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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/02/2020 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    exwafoo

    West Country Trading Ketch Bessie.

    West Country Trading Ketch Bessie Way back in 2016,when the world was normalish, the Royal Yacht Club asked the European Association of ships in Bottles to help fund raise for the UK Olympic Sailing Team by building and donating SIBs that had had the sail signed by a team member. I built two SIBs of this ship, see Build Log called ‘Going for Gold Build – Bessie’, so I won’t repeat that part of the build. I actually built 3 SIBs, using the third as a trial ship for some techniques, such as split hull, that I had not used before. Up until last year it sat on a shelf unfinished. I then thought I’d carry on with trial methods in the form of small blocks and dead eyes to see how I got on. I made the blocks from a strip of hardwood veneer. It was a mixed packet of off the net so I’m uncertain what it actually was. The strip was 0.75 mm thick, 1 mm wide and about 10 cm long to give something to grip. I drilled 0.5 mm holes along the length at 1 mm intervals, then applied a diluted acrylic varnish to strengthen the wood strip. After clearing the holes, I filed notches all round as shown in Figure 1, then cut the blocks off. I held them in a pair of tweezers that have a sliding lock, Figure 2, to lightly sand the corners. The tweezers were then held upright in a small vice and the block stropped with thin buff thread with a touch of glue on the thread and knot. Figure 1 Figure 2 I then set about the running rigging as shown in Figures 3 & 4. I know that these blocks are a touch too big for the scale, but it was a proof of concept. I’m happy enough with the result. To form the dead eyes, I tried a method I saw on a page on the net somewhere a number of years ago. A small jig is made, Figure 5 left hand side. I used 0.5 mm brass rod in a bit of wood. Wire is wraped around the posts as shown. The wire is then removed, the shroud threaded through it, positioned and glued in place. The centre of the wire circles is filled in with glue mixed with black paint. I actually used thread on the jig as I did not have any wire of the correct size, and stiffened it with dilute PVA glue, removing the assembly before the glue cured completely. Figure 4 shows a close up of the dead eyes installed. Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 shows the completed SIB before bottling. Figure 6 Then, CRACK, the mainmast broke in the bottleneck, Figures 7 & 8. Not a happy camper. Figure 7 Figure 8 It took a while, but I fixed it by turning the break into a hinge using a thin piece of brass so it would not break again. Circled in red in Figure 9. The brass rod sticking out to the right is my mast holder tool. Figure 9 Figure 10 shows it nicely bottled and dust free. Figure 10
  2. 6 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Started this build way back in April but have only just completed it because Covid-19 lockdown and other things got in the way. My Dad served in her from 1942-21.6.1944 as a Telegraphist. He used to joke that the first time he went to France he had to swim ashore! Fury was mined off the Normandy coast 21st June 44 and lost all power to the ship so that she collided with a number of other ships when the tow ropes broke. Anyway I've try to build her how she looked off the coast of Iceland in 1942 wearing Western Approaches camouflage.
  3. 6 points
    One reason I've been hesitant to build scale ship models in the past is that I know that they really should be displayed in a case least they get full of dust or become the victims of unfortunate collisions. For the first model that I ever built, I purchased a somewhat expensive oak fame kit that I finished myself and had glass cut for it at a glazier. This case is a thing of beauty and I was so happy with how my model turned out that I didn't mind the expense of the case kit. Well my "Harvey" model is a bit of a different situation. Although I am happy with how it came out and I put a significant amount of work into it, it isn't quite a "museum piece" - after all the ship model kit only cost me $15.00 (USD). So, I decided to try to make my own case for it. I am not a skilled woodworker and I don't have very sophisticated power tools aside from a power saw and drill. But I have spent a significant amount of time thinking about how I would build one and I had my professionally built kit to guide me as an example. I also didn't have ready access to high quality furniture grade wood to use for the frame so I decided to try some "home improvement" store 3/4 inch square "hardwood" dowel - which I think is either birch or poplar - not the hardest of woods. I also had to make a somewhat dangerous jig to convert my power saw into a table saw to cut slots in the wood - I still have all my fingers but for legal reasons I won't disclose details of this jig. So here's my final post about the "Harvey" - all set to sail in it's glass case. The case is 17"L x 14.5" H x 8"D (outside dimensions).
  4. 5 points
    IgorSky

    What's on your workbench?

    Hello, everybody! I was away for a while, but my work was progressing... Best Regards! Igor.
  5. 5 points
    James w rogers

    San paolo 1743 xambekk malta.

    Coming along.
  6. 5 points
    Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Well it's time to resurrect this project and get it done! It has been over 2 years. I will start to post soon. The Preussen is going to be a bit of a stinker as there is a ton of rigging involved. There is going to be some head scratching for sure. Stay tuned! Chass 😵
  7. 5 points
    DSiemens

    Spanish Armada Film

    There's a whole list of ships in the UK I'd love to go see. The Golden Hind, Cutty Sark, Victory, Mary Rose. I'll have to make a trip some day. There's a ship from that time period I've thought of building and maybe I aught to get on it. It was called the Desire and captained by Thomas Cavendish. My 13th great grandfather Thomas Eldred sailed on it with Cavendish. I guess they were good friends. A Painting of Eldred and of the Desire is in the Christchurch Mansion. Would be fun to visit the mansion too.
  8. 4 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Went out and bought some light blue felt just to finish off the inside of the old whiskey box and added/glued the ship's badge onto the side...and she's done. Pity Dad's not around to see it ,think he would of loved her.
  9. 4 points
    Onni

    Spanish Armada Film

    Nice set of photos. They give an insight into how small these ships actually were and how amazing the voyages they undertook were. Could of done with these photos when I built my version in 2013.
  10. 4 points
    exwafoo

    Spanish Armada Film

    Some phots of the Golden Hinde replica in London.
  11. 4 points
    So she finally left the dockyard and hit the bottle/light bulb! Chass ⚔️
  12. 3 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    I cheat! Well not really, I purchase photo etched railings from a Polish company called GPM (they produce mainly card models) but they also sell photo etched railings and other items. Of course I paint the railings first and then super glue them in place. Nice railings make a model stand out I think. If I tried to make them myself it would be a horrible mess I used 1:400 railings. The one's in the picture are 1:250.
  13. 3 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Thanks Bernard. She was a 'F' class destroyer launched in September 1934.Dad told me that she could still do 35 knots on a good day. Her main claim to fame was transporting Edward VIII after his abdication, to France in the very early hours of the next morning.
  14. 3 points
    John Fox III

    HMS FURY 1942

    Amazing amount of fine detailing, excellent job portraying the ship! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  15. 3 points
    exwafoo

    Spanish Armada Film

    Oni, Its not one of the well known ships. Cutty Sark gets most of the publicity in London. It has a website and there are a lot more phots on line. I remember seeing a recent photo that shows the dock has been drained (the water was disgusting) and scaffolding erected around the ship, so I think some maintenance is being undertaken. Its worth a visit if you get a chance. Al
  16. 2 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Forgot to say she was a 'veteran' of Dunkirk, PQ17, Operation Pedestal (to supply Malta) and of course D-Day.
  17. 2 points
    exwafoo

    Spanish Armada Film

    Dan, If you do decide to make the trip, try to make it when the EASIB convention is being held. Two birds with one stone. Alan
  18. 2 points
  19. 2 points
    Lovely! Well done! Mick
  20. 2 points
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Okay, it's HMS Captain which sunk in the Bay of Biscay in 1870. A Victorian navy turret ship which had a dangerously low freeboard. She goes together well with my other model;HMS Inflexible.
  21. 2 points
    Working without plans or proper procedures is a bit of a chore. I had to manufacture some of my own parts like dead-eyes, braces and mast hoops. I rigged the yardarms onto hoops so that they are adjustable instead of gluing them directly to the masts as I think was the intention - which would have been hard since I don't have plans that tell me where they should be glued. So I'm either making things up as I go along or researching other models to figure out what things should look like. I've used parts left over from some other kits I've built and I borrowed the mast, gaff and boom rigging scheme, so now the model is part 18th Century Long Boat, part 19th Century Baltimore Clipper and part 20th Century fishing schooner - a real "Frankenboat". Actually I now refer to it as my "Plague Ship". The photos don't do justice to the amount of work I put into it. I had to stop at this point after my hand cramped up while trying to belay the lower yardarm. I can't figure out if this yardarm is suppose to have a sail on it or was it just a brace? I have no sail plan for it but found sail plans for all the rest. I also took the liberty of making a boom for the main foresail since I can't believe that it wouldn't have had one but none was included in the plans. I rigged the peaking, up lift and throat halyards as if it were a fishing schooner. The model looks a little sparse without the jib sails but I think I'll leave them until after I make the mainsail, main top sail and jumbo. This way if I run low on sail cloth I can just show them furled. It sure is a lot of work for a model that isn't going to win any prizes for accuracy. If the way to make a first rate model is to not be afraid to tear out inferior work, I should have thrown this thing away after I planked it wrong! I even made a few mistakes that I should have known better about but I don't have any extra materials to redo work with. I have just about enough heavy cord left to make the shrouds on the main mast without having to mix materials. I now have an elevated respect for professional model makers. I might as well consider this model a practice run for the next time I make a model.
  22. 1 point
    James w rogers

    HMS FURY 1942

    Looks amazing! 😎
  23. 1 point
    Jeff B

    HMS FURY 1942

    Splendid piece of history!
  24. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Thanks John
  25. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Spanish Armada Film

    I ran into this. I haven't purchased or watched it yet but it looks interesting. Has anyone seen it? It's on https://www.spanisharmadaireland.com/
  26. 1 point
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Thanks Rob.
  27. 1 point
    Chasseur

    CSS Alabama

    Just got a chance to look at his. Excellent build, really enjoyed the pictures and your progress. Well done Onni, Chass
  28. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    Very nice work. The fine solder work on the bowsprit was excellent. Congratulations.
  29. 1 point
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    Thank-you Onni, and I hope you and your family are well and staying safe! Chass
  30. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    Looks great and a perfect fit. Beautiful job. Well done Chasseur!
  31. 1 point
    Wood by Raven

    Hi from South Africa

    Hi everyone, I am new to your site and through the little bit of checking out the pics before I registered I already love the place. I was introduced to ships in bottles by my dad and our first ship was a Cutty Sark in a Dimple bottle, dad did 99% of the project as I was still young but the bug bit. I did not immediately start building ships at that time but built a lot of aircraft from kits until school and socializing got in the way. I did continue woodworking at school as a subject though and loved it. I took up trying to build a ship to fit a dimple bottle 15 years ago but again a newborn and life got in the way but I loved it so much I kept on tinkering when I had a bit of free time. So why am I here, I now have a bit more free time and after finishing a project that had me make a grip, cheek piece and front grip for a competition FT air rifle from South African Kiaat I simply had to make my next project a completed boat. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEqCD4jX74s) Excuse the glitchy video it was my first attempt at youtube. So I have found three empty dimple bottles and have again decided to make this a Cutty Sark project as I kind of wanted to do the same thing and get my sons involved, as my dad did. The plan is to build a slightly larger Cutty Sark (Stern to tip of Bowsprit 22cm total), this to be kept in a small glass display case. The idea is to present the ship moored at a dock, sails folded and some activity on the dock like provisions and crates or drums ready to be loaded. Once this is done we plan to make project #2 our Cutty Sark in a Dimple bottle at sea, full sails. Any advice on rigging for this scale, what items to make for the dock scene or even links to a similar project would be great. Hope to make many new friends here! Ian
  32. 1 point
    I've finally finished the main mast and rigging. The small scale of the model forced me to approach the build from the bottom to up; from the front to the back and from the inside to out, so not everything gets put in place the way a real ship would be built. I would normally leave details to the end but something like the ensign was easier to apply while the main mast was off the model. The ensign is a 30 star US flag (circa 1850), something I wanted to add to balance the made-in-China stigma of the kit. Some of the tensioning in the rigging might also have been tighter if I didn't need to build in this sequence. The next step is the making and mounting of the four jibs, whose dimensions I need to double check against the dimensions of the model. These should go fairly quickly and I think I'll have enough of the supplied sail cloth to get me through. I find that photographing the model and making these postings forces me to examine my work more closely which helps me find mistakes and do a better job.
  33. 1 point
    Thanks Micky, my sentiments exactly! Along those lines, I spoke with my helmsman and he said he was tired of getting splinters in his hands and a sore back from horsing around that old-fashion tiller, so I upgraded the helm to a more convenient to operate ship's wheel - although it only has five spokes. (I fashioned it out of an old watch gear I had in my box-o-junk and some brass wire for handles). I suppose the original Harvey could have had a tiller and the "desk" in front of it seems consistent with a tiller arrangement but I had to turn the "desk" around and make a wheel box out of it. I finished making the lower dead-eyes and chain plates and mounted them in "double channel" fashion. I turned the dead eyes out of 3/16 dowels (its what I have the most of) and gave them some walnut stain for an antiqued look. I also got a start on the foremast which will be in the paint shop soon.
  34. 1 point
    Hi Lubber, The detail on your ship is incredible, I love it! And, at the end of the day, it's your ship, and if it differs from the original, just say that it went in for a re-fit when you became Captain! Cheers Mick
  35. 1 point
    Thanks Jim! I would have preferred that I knew what ship it was supposed to be before I started building it. However, now that I know I'm seeing so many variations on other models I don't know what is supposed to be accurate. I'm using the model as a practice exercise. I have had to manufacture many of my own parts which I haven't done before so that's slow going with a lot of trial and error. The model won't look as polished as an accurate scale kit build will but as I progress it is kind of endearing its self in me.
  36. 1 point
    I'm just about done with the deck details. I included as many upgrades, embellishments, improvements and details (also mistakes) as I dared. I had some materials left over from two other models that I put to use. I early abandoned all hope of historical accuracy and the scale of the model is too small for true accuracy so I decided to make the model "my own": I upgraded the cannon barrels and carriages and lashed them down; I included two swivel guns in the aft; I fashioned cannon balls from pin heads and mounted them into the ball racks; I made belaying pins from brass wire (I also had some left-overs); I made jackstay eyebolts from brass wire and put the rings in the ring boxes; I found some chain for the anchors and I improved the bowsprit construction. I am most particularly proud of the 21 ft ship's boat that I fashioned out of scrap planking and made a mini planked-up boat out of. This was my first attempt at trying to do this and I planked the boat onto a false frame that I then later chiseled out. I decided to go with the "ship that's been to sea look" than the "ship that came right out of the ship yard" look so somethings look ragged, worn, rusted and damaged (at least that's my excuse!). I'm finishing the bowsprit rigging now. I also fashioned some deadeyes from 3/16" dowel (maybe not the right scale) and mounted them on brass wire chain plates and decided on a "double channel" mounting for them because they would be too difficult to rig if I mounted them against the side boards. On to the foremast next!
  37. 1 point
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    The beginnings of a clipper. Flying Cloud? Cutty Sark? Lightning? Star of India? Not sure.
  38. 1 point
    Spanky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Wow, beautiful work!
  39. 1 point
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Set the Black Pearl inside a small half barrel with a moonlight sky as a backdrop and lit by a small battery Led light. That was the image I had when I first started the model so I'm happy with the way that it turned out.
  40. 1 point
    John Fox III

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    As usual, your detailing is superb Igor! Well done! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  41. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Well, I finally fixed and cut the last thread. I can relax and take a photo of the model with her spars and rigging through the bottle wall. Now, I still have time to clean the inside of the bottle, finalize the design of the cork, and other things associated with the blockage of the bottle.
  42. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    Then I needed only to fix the rigging with glue and to cut the ends of the threads, to install the bottle on the stand and to close the cork.
  43. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    One more test
  44. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    Then I made the parts of masting and gunwales
  45. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    The next update - making of deckhouses
  46. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    Then I made planking of the upper parts of the hull. I have used the planks from black hornbeam for this work
  47. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Schooner AMERICA Scale ̴ 1/800

    So, I begin as usual with making the upper part of the hull and the deck.
  48. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Going for Gold Build - Bessie

    To explain the deck recess, The hull blank was made from Ramin, a Far Eastern hardwood available in 2.2 m lengths in DIY stores at a reasonable price. It’s a pale cream colour, cuts and sands well and holds an edge. I used 4 pieces of square section with a 1mm strip cut on a small table saw between them for the centre line, keel, etc, all pinned with cocktail sticks. I think these are beech; they are definitely hard and I use them for the masts as well. I shaped the hull by taking the excess off using my Proxxon Mill/Drill unit (a present from me to me when the Euro was about 1.60 against the pound – I bought it from a German company - worked out at almost half the UK price) using a small router bit. Then used a combination of a round and square fine micro plane rasps -(http://www.axminster.co.uk/microplane-small-round-rasp-with-handle-951200?gclid=CPft-vqtmswCFbEy0wodSiINNA). These quickly remove wood (fingernails, skin and flesh as well) with little effort, and leave a smooth finish that requires only a little sanding. Photo of Microplanes I then marked out the bulwarks. I have a Proxxon router adapter, but the plate was too big for the curvature and for seeing the work, so I made an adapter plate out of some clear plastic so that I had a depth stop and used a smaller Proxxon drill to plunge route out the excess. Photo of router Hull with most waste removed I finished off by using a combination of small carving chisels inherited from my dad, scalpel blades held in dowel as a handle and sanding as required in conjunction with a depth gauge. I also used the half finished Cap Rail as a template for the deck recess I then shaped the Hull with the microplanes, small files and sanders. Then applied the bulwark stanchions (styrene strip) and painted white with just a hint of grey in it. For the deck planking, I cut strips 1mm wide from some light coloured veneer using a strip cutter I made a few years ago from a piece of aluminium right angle, nuts and bolts, and a single sided razor blade. Thickness of cut is set by using a drill bit as a gauge and a bit of trial and error. The only downside is that you need a straight edge on the veneer to start with and the cut strip is what the cutter is pressed against, but a bit of care and two or three light passes works ok. Photo of strip cutter Next was to use a black marker on one edge of the strips, cut them into 25mm lengths, blacken one end, and then lay them out temporarily on a flat surface using a glue stick; the type used for paper. I’ve found that this holds, but not permanently. The surface was sanded, this ensures a constant thickness, but also removes a lot of any ‘bleed’ from the marker pen, making the caulking look thinner. They were then stained a light oak colour, which is all I had. This is the practice model; Bessie had a teak deck according to the book ‘Whistling for a Wind’ (no drawings or photos – I was disappointed, but it’s a good read anyway) so I may get some teak stain and see how it looks. I then laid the deck in a 5 butt shift. It was a working vessel so I think a bit of unevenness in the caulking is acceptable. Then I added the Caprail All for now Best to all Alan
  49. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Preussen Clipper

    I'll try and get a better close up in daylight, the brigantine is undergoing a refit at present after a shipwreck on launch. Its not to any set scale, but the hull is about 3 inches long. The portholes on the sides of the deckhouse are approx 1.5 mm and the one on the door is approx 1mm. The plasticene is white and just smoothed flush with a finger. I have tube of 0.5 mm dia, so could go smaller if required, but the scales quoted above may be beyond it. Al
  50. 1 point
    Chasseur

    Preussen Clipper

    Life has been very busy however some progress has been made. Seas are painted up and final touch-ups will have to be done inside of the bottle. I have to also add; some spray detail by the hull, some Woodland Scenic water effects by the hull to show some transparency as well, aforementioned done inside the bottle. Cracks will get tighter once conformed in the bottle. Steady as she goes! Dental pick to show the scale..... Happy Father's Day to all who read this.... Jeff
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