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  1. 12 points
    exwafoo

    Colvic Watson 28

    A friend asked me to make a SIB of a boat that is owned by one of their friends. The boat is a Colvic Watson 28 ft as shown in Figs 1 and 2. Figure 1: The drawings Figure 2: the actual boat I had a few other photos to work from as well. I drew up some plans, shown in figure 3. Figure 3: Working plans The hull block was made and shaping started, shown in Figs 4 & 5 Figure 4: Hull block Figure 5: Shaping Started Figure 6: Basic outline. The hull is split just off centre to port and has an upper, mid (from styrene) and a lower. The aim is to give sharp horizontal paint lines for the boot topping, Figure 7: Cabin made, under-coated and the planking. I made the planking from watercolour paper, printed on the PC with different weights of line thickness and shade. I used watercolour paint to try different shades of ‘wood’ colour, then picked the one that looked best at this scale. Figure 9: Top-coated The lower hull sections were painted separately, royal blue for the boot topping and red oxide for below the waterline. Figure 8: Sea started. The sea was made from plasticine, with a description of the SIB and makers name label under it. Figure 10: Starting the woodwork and masts. I used a red hardwood veneer for the woodwork, Small pieces were reinforced with thin CA glue before cutting and sanding to shape. Once attached to the SIB I used diluted clear acrylic varnish on them. The masts were made from brass tube and rods. This SIB had the luxury of actually having a large hinge at the foot of the mainmast. The main and mizzen sails are of the modern variety that are slotted into rails on the mast and are furled on a rotating assembly on the boom. The foresail is furled around a rotating steel forestay. Cutting the slots in the tubing was ‘fun’. I used a small photo-etched saw from http://www.radubstore.com. Took a while but it worked, Figure 11: Main mast Figure 12: Most of the woodwork fitted Figure 13: Masts and sails I used some type of translucent parchment that my wife gave me for the sails. Stitching was simulated using a black pencil, and they were coloured with watercolour, This allowed them to retain the translucent effect, They were a bit waxy, and I had a bit of trouble getting them to stay stuck in the slots on the masts. They held a good shape though. Figure 14: Rigging Underway I used a silver coloured thread for the rigging to simulate the stainless steel on the real boat. The railings were made from brass rod and painted chrome. Figure 15: Almost done. Windows ‘fitted’ I used DIY water slide decals for the windows and name. This is the first time I’ve tried this and have been pleased with the result. A pack of 5 A4 sheets of decal material cost about £5 and I’ve used half of on sheet. First I printed a couple of different sizes and colours on paper for trialing next to the SIB for size and effect. Then printed out 3 sets of the chosen ones on my ink jet, to allow for slip ups. When dry, a couple of light coats of clear acrylic varnish was sprayed over them. Once dry, the decals are cut out, placed in a saucer of warm water and when they float off of the backing are applied using a wet paintbrush and very gentle use of tweezers, left to dry then varnished over to seal and protect them. They went on very nicely first attempt. Figure 16: Ready for bottling Figure 17: In the bottle. By special request, the lighthouse is an attempt at Walney Island Lighthouse at the north end of Morecambe Bay where the owner sails to sometimes. Regards to all Alan
  2. 11 points
    Working without plans or proper procedures is a bit of a chore. I had to manufacture some of my own parts like dead-eyes, braces and mast hoops. I rigged the yardarms onto hoops so that they are adjustable instead of gluing them directly to the masts as I think was the intention - which would have been hard since I don't have plans that tell me where they should be glued. So I'm either making things up as I go along or researching other models to figure out what things should look like. I've used parts left over from some other kits I've built and I borrowed the mast, gaff and boom rigging scheme, so now the model is part 18th Century Long Boat, part 19th Century Baltimore Clipper and part 20th Century fishing schooner - a real "Frankenboat". Actually I now refer to it as my "Plague Ship". The photos don't do justice to the amount of work I put into it. I had to stop at this point after my hand cramped up while trying to belay the lower yardarm. I can't figure out if this yardarm is suppose to have a sail on it or was it just a brace? I have no sail plan for it but found sail plans for all the rest. I also took the liberty of making a boom for the main foresail since I can't believe that it wouldn't have had one but none was included in the plans. I rigged the peaking, up lift and throat halyards as if it were a fishing schooner. The model looks a little sparse without the jib sails but I think I'll leave them until after I make the mainsail, main top sail and jumbo. This way if I run low on sail cloth I can just show them furled. It sure is a lot of work for a model that isn't going to win any prizes for accuracy. If the way to make a first rate model is to not be afraid to tear out inferior work, I should have thrown this thing away after I planked it wrong! I even made a few mistakes that I should have known better about but I don't have any extra materials to redo work with. I have just about enough heavy cord left to make the shrouds on the main mast without having to mix materials. I now have an elevated respect for professional model makers. I might as well consider this model a practice run for the next time I make a model.
  3. 11 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    The Asgard is a gaff rigged yacht built around 1908 in Norway for Erskine Childers, English MP and Irish Nationalist executed during the Irish Civil War. The ship was used to run guns into Howth, Ireland in response to the arming of Unionists in 1914. I became interested in the ship because it was a local legend in Howth, where I lived for a few years. I drew up some crude plans from photos I found on line.I carved the hull out of Basswood Decking, gunwale and cockpit built with coffee stirrers Bowsprit, cabin, hatches and helm fashioned and painted Mizzen mast rigged. I tried making hinges to attach the gaff and boom, and it worked fairly well so far, but doesn't look particularly authentic Main mast rigged. I used Thread blocks for the first time, and I'm liking them! A little more work on the hull, I'm using painted wire loops as places to attach the shrouds. Not entirely convinced of that yet. As a beginner, I'm always looking for constructive criticism and ways I can improve, so please don't be shy!
  4. 11 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  5. 11 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    The thread with the painted stripes is meant to represent the gap between the deck and the gunwal that I suppose allows for drainage in heavy seas. See this picture of the actual yacht. Here's my model, almost ready for the bottle.
  6. 11 points
    Here are some photos of the second James Miller model. It is housed in a 9" diameter clock that was made to look like a pocket watch case. The case is actually cast bronze, quite heavy.
  7. 10 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Built in secrecy by John Laird in Birkenhead, England in 1862 for the Confederate States Navy Alabama became a feared raider; sinking or destroying many Union vessels until she was finally sunk herself by USS Kearsarge near Cherbourg, France June 19th 1864.In 1984 the wreck of the Alabama was discovered by a French minesweeper in the western approaches of Cherbourg roads at a depth of 60 metres (200 ft). I will do this build log in more or less real time with 'warts and all' (mistakes) just to show that our hobby is not so easy or straight forward as it sometimes seems.Select a bottle (which determines size of ship) and construct a simple stand for it.Had some old wood laying around that I thought would be good to use but actually wasn't,cuts badly and doesn't sand well.Cut out the deck using a 0.4 mm wood veneer that I will sand down and stain later on.
  8. 10 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus!) This build is going to take me months, as I have to learn how to do and make everything. So any comments, criticisms, pointers where I'm going wrong, etc will be more than welcome. Thanks. Mick
  9. 10 points
    Ahoy, I'm attempting my first SIB! I'm basing it off Alan's (exwafoo) Black Pearl plans. But more with a USS Constitution colour scheme. It is to go into a fittingly named, Captain Morgan - Black Spiced Rum bottle, 77mm internal diameter with an 18mm neck ID. I've taken inspiration in terms of aesthetics and build techniques from many of the build logs on here. I really want the ship to fill the bottle, as you say, so I have slightly stretched the plans to make the ship longer. I'm too scared of splitting a hull down the middle into left and right, so I will split it at the waterline, and add a small section for the rear high section, see sketch. It will be too tight to have fold down masts this way, so I will assemble them in the bottle and rigging and shrouds will pass through the hull, in a similar fashion to David's W. H. Dimond (DavidB773). I like the idea of the full ship hull being displayed, so I won't be doing a sea. Thus, the lines that need tensioning can't come out under the waterline... I'm thinking I will pull them up through the deck, glue, trim, and cover with deck items, like life boats, grating, etc. I'm trying to familiarise myself with all the terminology, and methods of rigging. Please feel free to pick apart my sketched plans below and let me know of any improvements or things to watch out for. Also, even though I will most likely be painting the hull, should I buy some Basswood to make it out of? Does it make thing a heap easier? I'm currently planning on using some Tasmanian Oak I have left over. It's a commonly available hardwood timber down here in Australia. Kind Regards, Caleb. Some methods of how I intend to do the masts and yards. Are loops required for the top of the square sails all the way along the length of the yard? Or were they only ever held at the corners/ end of the yards? How I plan to split the hull in three to make it fit through the neck. Showing how the rigging can tensioned through the deck. Is this mostly accurate? Showing Yard rigging.
  10. 10 points
    A hoy! I have been working on the masts, yards and ratlines. I bought some fly tying silk and it is very fine. However it is not a single strand, but multiple ultrafine threads laid up together. They are not braided together, which means they easily fray and seperate. But I'm reasonably happy with the results I've got for the ratlines. Shroud lines are standard sowing thread. I set the shrouds up with the correct number of strands and angle, then overlaid the silk ratlines. With tape holding everything in place I dabbed super glue all over it, then absorbed/wiped up the excess glue. Following Onni's advice, I will fix the shroud lines to the mast now, and then glue the base of them to the hull sides later. I made each side of the shrouds on the same strands. This allows me to simply fold the shrouds in half and tie to the mast under the platforms. I've noticed a lot of folks drill holes in their masts and yards to pass rigging through, however it sometimes requires larger mast/yard diameters to allow a through hole. I've chosen to try and keep the mast diameters small, and taper my yards in an attempt to be scale. It means I can't drill through them, I've tried to no success with a no.75 drill. So I'll have to come up with another solution for running rigging between the yard tips, I think it will involve thread blocks. I've experimented with yard braces. It works well I think. There is a small thread block tied to the mast and the yard braces passes through it. When the yard is pivoted to be parallel with the mast (for bottle entry) the line goes slack. When the yard is then pivoted to perpendicular the line goes back to tight. Convenient geometry of triangles and pivot points. My latest problem is how to make the rear cabins. I need to build them up because I haven't carved them out. For shaping the actual windows I can't cut timber panels accurately enough, nor does the grain of the wood allow it. So I have experimented with two methods of creating windows: One is to stamp the shape. So I made a little metal punch to stamp the shape of the window onto a piece of wood that I can then glue to the sides and back. The second is to try and imprint the shape of the windows onto a piece of wood. I bent some tin to shape and sharpened its edges. A light tap imprints the profile. Neither of these methods produce amazing results but it's better than nothing. Does anyone have a way of reliably repeating the exact same cabin window shape? My next major tasks are to work on the prow detail and stairs on the deck. Hope you're all staying safe. Regards, Caleb.
  11. 10 points
    joe100

    USS South Carolina, 125’ to 1”

    After about a month of work, my 1/1500 scale, fully scratch-built USS South Carolina model is finished. The model is entirely built from scratch. For more info, visit my website, www.josephlavender.com The hull and turrets are made from boxwood, the balance of the details are mostly brass, but I did use some styrene, and the funnels are turned brass. The decks were planked with basswood, mast rigging was made from tungsten wire. The ship’s boats are made from boxwood, brass, and stainless steel sheet. The ship is painted using Stynylrez black primer with Vallejo acrylic for both the color coat and top matte coat.
  12. 10 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Set the Black Pearl inside a small half barrel with a moonlight sky as a backdrop and lit by a small battery Led light. That was the image I had when I first started the model so I'm happy with the way that it turned out.
  13. 10 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Today I got all the deck furniture done.😁
  14. 10 points
    The wheels on the gun carriages reminded me of a trick I used to keep track of cannons.
  15. 10 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Black Pearl. Built one for my eldest daughter seven years ago so thought I had to try to make a better one. Thanks to Alan and Caleb for a bit of inspiration to re-visit the Pearl. She's about 50% completed but still have much to do,masts ,spars,sails etc....
  16. 10 points
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    Greetings shipwrights, In the last few days I have been experimenting with the folding disk, it has to look right in the bottle. I' m on #4 and I think I figured it out. Meanwhile I chose one of the ships to be a static display for the shelf above my work area. Still envisioning putting the other in the bottle piece by piece. Have a Happy Thanksgiving. Or a nice Thursday for those those outside the U.S. Best regards, Jeff
  17. 10 points
    Trying to fathom out what to put on deck as I can't find any info or pictures of this ship, it appears to be a merchantship so it's artistic licence time. Started with a hatch, from a thin piece of walnut ply left over from a ship kit I've been doing. Drilled some 0.5mm holes and just trying to square them out.
  18. 10 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  19. 10 points
  20. 10 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    Pride of Baltimore complete and bottled up!
  21. 10 points
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    OK! I now have a ship in a bottle! Because of the height issue, I removed my clay sea, just soaked it in water, and it eventually came away. The epoxy that held the clay in place took 10 days of soaking it acetone. Cutting the bottom of the hull off is an option if it it done before bulwarks and rigging go on, doing it afterwards I think it would be a bit of a pain! Likewise, trimming the top of the masts. I really should not have to do either. So I glued the ship directly to the glass, and then poured in the ocean. All I have to do now is make a base for it, and she can go onto the shelf. Cheers Mick
  22. 9 points
    John Fox III

    Paper Mache Hulls

    Greetings All, I had the idea of taking a method for making ship's boats I developed and testing whether it might work for much larger hulls. It was all experimental, so I wasn't taking photos as I worked, but since the idea worked out well I redid all the work covering it with photos to show how. Some of you may have seen my work with ship's boat hulls being made by using a plug of the hull shape, covering that plug with cigarette papers whetted with diluted white (pva} glue. Believe I have a video showing how this is done on Vimeo, do not have the URL for that but you can look it up on their site. Basically, laying the whetted paper over the plug, then using a wet toothpick to smooth it down tight to the entire plug, folding the paper over at bow and stern. After waiting 24 hours for the glue to dry/harden, adding another layer. For most ship's boats I would do 4 layers of paper. I would then cover the paper with either cyanoacrylate glue or varnish to harden it. Excess paper was cut away at the top of the bulwarks, and then the paper hull was popped off of the plug. The biggest problem with repeating for more than a single boat of the same shape and size was that cutting the excess paper sometimes cut the plug top, so I added a piece of shim brass of .005" thick to the top of the plug. Photos below show some views of this work, including finishing the interior of the boats with thin wood or plastic pieces. In some cases I used 0.015" thick maple veneer to plank the outside of the boats. These boats ranged from 1/2" to 1-1/4" long. More to follow in subsequent posts.
  23. 9 points
    I've finally finished the main mast and rigging. The small scale of the model forced me to approach the build from the bottom to up; from the front to the back and from the inside to out, so not everything gets put in place the way a real ship would be built. I would normally leave details to the end but something like the ensign was easier to apply while the main mast was off the model. The ensign is a 30 star US flag (circa 1850), something I wanted to add to balance the made-in-China stigma of the kit. Some of the tensioning in the rigging might also have been tighter if I didn't need to build in this sequence. The next step is the making and mounting of the four jibs, whose dimensions I need to double check against the dimensions of the model. These should go fairly quickly and I think I'll have enough of the supplied sail cloth to get me through. I find that photographing the model and making these postings forces me to examine my work more closely which helps me find mistakes and do a better job.
  24. 9 points
    Hafid

    Bermuda Sloop (DSiemens tutorial)

    This is the ship finished. I made some mistakes, such as not measuring the width from the bottle, so the mast was smaller that it should be, but i like the result. I hope you like it.
  25. 9 points
    Try drilling any holes in the masts and yards before taking down to size. I also use a small dab of thinned varnish (acrylic is good and available in small bottles from hobby shops) or CA glue to strengthen the hole. Re-drill when dry, then size the mast. I use a home made drill guide (shown below). Its made from a bit of brass right angle, a small flat filed on top as shown and a number of holes for different bit sizes drilled in it. If you want to drill into the end of a dowel, a small countersink on the underside, and tapering the end helps. Have fun and stay safe Al
  26. 9 points
    I'm just about done with the deck details. I included as many upgrades, embellishments, improvements and details (also mistakes) as I dared. I had some materials left over from two other models that I put to use. I early abandoned all hope of historical accuracy and the scale of the model is too small for true accuracy so I decided to make the model "my own": I upgraded the cannon barrels and carriages and lashed them down; I included two swivel guns in the aft; I fashioned cannon balls from pin heads and mounted them into the ball racks; I made belaying pins from brass wire (I also had some left-overs); I made jackstay eyebolts from brass wire and put the rings in the ring boxes; I found some chain for the anchors and I improved the bowsprit construction. I am most particularly proud of the 21 ft ship's boat that I fashioned out of scrap planking and made a mini planked-up boat out of. This was my first attempt at trying to do this and I planked the boat onto a false frame that I then later chiseled out. I decided to go with the "ship that's been to sea look" than the "ship that came right out of the ship yard" look so somethings look ragged, worn, rusted and damaged (at least that's my excuse!). I'm finishing the bowsprit rigging now. I also fashioned some deadeyes from 3/16" dowel (maybe not the right scale) and mounted them on brass wire chain plates and decided on a "double channel" mounting for them because they would be too difficult to rig if I mounted them against the side boards. On to the foremast next!
  27. 9 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    Slowly building her up, scuppers, more planking. I have been playing with this for a couple weeks and this is the point I am at currently.
  28. 9 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    It occurred to me that I never finished this build log. Didn't want to leave you all hanging. I'm sure you were on the edge of your seat! I wasn't super happy with the results. But in the interest of sharing our disappointments as well as our triumphs, here it is. I should have spent more time smoothing the hull after I made some design changes, The proportion of the masts wasn't quite right and I think I should have included the topsails. Also, if you're going to make your ship heel, make sure it heels towards the front of the bottle. Otherwise it hides a lot of the deck features and makes it less interesting. On the plus side, I like the way the lighthouse on the bluff looks, and I finally figured out a Turk's Head knot!
  29. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Well I've been so frustrated with not building anything because of this or that dead end, or this or that distraction, that I decided to go back to my roots and build a simple sloop so I could at least get going. I chose the" America", because years ago I made a,"Model Shipways" model of it. At the time I remember it took me nine months to build it. Working on it a few hours a night after work nearly every day. I decided to take my model out of it's case and photograph it so I had good references and I took the lines from the book I have called, "The Story Of Sail". So here's some pics of the model I made years ago.
  30. 9 points
    She floats! Now that was a tight squeeze 😂. Hull is now glued down with pva, once that has dried I will start to fit the masts and shrouds and sails one set at a time starting with the mizzen, then the main, and finally the foremast.
  31. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Well I'm making progress even though it's not much, I'm getting there little by little.
  32. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    I decided to give James Rodgers technique of putting a diluted coating of PVA on my sail material and see how that worked out for me . Nothing ventured nothing gained. I think his build is La Madonna or something like that in the build logs . I really should get my facts straight but I hardly have time to make this entry. Anyway I did it a little differently by taping my cloth down on top of a piece of wax paper and then brushing the glue onto it. I put it next to a heat register to dry and it kinda turned out okay I guess. I can form the shape to the sails and that seems to hold but we'll see how this whole thing progresses. Back in the day I use to fold my cloth in half with a piece of sizing material in between and then iron it. Worked out great except my sails were pretty thick which I didn't like too much. I also did some rigging on my bowsprit. More later.
  33. 9 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    The 'Pearl' in pieces....
  34. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Turned out okay, I think. It gets painted black along with the rest of the hull. Boy this working small is tedious as hell. You certainly can't have any coffee nerves going or you'll be screwing up like crazy. LOL.
  35. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  36. 9 points
    IgorSky

    What's on your workbench?

    In progress...
  37. 9 points
    Started rigging the shrouds on the masts, these strips will be cut to short lengths and glued inside bulwarks when inside the bottle. Trying to get a suitable green paint to match the picture is proving troublesome, mixed some yellow in 3 times now to lighten it but every time it dries to dark, so I’ve given up, that’s the colour now, take it or leave it!😂
  38. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    These next few pic are of a brass semi circle seating area that go around the helm that I turned on my mini lathe. It kinda looks like a horse shoe laying on the paper there. I used a piece of bandage to represent the decking underneath it. It's a work in progress. I'll keep you posted on my progress.
  39. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Now here's some pics of the hull as I was carving it.
  40. 9 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    And here are some pictures of the bottle I hope will work and the stand I have roughly made up.
  41. 9 points
    Getting there ! Slow progress as spent more time trying to trace this ship. It is definitely documented as a merchant ship but can’t find any surviving plans or pictures, so apart from this stamp the rest of the decks fittings are a total guess. Here’s the story so far, needs a bit more shaping and sanding prior to paint, so have started on the masts and yards. This is is how I bend planks and other wood items, I soak the wood and then strap to the bottle with an elastic band, then fill bottle with boiling water and just leave over night, usually works quite well as long as the grain of the wood allows. If you need a bigger or smaller bend you can just use different diameter bottles!
  42. 9 points
    joe100

    SMS Seeadler, 83’ to 1”

    My latest little creation, SMS Seeadler as she appeared early in her career in 1917. The model is made almost exclusively from boxwood and brass. The sails are a fine tissue paper that has been primed and painted, the rigging is several grades of tungsten wire. The sea base was made from carved basswood, then painted and sealed with epoxy resin.
  43. 9 points
    Ahoy, It's been a very busy month but I finally managed to squeeze in a few hours this weekend. I masked the channel line and cut grooves down to take the bulwarks. I glued the bulwarks on too thick on purpose. This allowed me to sand them down thinner to shape and allowed me to try and make the join between the bulwark and the hull flush. I will be running a channel along the join to hide it better anyway. I spent a fair bit of time making some little cannons. The cannon barrels are from bamboo skewers turned down and blacked with a felt tip pen. The wheels are bristles from a dust brush. The bases are from bamboo skewers cut/sanded flat and cut to size. Glued together with PVA. I still need to trim the barrel lengths down, right now they are easier to handle. I store them on the sticky side of some tape. Saves them getting blown away. I also experimented making some hand railing for the forecastle deck, again using brush bristles and bamboo flats. I'm experimenting with hatching. Using blacked bristles here. I laid them up, spread PVA all over, then wiped off the excess and allowed to dry. I'm still not sure if I'll use this method, or try another. I also started glueing the bulwark handrails on. I will cap with a thin strip of bamboo flat on top of the black bristle shown below. I'm thinking of buying some fly tying silk to start experimenting with shrouds and ratlines. How do you folks deal with fly tying silk having a flat profile? Not round? I read somewhere that someone tried splitting the threads. Or is that not required and the flat profile is that that noticeable? Thanks all, I hope to post again soon.
  44. 9 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    And she's done! Completed today. Please bare in mind this is not a copy of any real tea clipper but just 'a ship in the bottle'.
  45. 9 points
    I made more thinner rigging yarns, made new stay ropes, finished the running rigging, added the tiller, the flag on the bowsprit, painted the underwater part with copper and reassembled the whole structure on the slipway
  46. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  47. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    I came back
  48. 9 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    I decided to make a little diorama and have the Asgard sailing around the Baily Light on Howth head on its way into the harbor. I decided I didn't really like the red wire I used to make the gantry and railing, but it was already in the bottle by the time I decided. Oh well...
  49. 9 points
    I just recently responded to a non related question that, bluenose, presented me and realized that I had forgot to mention this oops issue I had in my recent builds discourse. There were so many of these that it's just a blur now. I'm laughing inside right now cause I know we've all been there. Anyway, hopefully the lesson learned here will save some others from heading into the same disastrous conundrum. That issue is, basically, if you are going to build for inside a PINCH bottle, remember there is very little wiggle room inside at the bottle's top. Ordinarily this is never a problem in most bottles, but because the pinch is a pyramid inside your top sails are going to be effected by the narrowness of the glass inside on top. In my scenario as you can see in the picture I had healed my hull too far before the masts were fully erected when I glued the hull in place. Once the epoxy had hardened and I fully erected the masts, my topsails crashed into the glass. POOPS! Needless to say I couldn't have a continuity in my ships trim. I guess most people don't see it but a sailor would for sure. Because I wanted a reaching tack set up on my ship, I should have glued my hull down off center on the bottom, a bitt, in order to have things work out for that point of sail. So basically what I'm saying here, as with any build, MEASURE MEASURE MEASURE your widths especially inside these critters. Thank's, Bruce
  50. 9 points
    First off, I'd like to thank you guys of the forum and most of all Daniel Siemens, for all the wonderful knowledge,help and encouragement I've had the pleasure to receive during the undertaking of this build. My hope with this piece meal presentation is that some other novices out there can benefit fro m my particular experience in some way. So here we go. In almost every way this build incorporates techniques and processes I've never tried before and only became aware of through the pages of this forum and discussions with Daniel. Along the way I had to contrive some methods to get things done, some of which I'll share here. As I was going along I also found myself tearing things down and starting over again and again because I did something that wasn't going to work and had to fix that, testing my patients all the while. After a two month period of time working most every day on it, I came up with a, I think, pretty decent generic brigantine that I basically modeled after this silhouette. I had never built a SIB model with more than one square sail on it before so I've been itching for years now to get to that place where I could confidently build square riggers. For the most part, the majority of the dozen or so SIBs I built years ago were schooners or sloops of one kind or another. MY FIRST CLAY SEA MATERIAL: I decided earl on after looking at some of the seas in pictures on this forum that I was going to use clay for my sea instead of what I had been using which was blue RTV silicone. Here's a picture of what my seas use to look like. I read everything I could find on the forum that addressed sea material, which is quite a lot actually. With some further input from you guys, I finally decided to go with a PLASTALINA type clay made by VAN AKEN. After working with the stuff throughout the course of this adventure I've decided that I love it. I made a really nice sea for my ship. I also found out that it melted easily over my stove burner to fuse well to the bottom and sides of the bottle. An incidental discovery with this material was that if you expose the top surface of this clay once it's in the bottle under the close light of two 100 watt shaded trouble lights, the glass will heat up and after a while the surface of the clay takes on a satin like wet look which I think is SWEET. I can't tell you how long that process took for sure or how hot the glass got. I do know that it became apparent to me that the sea was getting shinny around the time I had been working inside the bottle on the rigging for about a couple of hours. About the 100 watt trouble lights. I like to work with as much light as close as possible to whatever I'm working on. In this scenario I had a light on the right side and a light on the left side about four inches away from the bottle. I'll certainly be utilizing this characteristic that this clay exhibits when heated from above on my next build, too. HOW I MIXED MY SEA COLOR: I made a sampling chart of the five different clay colors that I purchased to come up with the color I chose for this ships sea. I've put all the combinations of clay that I mixed on a stick and numbered them 1 through 11. To this I've attached a print out of the picture of their proportions before mixing for future reference. I'm sure I will want to use a range of sea color possibilities in the future. I know that there are far more combinations I could have mixed but for now these 11 will suffice. SIZING THINGS UP: I've always liked the Pinch bottle 5th and the way a ship looks in it. It's kinda dreamy looking to me and so I chose it for this build. Besides I had one on hand I've been dragging around for eons. LOL. I basically scaled up a drawing of the ship from the silhouette I found on line. I made a hull blank and put it inside the bottle, held that drawing up to the glass to get a good idea of how much of the bottle would fill up with ship. Although I didn't know it at the time that I did my sizing process, Daniel has a much more accurate way to do it in his tutorial on, "How to build a Bermuda sloop (for beginners)", which you can find on this forum under the menu selection called, Build Logs. Check it out! A great deal of what I have come to do on this build of mine is a direct reflection of the things I've learned from his tutorial. Anyway somewhere in the beginning of his tutorial he shows how he makes a paper cutout of the ship and puts that cutout inside the bottle. Wish I knew how to put a link to his tutorial right here but I don't so you'll have to look it up. It's a treasure trove of technique and process for sure. THREAD BLOCKS: Yet another first for me is this thing called a thread block. There's a nice video on Daniel's tutorial by a guy named John Fox III, that shows how to make them. I had never known about them before and how useful they are especially in doing the running rigging for square sails. I made some the way John shows in the video and also came up with another way to put them on the end of my yards which was easier for me. I was also introduced to the Cow Hitch that is used on the center of the yard to attach it to the mast allowing the yard to pivot around. Between these two concepts, it dawned on me how I would be able to rotate the sails out of the way to get them through the neck of the bottle and because the running rigging freely passes through both thread block on the ends of the yard I would be able to set the tack of the sails once everything was inside the bottle.Pretty neat. Basically I made my thread blocks for the yards by holding a piece of wire in my vice. I secured the yard to the wire with a piece of masking tape being mindful of the correct orientation of where the Cow Hitch was and where the blocks needed to be. I made a mark on the wire where I wanted the block located from the end of the yard. That way I could duplicate the same location on the other side. When one thread block was done I slid it off the wire, flipped the yard 180 then put it back on the wire and tied the other one. PAPER SAILS AND SPANKER: Okay for the first time I'm using paper sails too. In the past all my builds had cloth sails because I had always had a problem with kinking paper going down the neck. Fabric was much more compliant for me. Another thing that I gleaned from Daniels, process was that the spanker sail has to come way away from the mast in order to get through the neck and unscathed. In my case I made a yolk crutch to wrap around the mast for the end of the boom out of a piece of brass wire. I drilled a hole through the mast at the spot where the boom would be nesting. Then I made two wire blocks and tied them to the boom.The running rigging for the spanker sail's sheeting goes through them and the hole then forward all the way out of the bottle.This configuration worked out perfectly for me as the gaff was able to move way out of the way along with the boom when the time came. So no kinked spanker. Incidentally, the travelers you see in my pictures are "Mini Swing Line Stapler", staples. I've used them on almost every ship I've made for that purpose. Sometimes I put a radius on them. On this build I also used four of them to attach my rat lines and back stays onto. Ironically, using the staples this way would later save my ass , as you will shortly come to see. LESSON LEARNED These pictures show a couple of things. The first thing that is evident, (to you old salts anyway), is that my ratlines and back stays are too far forward of the center line of the mast to ever lay down flat. When the time came to fold down the masts and I discovered that they wouldn't lay down I almost had a heart attack. Disaster! At one time I must have known about the importance of these elements locations relative to the pivot point of the mast because all my builds were successful in the past in this regard. But over the years I just totally forgot about it. Anyway, after a while of total dismay and a whiny conversation with Daniel, it came to me that I could remove the staples that the ratlines and back stays were attached to and relocate them back and up. That solved the problem and is an example of one of the tear downs I was speaking about in the beginning of this discourse. I wasn't able to get those lines as tight as they were and that's a huge disappointment. Another thing that the pictures show is the way I chose to step the masts. In the past I always used the wire hing method but this time I decided to use clock bearings. These bearings are put in old clocks when the original bearings are worn oval over time. It just so happens that I also restore antique clocks for a hobby too and have these bearings on hand.The one side of the bearing has a counter sink on it to hold oil for a gears pinion shaft. that counter sink was mounted up so the mast with a rounded bottom nested in the countersink just fine. In the future I'm just going to drill a divot on my deck to do this . it's a lot less work. SECURING THE SHIP IN THE BOTTLE: I put a trough in the middle of my sea material and found some of that white 5 minute epoxy at Home depot that Daniel had spoken about somewhere on the forum. Can't remember where but anyway it worked out great. There was a little bit of it that oozed up around the hull but I covered that up with white clay to look like the wake of a ship moving through the water. SETTING MY SAILS TACK INSIDE THE BOTTLE: I'm sure that there is some way to avoid what I had to do to come to the point of sail I wanted for my ship but as yet I don't know that. Basically I made my sea to reflect a reaching tack which meant that everything had to be adjusted from how it was built outside the bottle for that tack inside the bottle. For the boom and gaff of the spanker sail I used a piece of wood to lean against the top end of the gaff which held it there while the CA glue dried. I pushed the boom out with a wire tool and tightened the sheeting of the sail from outside the bottle. At this point I glued the yolk and sheeting line off with CA. Then I went in with a razor on a wire and cut the sheeting line off at the front of the mast where it came out of the hole. ADJUSTING THE YARDS: To pull the yards over for the reach tack I made a slip knot lasso and used that to grab the outside end of the yard arm and pull it forward careful all the while that the running rigging was moving through the thread blocks on either side of the yard arm without hanging up. Worked like a charm. I then went in and touched the Cow Hitch at the mast with some CA glue to set it. I waited a minute before I let go of the tension on the lasso I was using to hold the yards position.To be doubly sure the sail would stay put I removed the lasso and touched the outside thread block where the running rigging touched it with the CA glue. The only problem with this process aside from being tedious is that it is difficult to get all the yards on both masts to have the same degree of angle when it's all said and done. There's got to be a better way to do this, I mean to have the tack of all the sails predetermined before it goes in the bottle? Perhaps some of you guys can pipe in on this issue? One other thing that I learned about CA glue is it will for sure fog up the inside of your bottle if you use a lot of glue like I did inside. So best, if you can turn the bottle up to let the off gasses from the glue escape better. Even so be prepared to spend hours inside with Windex and a piece of cloth scrubbing the glass clean again. Big Pain In The Ass. Better yet plan the build to use a minimal amount of glue inside. SUMMING UP: There are a whole lot of more topics I could have touched on in this discourse but If I go on about it, it's kinda like someone saying , I could write a book. So I'm leaving it here. I sure learned a great deal during this build doing things for the first time was daunting in some respects but I survived the fray. I'd also like to say that it sure is nice to have a place like this to share our projects with other like minded nut cases because let's face it no average person on the planet has a clue about the work we do creating these little engineering marvels. There is so much to learn in this wonderful medium and I'm excited about the future builds I'm dreaming of already. Great to have my feet wet again. Thanks for reading mate. Best regards Bruce.
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