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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/16/2020 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi all. Deck planking is done! More to come. Cheers Mick
  2. 6 points
    John Fox III

    Making gratings using card stock

    Greetings, Been experimenting with making gratings for my 1:96 scale sandbagger model. Photos sort of explain everything. Started out with some fairly stiff, .010" thick brownish orange card stock. Used red mahogany wiping stain and a kleenex tissue to darken the card stock. The card was then cut into strips 3" long and just under 1/32" wide. I made a jig out of aluminum, gleaned from the spouts of cardboard salt containers, designed to hold the strips about 1/32" apart. Strips were then slid into the jig and extended about 1/4", then another strip was slid under them at 90 degrees from their orientation. I used a metal engineer scale placed over the strips to hold them tightly on top of the cross strip. A small wire was used to apply cyanoacrylic glue to each side of the cross strips to hold it all together. I then cut the jig strips carefully off on each side of the strip that was left. Another strip was then glued on top of the "nubs" by hand, then pairs of strips were glued together. Five of these double assemblies were then glued together to make a single grid piece. For my model it took six of these pieces to complete the grating. The grating pieces were then sanded carefully down as thin as I could sand them without breaking them apart. I used a small block with two 1/32" thick pieces of maple veneer glued near each end to hold the grating pieces against a piece of 320 grit sandpaper and moved them back and forth to get to the thickness I wanted. Final photos show the grating in place on two models. More explanation on the hulls of my sandbagger models in another posting later. The whole process was fiddly and time consuming, but worth it for me anyway. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  3. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    Decided to try my hand at a miniature sib, oh what have I let myself in for! It's definatley fun but very fiddly. Starting to realise the fact that I also need some miniature tools as well! ๐Ÿ˜‚
  4. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    So the crew decided that the shrouds looked a bit bare and insisted that I install the ratlines after all, so after a lot of faffing about (and a bit of blue language) I decided to have a go. They are tediously small so I come up with a plan that seems to be working really well! So far, hopefully ๐Ÿ˜‚
  5. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    I had a word with the crew and they said no to ratlines. phew! ๐Ÿ˜‚
  6. 4 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    So that was very fiddly, but turned out not too bad, all lines now cut and free of the jig. ๐Ÿ˜
  7. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    Well after some input from you guys and also after thinking about the huge engineering issues I have to confront building a viking ship with oars in the water and with a sail up, I've decided to go for it. I just started with it today. I may very well fry and burn on this one but it will be here for all to see, good bad or ugly. I've decided to model my ship after a picture I found on Google. I'm not sure if it's a painting or an actual ship that once existed, but I like it's lines and I think I can pull it off. I did a tracing of that picture and am using it as well as other ship plans I've also gleaned off the internet to build this replica of what I am assuming is a raiding vessel. An interesting note to consider about Viking ships is that they build many kinds, all of different beams and lengths. They even build ships for moving live stock across the oceans. Here are some pictures of how I've started this build.
  8. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    As you can see I'm using a tong depressor for the keel and dragons tail /head, rough cutting it out with my hobby jig saw. Obviously I'm going to have to put the dragons head on after the ship is in the bottle so I have separated it from the main keel lines construct. Hopefully this will turn out okay. I like the lines on this drawing and the fact that there aren't so may oars is a plus for me . After all I just want to get the idea across in a bottle. More to come as I go along.
  9. 4 points
    exwafoo

    Viking ship with oars?

    Bluenoser, 1/72 scale, ie 1 inch to 6 feet. The SIB will be about 6 inches long, a small Drakar, or 'Dragon Ship'. The figures are as shown. An internet search will show suppliers. I decided to buy them as I'm not confident of carving any. The planned bottle is a 2ยฝ litre cider bottle that gives enough height for the mast. Regards Alan PS: Oars, shields, and sea chests (used for sitting on) are also in the box. The figures comprise rowers, a helmsman, and others in various poses for working ship.
  10. 4 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Thanks for the compliment Bruce. Ships from this era hold a certain amount of fascination for me ; the combination of sail and steam is enough for me to get suitably enthusiastic about a project and if it's a historic ship, then it's an added bonus.
  11. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    CSS Alabama

    Onni: Your prowess in this creation just blows my mind. It will certainly turn out to be another wonderful example of your skills in replication of a famous ship.. Thanks for showing all the steps you are engaging in to make it. I'm especially fascinated with your use of the plastic sheeting. Can't wait for your next installment. regards Bruce.
  12. 4 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Time to do some painting. Looks a whole lot better with a lick of paint๐Ÿ˜‰
  13. 3 points
    DSiemens

    1st miniature sib

    I saw in another post someone had trouble with the synthetic paint brush bristles. I use ones that are made from hair. Probably horse hair. They already have a tan sort of color. experiment with different ones and see what happens.
  14. 3 points
    Jeff B

    Viking ship with oars?

    Side view. Once in the bottle, can set the joint straight with adhesive.
  15. 3 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    The workbench,aka,the kitchen table!
  16. 3 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Oop's,sometimes bad things happen. It's repairable though.
  17. 2 points
    James w rogers

    Viking ship with oars?

    How about copper wire for the oars, cut to length and tap the ends flat with a hammer, filed round on the ends and painted. You'd have to fit them one at a time though, but they should stand up to the abuse of pushing the ends down into the sea. ๐Ÿ˜
  18. 2 points
    James w rogers

    Viking Ship

    That's looking really great! I love viking boats. ๐Ÿ˜Ž
  19. 2 points
    John: You continue to amaze me with you inventive techniques! This is a stellar representation of grates. Thanks so much for sharing this process with us. I'm sure I'll apply it on one of my builds in the future. It's just so clean and neat!. Regards Bruce
  20. 2 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    1st miniature sib

    James : Wow ! That's quite the neat set up for doing your rat lines! Should be no problem. Regards Bruce
  21. 2 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    Exwafoo: Alan: Yes I'd like to see what your plans look like. If you want you can email them to me at gbrucefoxworthy@gmail.com I've found these plans on the internet but it's a little too much for me. I think I will replicate the picture here That I assume is a model by who knows who. The reason I like this representation is because there is not so many oars or shields. I think it was a raiding vessel. Anyway I've been watching a lot of U tube videos and getting a feel for these ships dynamics in general. Fascinating stuff. I love U tube! So far I've found out that they made a number of ships with different widths and lengths all without any plans at all which is a testament to their skills. They even made some specifically for transporting live stock. Go figure. Thanks for all your input. It's much appreciated. Regards Bruce
  22. 2 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    Exwafoo: I had no idea that you could buy little men like this! In the past I've always made my sailors out of wire and then dipped them or painted the wire with acrylic paint to flesh them out. Here's a picture of one that's kinda beat up cause I reclaimed him from a snafu build from years ago. They can actually turn out pretty sweet. Normally I painted them like they were wearing fowl weather gear but the Vikings would have to be painted differently. This guy is about 3/8 of an inch tall.
  23. 2 points
    Jeff B

    Viking ship with oars?

    For Bruce. Opposite of prior description. Wood with rubber band flexi joint.
  24. 2 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Managed to get quite a lot done on her this weekend.Cut out gun port doors from 0,3 plastic and glued them in place. That was a bit tedious! The stern was a problem;tried to form it in thin plastic but it was hopless (or maybe I'm useless)so I cut out a stern chunk from a thicker plastic and moulded it with thin stern bulwark and underneath with modelling clay.It dosen't look so great but when I've sanded it off and painted it, I hope it will look better. So now the stern slots in place. Worked on the masts and bowsprit just to get them the right lengths for the bottle. Tried a 3mm diameter brass tube for the funnel but it just didn't look right so I went with a 4mm wooden dowel which I will drill out an opening on the top later.
  25. 1 point
    Thanks Bernard, I do try! <Grin> Outside of working on my musical endeavors, I have lots of time to experiment with new techniques and methods, always trying to improve on every aspect of my modeling efforts. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  26. 1 point
    Hi John Your usual standards of innovation, technique and manual dexterity. Very nice indeed.
  27. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    My son wants me to build a viking ship with sail and oars. He is half Norwegian and very Viking like in his demeanor as well. Anyway I can't find a build on the forums log here that shows anyone of our members has made one in this kind of configuration. So any suggestion or plans? Just fishing here.?? Thanks Bruce.
  28. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Viking ship with oars?

    You could always position them so they are just about to enter or leave the sea., and 'foam' the sea to suit. Would save any worry about pushing into the sea medium. Alan
  29. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    James: I'm defiantly going to use wire for the oars. I have quite a selection of piano wires in different diameters that I use frequently for replacing the trunnions in the lantern gears on antique clocks when I restore them. And yes I'll peen the ends flat and shape them. On this ship there will be 14 oars. So a bit of time is going to go into making them. I'm afraid copper wire would be to soft. If just one gets bent it will look like hell. After I make them, I'll soak them in Muriatic acid which should give them a rust color. Thanks for the suggestion anyway. Regards Bruce
  30. 1 point
    bluenoser

    Viking ship with oars?

    Thanks Alan
  31. 1 point
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    Yes I see that, I tried a couple of synthetic ones as an experiment, and find they also kink when bending too much and dont straighten back out! Will definatley try some hair ones another time as I've already made the yards out of thinned down cocktail sticks. I'm also going to try some broom bristles as they are also a good size. ๐Ÿ˜
  32. 1 point
    Jeff B

    Viking ship with oars?

    Idea for oars...elastic. Rubber band .harden with paint, cut out an oar, glue a flat tooth pick on the "backside. Cut or break the toothpick right where it goes in to the side of the ship. Rubber bands are quite versatile.
  33. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    Thanks D. I like the thought of trying out the brush bristle idea. I'm thinking of making the round shields and the oars along with that section of the bulwarks all one unit some how hinging the oars and then pinning the bulwarks into the hull. If that makes sense to you. Some experimenting for sure. Regards B.
  34. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Viking ship with oars?

    I was going to see if anyone would reply to this first. I've never done it but I've seen it done. I want to say David Lavoie has done it. I haven't seen him on this site in a while but he frequents the Facebook group. Seems like theres a couple ways to do it. If you can get them to hinge on the ship you can attach the oars and put the whole ship in at once. Perhaps glue a piece of thread to the end of each oar and then glue the other end of the thread to the hull. Then on the other end of the oars glue a continuous thread that connects each oar. Tightening that thread will get all the oars to their equal spacing. Adjust as needed and cover that end with clay or paint to blend it into the sea. Another method would be insert each oar one by one along the ship. It's tedious but it would work. Or mix the two and have a thread on both ends of the oar like a rope ladder. Insert the oars separately and glue one side to the hull and put the other in the sea. This risks having the thread show on the side of the hull though. Or use a flexible material. Glue paintbrush bristles in as the oars and bend them even with the hull as they go in once in they'll popback out into place. They may bend a little but if they aren't bent to far and if anchored in the sea material I think you could get them to straiten back out. It's work testing. Let us know what you end up doing. I don't think a method for this has been recorded on this site yet.
  35. 1 point
    DSiemens

    1st miniature sib

    James - Something you could try is paint brush bristles for the yard arms. Glue a couple together if you want to make some thicker than others. They are flexible so they allow a little give going into the bottle and gets you closer to scale. Looking good so far.
  36. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    CSS Alabama

    By the way our kitchen table is preoccupied with jigsaw puzzles 24/7. LOL.
  37. 1 point
    MickyK

    1st miniature sib

    This should be fun!! Personally, I have my limits! But I'll keep watching. Mick
  38. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    1st miniature sib

    Fiddly for sure. You like hurting yourself don't you James. LOL. But you're off to a great start. Can't wait to watch your progress. Steady as she goes. Regards Bruce
  39. 1 point
    Lubber123

    Kit Review - AM "Privateer"

    Hi Rudi, the instructions are rather rudimentary but if I can find a few minutes I'll copy mine and send them too your email. I just got back to this build. Since it isn't ment to be a "museum quality" exact build I feel free to take liberties with the instructions. One confusion is the way they recommend how to drill the holes in the mast for the yardarms so they properly kant. I don't think this is necessary and is unduly complicated. The yards usually have enough play so that they can be adjusted in the bottle but one needs to add the yard arm riggings which are missing in the directions. So a bit a "mashing" might be appropriate.
  40. 1 point
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Thanks tazam, It was the only way I could figure out how to make them robust, and also follow the sheer- line of the ship! Mick
  41. 1 point
    tazam0827

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    I like the way your chain plates are an extension of one of the thin laminated layers of the hull. Looks nice and sturdy!
  42. 1 point
    Amazing detail! And a superb planking job, looks very realistic, very nice. ๐Ÿ˜
  43. 1 point
    Greetings, I have been experimenting with various construction items for a 1:96 scale model of a sandbagger yacht for the past year or so. The model is nearly finished, but because I was experimenting I hadn't photographed any of the work as it progressed. I've been asked to make a presentation at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum this coming May, so have been repeating some of the work that turned out well. Thought I would share it with our members. The first items I am describing are the blocks for the model. First photo shows the steps used to make single and two kinds of double blocks. I started out with strips of .01" thick brass sheet, cut into strips 1/32" wide, length is determined by the block type being made. I drilled two holes with a #80 drill bit, for single blocks the holes were 3-1/2 to 4 32nd inches apart. The strips were then cut off near the holes on each end, the ends were rounded and the width thinned down in the center portion of the strip. The strip was then bent around a #77 drill bit at the center of the strip. I used some 1/32" diameter electrical wire insulation for the sheaves of the block, obtained by taking apart a cheap set of ear buds. The wire was removed from the insulation, and the center drilled out with the #80 drill bit. The insulation was then cut into 1/64" long pieces. The sheaves were placed in the gap of the brass piece, and a length of 38 gauge brass wire was cut and glued through the holes in the brass and through the sheave, a dab of cyanoacrylate glue was then applied to the wire ends to lock the block together. The double blocks were of two types, difference being side by side sheaves or one above the other sheave setups. For the side by side sheaves I simply drilled the holes in the brass strip 5/32" apart, I also cut and sanded a 1/32" circle from the brass strip with a #80 drilled hole in the center. Two sheaves were used, and all assembled similar to the single block, with the brass circle between the sheaves. The second type of double block was made by drilling the same sized holes near one end of the brass strip 2/32" apart, then drilled the second set of holes the same distance apart as the single block. Two wires were used to hold the two sheaves to the block one above the other. The other photos show the blocks as added to the model. Some one above the other blocks were longer, and some single blocks were longer so that a rigging line could be added to the block end. This was done by drilling the same sized hole 1/16" from the outside block hole on each end of the strip. The blocks were assembled as the others above, with just a piece of wire glued into the last holes. Most of the blocks were installed by making wire hoops from the 38 gauge wire, wrapping it around a drill bit of the appropriate size, then cutting rings from the wire. Others were installed by drawing down the wire to a smaller diameter, centering a piece of thinned with in the opening at the center of the finished block, then using a tweezers to twist the wire twice, then wrapping the wire ends around the spar. The name of my model sandbagger is Whistle Blower II. So named as it is a model of a modern built sandbagger named Tattler II. It's an interesting vessel as it is a remake of an older sandbagger, Tattler, that won many races on Lake Geneva in Wisconsin. The modern remake though was designed especially designed to be easier to sail, so there are some very interesting rigging that was used. Unfortunately, when I contacted the yachts builder I was informed that due to contractural requirements with the owner, they were not allowed to share any information with me about it's construction or rigging. So, my model was built from plans I developed from just 12 photographs I found online, some of them taken during early shakedown cruises before the yacht was painted and rigging finished. Hope you find some of this useful. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  44. 1 point
    Nice work John. You never cease to amaze me.
  45. 1 point
    Very nice work John. Thanks for sharing.
  46. 1 point
    Onni

    Blocks for a larger sized model ship/boat

    Very intricate work. Looks great!
  47. 1 point
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Not that happy with the joining of the hull in the middle so I cut away the bottom section,cleaned off all the old glue and replaced with a new piece of styreene. The aft of the ship looks terrible but I will attempt to redress that later on by some sort of method! Before anyone points out that the'Alabama' only had a two bladed screw and not a four bladed one like I made; I have already fixed that issue with a stanley knife๐Ÿ˜‚
  48. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    HMS Ramillies

    Lovely model Joe. Looks really authentic. I once made a model of HMS Belfast in her dazzle paint. It was a kit and I found the result very satisfying, especially the dazzle effect.
  49. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS Ramillies

    Very nice model. Camouflage colours are always going to pose a problem. My late father served on an 'F' class Destroyer during the Second world war but couldn't really remember the camouflage colours she had in the build up to D-Day after the Western Approaches (blue and white)were painted over .
  50. 1 point
    joe100

    HMS Ramillies

    After 36 days of work, 672 individual scratch-built pieces, my 1/1500 scale model of the British super-dreadnought HMS Ramillies is finished. The model depicts the ship as she appeared working up in late 1917 with her Wilkinson Admiralty Disruptive Dazzle camouflage scheme. The model is made from boxwood and brass, with four grades of tungsten wire for the rigging. The sea base was made from carved basswood and painted. The ship was built entirely from scratch using scale drawings and photographs. If youโ€™d like more information about how I build these ships, I have a website www.josephlavender.com. None of the models are for sale and I do not take commissions. The 1943 Shilling is just under 1โ€ or 24mm in diameter for scale. HMS Ramillies was a difficult subject since sheโ€™s probably the least-documented of the five Revenge class battleships. Only a handful of photographs exist of her from late 1917, the period I chose for the model. However, the originally Admiralty color plates used to paint the dazzle camouflage still exist. Ramillies wore this camouflage from late 1917 through March 1918. The colors did pose a bit of a challenge since the forward section of the ship was essentially painted pink or mauve as the RN referred to it, and that color doesnโ€™t scale well. I chose a pinkish peach color cut with a bit of medium grey. Had I used the color right from the plate, without scaling it, I think it would have appeared too garish. The same was done with the other colors as well, cutting them with grey to soften them a bit.
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