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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    My second acquired SIB – Robin Hood’s Bay in an Aspirin Bottle Here I present the second SIB that came into my life. In the 1960’s a local department store had a line of SIBs available that were made in Robin Hood’s Bay, England. One day as a child I had the privilege of watching a demonstration in the store where a fellow from England was inserting a model into a bottle and erecting its masts by the magical “pulling on strings”. This modest example appeared under the Christmas tree that year for me to enjoy. The end cap has a label which is missing a piece which gives the exact origin as “ [Ship?] Models, Robin Hood’s Bay, England”. The model is a statement of elegant simplicity. The bottle is of the type that aspirin commonly came in back then and measures 3 7/8” x 2”x 1”. The ship is a full square rigged three masted clipper with sails made from paper. The hull is simple and it is simply rigged with a shroud for each mast and one stay connecting the mast to the bowsprit which acted as the “magic string”. Notably the masts are not hinged to the deck and may have been pushed into place into little groves in the deck and then glued down after they were raised. Its little pendants are flying straight ahead showing the direction of the wind into its tiny sails. It’s a neat little keepsake and I’ve had it for over 50 years.
  2. 8 points
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Greetings All, I now have the fore mast added to the ship in light bulb model of James Miller. All the fore stays, shrouds and backstays have been added, as well as all the headsails and all their rigging. The two jib sails are static, They do not move with the stays they are attached to, they are attached by small open loops so that the stay can move through the sail, since the stays for those sails runs through the jib and martingale spike, then into the hull and is the operating end of these lines. The fore sail does move with the stays, as in this case they are double, one on each side of the bowsprit, running through the bees and back into the hull, these are also the operating ends of the stays.I learned a lesson with the foremast, in that I added all the running rigging before adding the shrouds and ratlines, which was a mistake as it made adding the shrouds much more difficult with all the running rigging lines being so light in color they kept getting accidentally tied into the shrouds. The cabin and hatch are also permanently attached now. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  3. 6 points
    James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Almost ready to bottle.
  4. 5 points
    James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Bottle painted and acrylic decorators caulking pumped in with a skeleton gun. i put a length of stiff clear plastic tube on end of the nozzle which allows me to direct the flow straight onto the bottom of the bottle, then whilst still wet I push it down with a slightly wet metal spatula and smear it around a bit to get desired effect. Once it has skinned over I will paint another coat of acrylic paint over the surface to replicate the surface of the sea before setting the hull into it while it is still soft. That’s the plan for now anyway!🤔
  5. 5 points
    exwafoo

    Robin Hood's Bay in an Aspirin Bottle

    Hi There, I thought it may have been an early SIB by Leon Labistour who with his wife lived in Robin Hood's Bay and produced many quality SIBS. Leon passed some time ago, however I know his wife through the European Association of Ships in Bottles. I've contacted her and this is the information Pat replied with. "Hi Alan. No, it's one from the factory in the next village, Fylingthorpe. They made millions of aspirin bottle models, all farmed out to piece workers. They advertised as RHB because nobody had heard of Fylingthorpe. The factory was called Ship Models and was run by a guy called Milsom.Glad the owner of the model likes it!cheers, Pat." Hope this helps you out. Best Alan
  6. 2 points
    Wow, Thanks for this information, it's more than I could ever had hoped for! I do remember an Englishman giving the demonstration and there were Iarger, more expensive models for sale but I was glad to just get this.
  7. 2 points
    Its a charming little sub, with a great story and has lasted the test of time. Thank you for sharing it.
  8. 2 points
    JesseLee

    La nina, caravel.

    Beautiful!
  9. 1 point
    Thanks, I found the article and found it very informative. I can tell what model isn't but I can't determine what it is. It's definitely early to mid 20th century because of the screw cap bottle but beyond that it's just conjecture. Maybe more than one hand was involved? The hull is almost too perfect, the holes are neatly reamed and the shrouds are finely knotted, the spars are neatly wired to the mast and the background is imaginative but the deck is coarsely hewn, the hull is crudely painted and the main stays, mast and spars are unformed and rough. I guess I'll never know.
  10. 1 point
    There's an article in the Bottled Ship Wright Journal (see under 'Clubs' above) on this subject that may help you out a bit. Alan
  11. 1 point
    Thanks for the info...I agree that its origin will probably long remain a mystery but to me it's a priceless treasure. I have not received any emails aside from a general form letter confirming my enrollment...hope to post more, I'm in the process of my first SIB build in forty years. Not much for logging builds though, that has to at least double the build time!
  12. 1 point
    The only kits I know of from the 1950s were built by a company called ship yard and it had a plastic bottle that came in two pieces and had yo be glued together with the ship in the middle. Unless there are other kits I don't know, which is likely, I don't think this is a kit. I don't know that I can add much more to the bottle information than you have already contributed. The rounded markings on the base suggest an Owens machine made bottle to me. At earliest it would be 1910 but Owens machines were used into the 1980's which means it could be any where in between. I found an article stating a lot of glass makers in Baltimore used an anchor mark in different variations so its possible it could be from there. It is hard to say. As far as the ship goes the rigging looks accurate as in proper placement of back stays and lifts. Who ever built it knew ships or at the very least had good sources. It is built in an early style in that it doesn't have sails and it depicts a scene. That is typical of sibs I've seen from the 1915ish to the 1920's. Could be its built by an old salt or some one learning from one. It is a rough build. I suspect it could have been one of the builders first models. Might be why it got left behind in the house. Maybe they thought it wasn't as good as later builds but didn't have the heart to throw it away so leave it as treasure. It really is hard to say. Its a fun little ship in bottle though and the story behind it is interesting. Thank you for sharing it.
  13. 1 point
    CharlieB

    Our first Bottled Shipwright Journal

    Just read the first issue/ Congratulations on a job well done.
  14. 1 point
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Thanks Igor! I do try! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  15. 1 point
    IgorSky

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Amazing work, John! My congrats!
  16. 1 point
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Thanks Bernard! It was definitely very boring, took about four to five hours to make the chain, about six inches, for each model. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  17. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Very nicely done John. The chain looks really good. It must have been very time consuming. Bernard
  18. 1 point
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Greetings All, Today I share the latest work on the James Miller models. I have completed adding the bobstays, jib boom shrouds and jib boom backstays to both models. The bobstays and shrouds are made from miniature rope, made on a mini rope walk I built a year or so ago, using 3 pieces of 8/0 fly tying thread. The backstays are fake miniature chain, made from 8/0 fly tying thread tied around a #80 drill bit with double overhand knots. To keep the "chain" fairly straight I tied a second piece of thread to the first loop tied, after removing the drill bit from the hole in an 9" long piece of wood, then passing this second thread through a rubber band tightly wrapped around the far end of the wood. Before each new double knot was added, the second line was pulled slightly, so that as the first knot was tied to the next knot it would pull the second line, keeping the knots tied opposite each other to keep the chain straight. As each double knot was tied, the bit was removed from the hole in the wood, and the whole thing repeated endlessly. Second photo shows the completed forecastle area, with everything permanently in place. I also wanted to share that I found some really nice, super fine, fly tying thread. It is labeled and sold as 20 DEN line, and is finer than a human hair. I've used 8/0, 10/0 and 12/0 threads, but they are nearly identical in overall size, but this 20 DEN stuff is a lot smaller/thinner. According to the info at the J. Stockard fly tying company online this line is equivalent to 19/0 thread. It is quite a bit weaker than the other threads mentioned, but works great for wrapping. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
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