my recent builds discourse. There were so many of these that it's just a blur now. I'm laughing inside right now cause I know we've all been there. Anyway, hopefully the lesson learned here will save some others from heading into the same disastrous conundrum. That issue is, basically, if you are going to build for inside a PINCH bottle, remember there is very little wiggle room inside at the bottle's top. Ordinarily this is never a problem in most bottles, but because the pinch is a pyramid inside your top sails are going to be effected by the narrowness of the glass inside on top. In my scenario as you can see in the picture I had healed my hull too far before the masts were fully erected when I glued the hull in place. Once the epoxy had hardened and I fully erected the masts, my topsails crashed into the glass. POOPS! Needless to say I couldn't have a continuity in my ships trim. I guess most people don't see it but a sailor would for sure. Because I wanted a reaching tack set up on my ship, I should have glued my hull down off center on the bottom, a bitt, in order to have things work out for that point of sail. So basically what I'm saying here, as with any build, MEASURE MEASURE MEASURE your widths especially inside these critters. Thank's, Bruce
  47. 9 points
    Greetings All, At last the first James Miller model is finished in the light bulb. I use a special built holding stick to insert and raise the masts on the models. This stick has a clamping method to hold tension on the lines when tightened, and is narrow enough that I can invert the model and glue all the lines beneath the upper hull. I did have one problem with this first model, when I started the two models I carved the first one, the light bulb model, out of basswood the second was carved out of solid maple. The problem is that with all the carving and length of time between start and finish, nearly two years, the upper hull of this first model warped so that the ends were lower than the center. During final trials I found the problem, and tried to fix it by sanding the bottom of the upper hull at the bow and stern. However, this could only be done slightly without damaging the upper hull, so there ended up being a slight gap between upper and lower hull, most evident in the center. The second model's maple hull did not warp. Thinking on it now, I should perhaps not have used a solid piece of basswood for the upper hull, but instead should have used two outer pieces of solid basswood, with a thin piece glued down the center, this just might have kept the hull from warping when carving away the top and bottom areas. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  48. 9 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    HMS Waterwitch is done. Just need a proper bottle. I used the plans/ instructions in Jack Needham's Modeling Ships In Bottles.
  49. 9 points
    Then I connected all the parts of the boat on the slipway
  50. 9 points
×
×
  • Create New...