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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/23/2020 in Posts

  1. 8 points
    Rende

    Ship in bottle Valuation

    Can anyone tell me anything about this SAB? We believe it to be late 1800’s to early 1900’s? No sails, cork screw bottle. It’s a wealthy family air loom from either England or the Eastern US. that we inherited. If you need additional info or pics let me know. No took the pics with my iPhone , so quality is most likely not good enough for you, but just trying to get a conversation started. The pics make it look like there’s condensation, but there is NO CONDENSATION. Please advise. Thanks !
  2. 8 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Positioned and checked mast heights. Drilled holes through the thin veneer for them and the jib. Also drilled holes carefully through the hull both horizontally and vertically so that the hull should go back together the same after cutting it in half and quarters by joining it with small pegs (cocktail sticks) The outside hull will be covered by a thin styreene that will hide any drill holes. I will have to cut carefully following my pencil line on the deck top so as to keep the mast holes secure and on the centre line. I won't cut the actual deck;it should go in whole.Have to travel to my craft/hobby club ( about half hours drive) to do the cutting of the hull on a band saw as I don't have one here at home.
  3. 7 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi all. Deck planking is done! More to come. Cheers Mick
  4. 6 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Whats so cool about using the clay as a clamping mechanism, to me anyway, is that I can adjust the strings to be where they should be as I go along before I glue them off. On top of that, another benefit of using the clay is that it coats the thread a little bit which makes the hairs in the thread stand down. Of course as a result of this interaction with the clay, you can also run your fingers or a tooth pick over the thread to help make this benefit even more effective, but it gets the job done. It will still glue down with supper glue, no problem. I'm not sure I'm making myself clear here but this utilization of the clay as a construction platform method for rigging is a handy tool for me with my ships so far. Who knows what future builds will require? How many times have I needed ten fingers and someone else to help me glue something off. Using the clay as clamps has virtually eliminated that predicament. I Hope this dissertation helps some one out there. But also keep in mind that there are a million six ways to manage your rigging in this hobby. I just thought I'd bring my particular bent into the fray. Here's a picture of how I touch the thread with super glue after it has been clamped down in the clay for tension, using my glue loaded needle.. This just gets the string to stick there.The next picture is of my applying a half hitch to that same line before I glue it off again and then cut the lead line off. Hope that all this makes sense to you guys. Tomorrow I'm going to try and stick her in the bottle. Fingers crossed.
  5. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Its a bottle that I picked up here in Finland which is a one use bottle with calibrations on the side of it(which will be hidden under the sea; so to speak) It's a bottle that I have never seen before .Has 'Kertapullo' stamped on the bottom which roughly translates to 'one time bottle;' (disposable I suppose).Liquid volume of the bottle is about 2 pints if that gives any indication of the size of the bottle.Hope that helps.
  6. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    Decided to try my hand at a miniature sib, oh what have I let myself in for! It's definatley fun but very fiddly. Starting to realise the fact that I also need some miniature tools as well! 😂
  7. 5 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    There comes a point when I'm rigging that I move the model to a little pillar of cement that a friend gave me and I start working from there cause it's up in the air and I can see it better and pay attention to my lines. Not only that but as you will see in the next pictures I can use the clay as clamps to hold my lines fast while I glue them off. Notice that I have already put the main lines to go out of the bottle and eventually erect my ship on a card of thin cardboard and then taped it to the cement colum .
  8. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    Well after some input from you guys and also after thinking about the huge engineering issues I have to confront building a viking ship with oars in the water and with a sail up, I've decided to go for it. I just started with it today. I may very well fry and burn on this one but it will be here for all to see, good bad or ugly. I've decided to model my ship after a picture I found on Google. I'm not sure if it's a painting or an actual ship that once existed, but I like it's lines and I think I can pull it off. I did a tracing of that picture and am using it as well as other ship plans I've also gleaned off the internet to build this replica of what I am assuming is a raiding vessel. An interesting note to consider about Viking ships is that they build many kinds, all of different beams and lengths. They even build ships for moving live stock across the oceans. Here are some pictures of how I've started this build.
  9. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    As you can see I'm using a tong depressor for the keel and dragons tail /head, rough cutting it out with my hobby jig saw. Obviously I'm going to have to put the dragons head on after the ship is in the bottle so I have separated it from the main keel lines construct. Hopefully this will turn out okay. I like the lines on this drawing and the fact that there aren't so may oars is a plus for me . After all I just want to get the idea across in a bottle. More to come as I go along.
  10. 4 points
    exwafoo

    Viking ship with oars?

    Bluenoser, 1/72 scale, ie 1 inch to 6 feet. The SIB will be about 6 inches long, a small Drakar, or 'Dragon Ship'. The figures are as shown. An internet search will show suppliers. I decided to buy them as I'm not confident of carving any. The planned bottle is a 2½ litre cider bottle that gives enough height for the mast. Regards Alan PS: Oars, shields, and sea chests (used for sitting on) are also in the box. The figures comprise rowers, a helmsman, and others in various poses for working ship.
  11. 4 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus!) This build is going to take me months, as I have to learn how to do and make everything. So any comments, criticisms, pointers where I'm going wrong, etc will be more than welcome. Thanks. Mick
  12. 4 points
    James : Thank you so much and by the way you can rip me off anytime. I'm easy.. LOL. Sometimes I think in this art we forget to share things we made to make our life easier in dealing with the problematic situations we eventually find ourselves having to deal with. With tenacity we resolve ourselves to find a way to get around these circumstance.. In other words, so much of what we do to make things happen for us are totally up to our own resources and ingenuity. This tool I made for example is the result of that kind of situation. Which I had now way to resolve by using tweezers or whatever else was available to me at the time. I had to invent something and I did. Then I made it with no real expectation that it would work at all, although I had a pretty good idea it was going to be better than anything I had at the time to Get-er Done. These are the kinds of things that so attract me to this art. The fact that I'm at sea and it's up to me to get us home safe and sound. It's a pleasure for me too to have so many ship mates that know where I'm coming from. Thanks James and best regards, Bruce
  13. 4 points
    DSiemens

    Ship in bottle Valuation

    Definitely well built. Who ever built is had a really good knowledge of sailing ships. The rigging is very accurate. The carving is also very clean. They were very skilled. Can I get a closer picture of the flag. At a glance it appease to be American. Can I also get a picture looking almost parallel to the surface of the glass looking down the bottle? What I think I'm seeing is the first to photo's is horizontal rings in the bottle. This suggests it was made in a turn mold. From my research this puts the bottle between 1880 and 1915. https://sha.org/bottle/body.htm#Turn molds The lack of sails suggests pre 1915 as well but that's more of a guess based on other models I've seen than a general rule. The style having a town in the back ground suggests early 1900's to me as well. Can I get more pictures of the town? It's possible it depicts an actual location. If we can identify the lighthouse that can tell us more. It's a beautiful work of art. The stopper is especially unique. It's very rare to see stoppers like that. As I said before who ever built this was very skilled.
  14. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Daniel: I spent the last three days on the waves and the hull cavity. The largest amount of that time was washing away the clay that got on the bottles side. Acetone and cotton cloth. I still am going to go over all the glass again with some Windex before I put her in. This is the same Plasticine that you recommended to me and it literally melted to a liquid. The color seems to be fine though. Right now I'm in the midst of rigging her up. Hopefully she'll be bottled before the weekend is over. Regards B.
  15. 3 points
    DSiemens

    1st miniature sib

    I saw in another post someone had trouble with the synthetic paint brush bristles. I use ones that are made from hair. Probably horse hair. They already have a tan sort of color. experiment with different ones and see what happens.
  16. 3 points
    Jeff B

    Viking ship with oars?

    Side view. Once in the bottle, can set the joint straight with adhesive.
  17. 3 points
    Pretty ingenious, I can see that being very useful. May have to try that also.
  18. 3 points
    James w rogers

    CSS Alabama

    That's OK onni! Put anything you like on there, I will just take all the credit! 😂 Your build is, looking great, love the deck, very nicely done also a great looking bottle, very nice shape! 😎
  19. 2 points
    John: You continue to amaze me with you inventive techniques! This is a stellar representation of grates. Thanks so much for sharing this process with us. I'm sure I'll apply it on one of my builds in the future. It's just so clean and neat!. Regards Bruce
  20. 2 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking ship with oars?

    Exwafoo: I had no idea that you could buy little men like this! In the past I've always made my sailors out of wire and then dipped them or painted the wire with acrylic paint to flesh them out. Here's a picture of one that's kinda beat up cause I reclaimed him from a snafu build from years ago. They can actually turn out pretty sweet. Normally I painted them like they were wearing fowl weather gear but the Vikings would have to be painted differently. This guy is about 3/8 of an inch tall.
  21. 2 points
    Jeff B

    Viking ship with oars?

    For Bruce. Opposite of prior description. Wood with rubber band flexi joint.
  22. 2 points
    Very nice work John. Thanks for sharing.
  23. 2 points
    Very intricate work. Looks great!
  24. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Ship in bottle Valuation

    So I received an email regarding an old ship in bottle that some one had. They wanted more information and possible value. Some how that email disappeared before I could respond to it so I thought I'd post something real quick. If you emailed through the contact us email please email again I'd like to answer your questions. As far as valuation goes it starts with authenticating the bottle. Looking at the bottle and finding clues on how it was made which can help determine when it was made. If a bottle was made using a method from the 1950's it can be determined that the ship in bottle is no older than the 1950's. If the bottle was made using methods from the late 1800's then it could have been built anytime after that. So the bottle is a great way to start. Materials and objects in the bottle can also help. I have found that most ships in bottles prior to around 1920ish don't have sails on them. This is not a hard fast rule but as I have delved into older ships in bottles it seems more and more had sails the later they were built. This is possibly the way that ship in bottle methods were passed on. I don't know for sure. All I can say is theres enough evidence to say if the bottle a ship is in was built between 1900 and 1930 and it doesn't have sails there is a strong possibility that the ship was put in before 1920. It's still a guess but an educated one. As far as valuation goes ships in bottles are unfortunately not work a whole lot. As far as antique markets are concerned they are trinkets and folk art. At most a 100 year old ship in bottle is probably worth $300. If it has a great story that could be authenticated it might be pushed to $400....maybe. It's a big maybe. Most I've seen sell for $100 to $250. If any one has old ships in bottles that they'd like more info on please post pictures and share it. Our membership loves digging into the details and often small seemingly insignificant parts can tell a big story. For instance the ship in bottle in the header of this website portrays Devin England and has a windmill. That windmill blew down in 1919. So I can reasonably say the ship in bottle was likely built before then because the builder knew the windmill was there. It also points to the builder's knowledge of Devon England. The lack of sails also points to being built earlier in the 1900's. These little details can tell a lot about a ship and the builder. So post your old ships in bottles. We'd love to tell you about them.
  25. 2 points
    James w rogers

    AMERICA

    Looks amazing! Excellent job. 😁 The roped stand is a touch of class!
  26. 2 points
    James w rogers

    CSS Alabama

    Nice job! That deck looks great! 😎
  27. 2 points
    Thanks Bruce, That looks like something I'll need in the future! Cheers Mick
  28. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Ship in bottle Valuation

    I met someone a while ago that had this ship in bottle. He said the previous owner claimed it was made by a prisoner of war in Canada. It does have the screw top though.
  29. 1 point
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    Yes I see that, I tried a couple of synthetic ones as an experiment, and find they also kink when bending too much and dont straighten back out! Will definatley try some hair ones another time as I've already made the yards out of thinned down cocktail sticks. I'm also going to try some broom bristles as they are also a good size. 😁
  30. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Viking ship with oars?

    I was going to see if anyone would reply to this first. I've never done it but I've seen it done. I want to say David Lavoie has done it. I haven't seen him on this site in a while but he frequents the Facebook group. Seems like theres a couple ways to do it. If you can get them to hinge on the ship you can attach the oars and put the whole ship in at once. Perhaps glue a piece of thread to the end of each oar and then glue the other end of the thread to the hull. Then on the other end of the oars glue a continuous thread that connects each oar. Tightening that thread will get all the oars to their equal spacing. Adjust as needed and cover that end with clay or paint to blend it into the sea. Another method would be insert each oar one by one along the ship. It's tedious but it would work. Or mix the two and have a thread on both ends of the oar like a rope ladder. Insert the oars separately and glue one side to the hull and put the other in the sea. This risks having the thread show on the side of the hull though. Or use a flexible material. Glue paintbrush bristles in as the oars and bend them even with the hull as they go in once in they'll popback out into place. They may bend a little but if they aren't bent to far and if anchored in the sea material I think you could get them to straiten back out. It's work testing. Let us know what you end up doing. I don't think a method for this has been recorded on this site yet.
  31. 1 point
    MickyK

    1st miniature sib

    This should be fun!! Personally, I have my limits! But I'll keep watching. Mick
  32. 1 point
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Thanks tazam, It was the only way I could figure out how to make them robust, and also follow the sheer- line of the ship! Mick
  33. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    AMERICA

    Very nice model Bruce. The sails are excellent and I like your idea of filling the trough with epoxy.
  34. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Ship in bottle Valuation

    It is a mystery stopper. I've never seen one in a bottle this old.
  35. 1 point
    Micky I'm pretty sure I've read the thread about the mast handling tool and I'm pretty sure that there is a YouTube video of it being used. I have yet to build a ship without the masts already on the hull but I'm itching to try it. When I do I'll defiantly make one of those tools. It's pretty sweet how it works. Regards Bruce.
  36. 1 point
    This will be awesome.... Can't wait to see it. -- Bill
  37. 1 point
    Onni

    San paolo 1743 xambekk malta.

    Wow,that was quick. Looks like it's going to be a cool build😎
  38. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Mini Clipper

    Some times I get a ship done and find I get into an in between ship slump. I find miniships are a good way to get myself back in the groove. Besides that I needed to test out a new toy. This is a dremel 2050 Stylo. Its by far the smallest dremel I ever owned and I'm loving it! Got some burs too so I can do some real small details.
  39. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    HMS Ramillies

    Lovely model Joe. Looks really authentic. I once made a model of HMS Belfast in her dazzle paint. It was a kit and I found the result very satisfying, especially the dazzle effect.
  40. 1 point
    Mizzen mast and sail are in and fixed, 2 more to go! In the foreground is my trusty paper clip on a stick, it's so useful. 😁
  41. 1 point
    First coat of paint for sea.
  42. 1 point
    DSiemens

    AMERICA

    I used to have that super power too. I was near sighted from 2nd grade and wore glasses and contacts most my life. Building Sibs I'd push my glasses down and look over them. I could see anything up close with no trouble at all. Last year I got Lasik and lost my super power. Now I'm using magnifiers like the rest of the "normal" people.
  43. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Terminology Help

    Here's the pdf version of the rigging primer. I can't always get the html version in the zip file to work. -Rigging Primer by John Fox III.pdf
  44. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Great work Mick. She looks great. Great idea on the acetone. It's not something I would have thought of and took some time but it worked. I agree you shouldn't have to modify the ship if it's coming as a kit. You made it work though she really looks good.
  45. 1 point
    As a kid I always had a fascination with naitical folk art & pretty much anything that was encased in glass. Ships in bottles being one example. I am fortunate enough to remember some of the old ‘true seamen’ of the town who were regarded as heroes. Visiting their homes with my parents or granparents would be a wonderful experience a bit like wondering arount a curiosity store. Almost every home would have at least one ship in a bottle. I was given a lovely piece as a gift from an old fellow from the Morris family. Even today looking at the little schooner fills me with wonder. Although I am new to this I did manage to build a ‘decent’ SIB that I was happy with. Sadly I did not create a build log. I have posted a photo on the FB page & will do on the forum once I figure out how. Atb Capten
  46. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Next, to me was necessary to sort out the threads, temporarily fasten the ends on the outside of the bottle with tape, and, slowly, begin their stretching, fixing, and cutting excess.
  47. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Then I installed and fixated the steering wheel, binnacle and the winch. And several views of the deck, before placing the upper part of the hull into the bottle
  48. 1 point
    Hi Don, that is a great story of how/what inspired you to become associated with ships in bottles. I find it interesting that for most of us, it was someone in our past who had an influence on us. Great story! Thanks for sharing it with us. Gwyl
  49. 1 point
    Hey Don that is one awesome story. I too had an old timer years ago. Mine had a two tone brownish handle. They were and still are great knifes. I gave mine to my eldest son when he was 7 years old and we made many small ship models but never put them in bottles. The best thing a Dad can do is leave a heritage and pass it on to the next generation. Blessing your grandchildren with your time and stories of old are things they shall never forget. Good on you to get back into the hobby, Blessings to you and yours and welcome aboard. You will like this group as everyone is kind, knowledgable, and trustworthy! Jeff
  50. 1 point
    Hey Jeff, Some great reading from everyone. My story goes back To my grandfather who was an avid whittler. He was one of those that you see sitting on the front porch after everything was done relaxing with a knife and a chunk of wood. As an 8 year old, it seemed like he could carve anything. He gave me my first pocket knife. A yellow handle old timer. I'd give anything to find that knife. One year he made all of us grandkids a SIB for Christmas. Nothing elaborate but still enough to amaze all of us. Being the oldest, I was privy to this beforehand and watched him as he put them all together. Each one in a different bottle. It was literally an amazing site to see as was everyone's surprise when they opened them that Christmas. Soon after, he had passed away and the thought of ship building gave way to all the other things related to adolescence. Off and on something would happen that would bring those memories back, even as stated in another story on here, the 4th pirates movie. But it wasn't until a couple of months ago, when I turned 50 and there was this bottle that that i came across, that looked exactly like the one that my grandfather made for me and I had this overwhelming urge to finally give it a try and see if I can't produce the same memories for my future grandchildren that my grandfather did for me and that has led me here to this website and you good people.
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