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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/25/2019 in Posts

  1. 10 points
    Starting a new build The Golden Swan based on the 1588 English Galleon as pictured in Wolfram Zu Mondfeld book "Historic Ship Models" The hull is carved from sourwood. Usually I use Holly but wanted to try a different wood. The deck will be spit from the hull so the ship will be in two pieces so it can be placed in the bottle when done. I am building her in between sessions with my Cutty Sark that I am also building. Here is a picture of The Cutty Sark I am working on. Too big to fit in a bottle.
  2. 9 points
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    Checking some clearances just to be sure!
  3. 9 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Had to check how she looks stuck in the ice!
  4. 9 points
    Then I installed the mast, pulled up the rigging gear, added some small details and flooded the third layer of the sea
  5. 9 points
    Then I connected all the parts of the boat on the slipway
  6. 9 points
  7. 9 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    I like to use matt black spray paint as it dries in just a few minutes so you don't have to wait around for it to dry for an age.Marked out the deck and drilled holes where I want the masts and bowsprit to go.The veneer deck will go in as one solid piece. Will carry on with the construction of the masts and slicing the hull into four sections so that all the pieces will be able to go through the bottle neck without any struggle.Masts and bowsprit constructed with a little help from styrene.They will be sprayed matt white.
  8. 9 points
    Lubber123

    My Goja SIB build

    Since I decided to revive my interest in ship in the bottle builds, I revisited my original first kit builds from the “Ships A Sailin’” line from the 1970’s. My first ever build was their “Lively Lady” and my second ever build was another of their kits. I pulled out the instruction sheet that I still have from this series which has no identification for the ship on it. For many years I was under the impression that this build was their “Skeeter” but after finding an old kit for sale I realized that I had actually built their “Goja”. I first started to perfunctorily build this ship accordingly to the dimensions I had on the instruction sheet when I remembered that I was never quite pleased with my first result. I had given this build away as a gift so I no longer had it for reference. I looked at the squat dimensions of the whole ship on the instruction sheet and the cautionary words that the model had been modified to adapt it to the bottle when I wondered if this was actually a historical representation. At the time I had no idea what the “Goja” was, my “Lively Lady” certainly wasn’t a historically accurate ship so I assumed that this was another fanciful creation. After a cursory investigation, I was hooked. The “Goja” is the ship that Norwegian Explorer Roald Amundsen sailed to make the first successful voyage across the North West Passage in 1906. The ship still exists today in a museum in Fram, Norway and previously had spent many years in a park in San Francisco, Ca so it is well documented and photographed. I managed to find a sail and rigging plan and pulled up a few photos to help me get as historically close to the ship as possible. I even watched a video documentary about the Arctic Explorers and the quest to find the North West Passage. After Amundsen completed the passage, he landed in Alaska and had to Nordic ski 500 miles just to send a telegraph to announce his completion. I was so impressed with this story I decided I had to do this model due diligence and effort. I didn’t want to end up with a “bottle with a ship model in it” I wanted a “ship model that happened to be encased in a glass bottle” instead. I found a nice bottle in my collection that complemented the dimensions of the plan although it was a bit challenging to work in. I tried to match the color scheme of the hull, I made a nice suit of sails from cloth instead of paper (I really prefer the cloth sails to paper now), I took some care with trying to make a flat Arctic sea with ice floes and an Arctic tundra backdrop and I sealed the bottle with a Scandinavian coin (OK, it’s Swedish, not Norwegian and it isn’t from 1906 but it looks cool) and made another “decorative braid” knot for the neck. I even tried my hand at a miniature Norwegian flag to fly from its ensign line. Had I had the presence of mind, I would have made a Norwegian flag of the banner but the flag was an afterthought. Most of these details are not visible in the photograph. After it was completed it struck me how the bottle mounted on its side mimics the silhouette of the ship with the neck being its prow. So here it is, my homage to Roald Amundsen, my eighth ever SIB.
  9. 8 points
    John Zuch

    My "Waterwitch"

    Like you I to used Jack Needham's book for my model of the Waterwitch
  10. 8 points
    Then I poured the first layer of the sea and placed the underwater part of the boat in it.
  11. 8 points
  12. 8 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Painted the masts and bowsprit and added some ratline rigging to the masts. Fashioned a couple of catheads out of some thicker styrene and also used styrene for the lifeboat supports at the stern.Of course I could use wood but as these pieces are going to be white; then it is much easier too fashion them out of plastic.
  13. 8 points
    Lubber123

    Trio in a Triangle Bottle

    I’ve been continuing to follow the examples in Jack Needham’s “Modeling Ships in Bottles”. I had already finished the first example “A Simple Model for Beginners”. Although I am more experienced than a basic beginner, I found making the basic model to be a good refresher. I don’t follow Needham’s method of rigging; I don’t use as many control lines as he suggests and I rig the shrouds in to holes in the gunnels instead of rigging them through the underside of the hull. Here I progressed to his second model, a four masted lumber schooner. I had the dilemma of trying to find an appropriate bottle for it since the model is long but not very tall. I also had a uniquely shaped bottle that my father had saved for me many years ago with the thought that “maybe you could put a ship in it someday”. It’s a long tapered triangle shaped bottle that once contained Sicilian Gold Marsala. So as a tribute to my Sicilian ancestry I wanted to use the bottle. I switched over from the clay-dough modeling clay I had previously used and instead purchased some plumber’s putty that I colored with water-soluble artist grade oil paints mixing Ultramarine Blue with some Viridian Green for the sea, using the base neutral color for the wave tops. I also switched back to cloth sails which I seem to prefer. Once I placed the lumber schooner into the back end of the bottle, I realized it looked a little lonely so I repeated Needham’s “Exercise One” and made a basic two masted fishing schooner to keep it company. Once I added the fishing schooner, I still had some “dead space” in the neck to fill so I added a small headland background with a few buildings and put a small skipjack sailboat in front of that to give the illusion of all three running into port. I finished the neck with a “Turk’s Head” knot that I built a special jig for so I could get it right this time. It’s still tough to make, even with a jig. So here is my diorama “fleet” heading into port. This is the first time I put multiple ships in a bottle and I’m encouraged enough to use this method again on some of my longer bottles.
  14. 7 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    HMS Terror; together with HMS Erebus were modified Royal Navy ships that attempted to find the North West passage through the ice packs of King William Islands in the Canadian Arctic in 1845.Terror was the first Royal navy ship to be fitted with screw power from a locomotive engine. The expedition failed and unfortunately all the crews of both ships perished. The wreck of Terror was discovered in 2016. Shaped the hull from some Alder wood and cut and fixed the bulwarks with styrene, overlapping at the bow end with super glue.The prow of Terror was reinforced with metal plates and I have tried to imitate these with strips of styrene.Added bowsprit and she's ready for painting.
  15. 7 points
    Then I made some more small details for this composition
  16. 7 points
    Many thanks for your feedback, John! So, the next step is to check all the parts of the model.
  17. 7 points
    Hey to all! So, I'm back here again and I'm still working.)
  18. 7 points
    A short update. I have added the fore and aft decks to the hull. The decks have been painted a light gray. I have drilled the holes for the masts which I intend to put thread into the bottom of the mast and pass it through the hull. I also placed a grove on the underside of the hull so I can run the threads for the masts out of the hull when the ship gets placed in the gallon bottle. I also decided to stain the planks for the hull a dark walnut and the planking will be the next step.
  19. 6 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Added all the spars which I had made earlier and started the rigging and sail plan. Note also the chimney of the locomotive engine which propelled this early screw ship coming up through the deck.
  20. 6 points
    James w rogers

    The princess royal 1841

    Just found this on a carboot sale, £3.00! Box sealed with very old dried out sticky tape, so I thought I won’t damage the box and try to open it, I will wait until I get home and gently cut the tape and open it. So I set off home, excited to see what looks like a great find from 1988, once home I carefully open the box to find everything but.....?..
  21. 6 points
    Lubber123

    My Elsie 1/8" Scale Build

    This is my Model Shipways MS2005 “Elsie” Gloucester Fishing Vessel circa 1910, solid carved hull, made in 1/8” = 1 ft scale. No, I’m not going to put it in a bottle since it is almost 2 ft long and 1.5 ft tall. The only reason I’m posting it here is that this is the impetus that got me back to modeling ships in bottles. I’ve had this kit since Christmas 1979. I worked on it a bit back in the 1980’s and put it away. It had been sitting partially completed with its parts in a box on top of my work bench in my basement for almost 25 years until I decided to overcome the “paralysis of analysis” and finish it this winter. I didn’t realize until I was almost finished with it that Model Shipways was still in business and that they would provide me replacement parts, free of charge. A variety of factors had prevented me from finishing this model. First off, I had very little instructional material to help me with the build. These days these kits come with very detailed and complete instructions but back in 1979 about all I had was a set of plans and a brief instruction sheet that may as well have just said “use wooden parts to construct model to plans”. Then, in my impetuous youth, I made some rookie mistakes that deemed the model less than “museum quality”. I had to come to the realization that I wasn’t going to send it to a museum, it would only be displayed for my pleasure and at 1/8” scale I probably could never get museum accuracy anyway. I also had to decide if I was going to put sails on it even though Model Shipways didn’t recommend sail work, especially for rookies. I worked on this model almost 8 hrs a day, 7 days a week for a full month. It was “unfinished business” and I wanted to complete it but also to get it as right as possible. I scrapped inferior work and reworked it if I had to. I still made some rookie mistakes and I’m not sure I belayed all the lines to all the correct places but I was damn proud of it when I was finished. I also realized how little I knew about sailing ships even though I had built five ship-in-the bottles before. I learned the value of having good plans, of measuring accurately and working patiently and a few other small tricks – all that applies to ship-in-the-bottles. Therefore, I have to recommend that if you want to become a better SIB builder, try one of these larger scale models at least once (with a pre-carved hull – planking a built up ship is a whole other world). I came away from this exercise with a new confidence that now I could do higher quality work than I had in my youth and I wanted to reprise some of my early SIB fails.
  22. 6 points
    Niallmhor

    Something I tried many moons ago

    Hi all, While serving in the military, I did once try and put a a ship in a bottle, this was a plastic 'man of war' in a glass bottle , I've still got it but it's not the same as putting something made from wood , paper and thread with my own hands into a bottle . I've never made anything from wood bar a fruit bowl I made at school many years ago but, with all the encouragement I've got from all of you maybe this will be something I can be proud of and say with pride " I made that" . I want to learn as much as I can from all of you . Maybe one day I'll put a Stalwart in a bottle , how? I've got no idea but how hard can it be ?
  23. 5 points
    Made some progress I have started planking the hull. Slow going as I am also working on my Cutty doing ratlines. Deciding how I am going to attach the planking to the upper deck as this is the part that separates.
  24. 5 points
    DSiemens

    How to do water

    I agree it probably is a chemical patent and they are all different. Definitely experiment and find what works for you. As far as the wire method. I use coat hanger wire so its pretty stiff. It does take some practice and patience. I do have a photo I need to add to my current build log. Notice the wire is placed just before the mast and holds the ship down. I'm holding the forestay line with the same hand I'm holding the wire with. I use my free hand to pull the line tight and work my tools. First thing I do is tighten the line where I want it to check that every thing is working. Second I loosen the line a little bit. With a second wire I put a dab of super glue on the line right in front of the thread block or hole the line is being pulled through. I pull that wire out and tighten the line. Since I use super glue this takes about five seconds. Last, once the glue is dry I go back with a razor blade on the end of a wire and cut the line. All of this is done with one hand on the wire holding the ship down and the other working the tools. The advantage is you can maneuver the ship to reach lines easier than you would if the ship was glued down. Also on a catastrophic failure you can cut the rigging and pull the ship out with out breaking the bottle.
  25. 5 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Added a bit more hull embellishments to smarten up the stern and added the white boards around the hull upon which the main rigging ratlines are attached.
  26. 5 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    A bit crude stern windows..
  27. 5 points
    Lubber123

    My "Waterwitch"

    I have been working my way through the examples in Jack Needham’s “Modeling Ships in Bottles”. Here I’ve completed his third of four exercises, “The Waterwitch” which is modeled after an actual historical ship although I am having some difficulty confirming his back-story about the ship since there seems to have been many ships named the Waterwitch. The exercise here was to graduate to making yardarms and square sails which are present here only on the foremast. In my youth I had skipped over all the preliminary exercises and went right into square rigged ships but here I felt I wanted to go back and practice my basics. I also wanted to make use of my collection of bar bottles left over from my father’s bar tending days and here I made use of a Dubouchet liqueur bottle which I felt was nicely ornamented. I also practiced my hand at another head-land back ground with some obligatory sea-side buildings and a little greenery in the hill side. I switched over to a sea made from plumber’s putty colored with artist grade water soluble oil paints which seems nicely compatible and I think this will be my future go-to formula. I also went back and tried making paper sails but I think I prefer cloth sails. I just found some nice antiqued sail cloth which I think will make nice sails for my future SIBs. I also have some tan resume paper which might also be worth trying. I made another attempt at a Turk’s Head knot again using my jig but I think I need to start with a bit more length of cord. Anyway, again the photograph doesn’t do the model justice and I’m happy to have this one in my fleet.
  28. 5 points
    Many thanks, Jeff and Jesse! Jesse, I'm using a syringe with the long tube for this.
  29. 5 points
    DSiemens

    Pod Cast

    I thought I'd share I was on a podcast talking about building ships in bottles. https://therecoveringcpa.com/episode-183-daniel-siemens/
  30. 5 points
    The next step was put two halves of the above-water part of the boat in a bottle and put them in their places and to fill in the second layer of the sea.
  31. 5 points
    Great work Igor! Fascinating watching your development of Captain Jack Sparrow! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  32. 5 points
    The next important step is turning the figure into Jack. I did not have any experience with figures, so I decided to improvise
  33. 5 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    Cut the hull up into four sections on a small hobby bandsaw that will allow it to be assembled together inside the bottle later on. I make sure that the pieces of the hull can fit together easily and without too much effort and that everything lines up and that the join lines are not that noticeable. Use cut cocktail sticks as pegs for joining, making sure that everything aligns.
  34. 5 points
    A little more work on the deck and I started installing the foldable bulwarks or Gunnels for you old salts out there. Wivern could drop her bulwarks and fire a broadside either side with the use of swivel turrets.
  35. 5 points
    Lubber123

    Something I tried many moons ago

    Hi Niallmhor, If you did this, you have the basic idea. I've always enjoyed the carving and shaping of the hull as the fun part. Shaping the spars is a bit tedious. The rigging is intricate but rewarding. Inserting the model and righting it on the putty sea can expose faults in construction, especially if the neck is a narrow diameter. But remember, the model can always be pulled back out if things aren't right (I've had to do this a few times). Even if you glue the stays down and discover that something isn't right, you can cut the rigging and extract the model and re-rig it and try again. Since you created the model, you can always fix it. The putty sea doesn't dry out or harden very quickly so extraction is always an option. You don't have to accept defects and don't be afraid to scrap work and re-work it.
  36. 4 points
    exwafoo

    How to do water

    Hi Bruce, All. Plasticene. Gained fame when Aardman Animations used it to make the Wallace and Grommit characters. In the UK its trade name is now 'Newplast'. It comes in a variety of colours in 1kg blocks (which makes it expensive on shipping so I go to an art supply shop) however it does do a lot of SIBs. The block is about 12 x 2 x 1.5 inches in size and is made up from a number of ' round section rods/extrusions which can be peeled off as required. This is useful for mixing colour. eg, I take an inch of blue, and add, say, 1/4 inch of green and 1/8 inch of black. mix well.If this is the colour of the sea you want, that's the ratio to use. Adjust until happy. I only have blue, green, white and black. You do not need a lot of black to darken, its a very intense dye. Does not need baking, the heat of your hands softens it and it stiffens up when not being worked. Assuming the bottle is going to be on its side, I choose the best side of the bottle, then I mark on the outside of the bottle the level I want, keeping the lower seam level with the top of the sea. This helps hide it and moves the other seam to just the other side of the top of the bottle so that it does not stand out as much. I PVA a strip of paper with the ship's details, date of bottling, my details, etc on the inside bottom, with the print facing out. Once dry, the plasticene can go in. I use 'sausages' fed through the neck then flattened using whichever tool is best for the job. My new favourite is a length of stainless steel rod that detached from a badly made barbie grill, with one end bent at right angles, the ends having been ground flat and smooth. The glass can play tricks on your eye so have an occasional look through the neck as the plasticene goes in. Once the basic sea is in, then shape the waves, put the hull in, make the recess, add foam etc, and remove the hull. The plasticene never really hardens, just stiffens up, so grips the hull nicely during trial fits, but releases easily enough to get the hull out again. I tend to work with split hulls so the bottom can stay in when finished. I have started to coat the sea with slightly dilute PVA to give it a gloss shine. It takes a few coats. I also glue the hull in as well. I have always found holding the SIB in the bottle whilst working on it a bit of a problem. I acquired an Amati SIB kit at our convention (I'll do a build log eventually), and it shows way of holding the SIB in the bottle that I'm going to try. It consts of a 'C' shaped piece of brass on the end of a rod. The 'C' is the shape of half the hull, from bow to stern, with the other half being thread from the far end of the 'C', through a hole at the fwd end and out of the neck, the whole being a type of lasso. It would allow the SIB to be held, manoeuvred, positioned and then released. Excuse bad drawing, but it should get the idea over. Another method I saw on a video (can't remember which one) was to use a length of dowel between the SIB and the top of the inside of the bottle, basically just jamming it in place. (never tried this) I've never noticed the plasticene causing any condensation. I also found this link and I've been trying to work out if the stuff could be used in a bottle. AK water gel Have a good Easter break Alan
  37. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    How to do water

    Hi guys : I haven't built a ship in a bottle for a few decades now and am just starting up again. In the past I always used Blue RTV silicone for my seas but as the years go by some of them develop a crystalline like substance that looks all the world like someone sprinkled a salt shaker in there. Aside from that there was the sometimes but not always fogging up of the bottle from off gasses. Pain in the but to clean up. Anyway I've decided to give the Plasticine method a go but I need some things clarified a bit . Exwafoo, you say you put the hull blank into the Plasticine before you have painted it cause the clay sticks to it. Do you have problems with it not wanting to come out of it's recess? So when you finish the build and place the hull in for the last time do you somehow glue it to the recess?? My concern is that once I start pulling on the strings to raise everything that the ship is liable to come out of it's seat?? That would certainly be a problem. Next I'd like to know if you don't bake it how long do you wait before you place the hull into this material for final assembly?? How long do you wait before you cork the bottle? Seems to me that without some air flow getting to the Plasticine, it would stay soft for a long time. What brand of Plasticine do you use?? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Attached is a 35 year old model with the crystalline salt like stuff growing on the sea.
  38. 4 points
    Fantastic detail Igor. I love the rope work on the bottles and the little wicker basket looks great. Bernard
  39. 4 points
    Just a quick update/ I removed the upper part of the ship and made new parts which are permanently glued to the hull. I made a separate poop deck which will be attached once the ship is in the bottle. Pictures to follow.
  40. 4 points
    It is an informative video...provided you can get past the dumb jokes & bad puns. Have attached the link to that show below. Do not think that it is shared on this forum. https://video.unctv.org/video/woodwrights-shop-ship-bottle/
  41. 4 points
    Chasseur

    Trio in a Triangle Bottle

    Outstanding job Lubber! Excellent use of space and artistic balance. Beautiful work on the base, very appealing to the eye! 10 out of 10. Jeff
  42. 3 points
    Jeff B

    How to do water

    Dr. Morrison has a nice demo on The Curiousity Show on YouTube. Keyword search Ship in bottle. Also see The Woodwrights Shop. Season 26 ep.1 also found in YouTube. I like the ice cream stick method because plasticine really stays soft and flexible so the ship can pull out. Glued to a ice cream stick in the bottom of the bottle, the ship is firm. Fair winds, Jeff
  43. 3 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    Just a Sharpie waiting to go in the bottle.
  44. 3 points
    Lubber123

    Trio in a Triangle Bottle

    Thanks Bernard! The model sort of came together on its own. Once I built the Lumber Schooner, it looked so lonely in the back of the bottle I just had to give it company. And once I built the accompanying fishing schooner, I found some spare parts for the skipjack that just filled the neck. I never had a plan, it just came together on its own.
  45. 3 points
    Onni

    HMS Terror

    For the bulwarks I use 0,3 mm thickness. It's very thin and pliable but can split if you're not careful. It's also opaque so needs a good paint cover. For the bowsprit support I use 0,5 mm styrene.
  46. 3 points
    Thanks for the kind words and yes it has ben scratch built but received the hull from my son. It sat in my ship room for 8 or 9 years. I finally decided to build it. All I had was some plans for a clipper ship and plane from the Scientific model. So even though the hull was complete I have scratched built the rest. I also purchased Longridges book on the Cutty Sark and used it for references. I am doing the ratlines right now and it has been a year since I started the build.
  47. 3 points
    Lubber123

    Something I tried many moons ago

    I've recently purchased a selection of kits just to see what they are about. One is a paper everything with a glass bottle and cork. This is a travesty that should never be allowed to be perpetrated. Even the decorative seal, which should be cord, is paper. What a waste of a piece of glass. The next is a very nice kit by Airfix with a nice large rectangular bottle that was made in France but has a plastic ship model...Egads! My other two at least have wooden parts and one has an instruction manual that even a experienced builder could learn some tricks from. Ok, there are no rules. But I'd like to maintain the connection to the original modelers who only had limited materials and tools but had a lot of imagination and time on their hands.
  48. 3 points
    DSiemens

    Something I tried many moons ago

    That actually looks really good. There's no rules on medium. Use what ever you like. Paper is totally allowed. Wood is a lot of fun too. I think it's more forgiving than paper. My philosophy with wood has always been cut big then sand smaller. You can't sand paper down really. It shreds and folds. If you can build a paper ship in bottle I think you are very capable of building a wood one.
  49. 3 points
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    The first of the two James Miller models is finally completed. Still have to finish up the light bulb stand and the stand to hold the model on the bottom of the bulb. There is a second model, at present it is at the stage of ready to start mounting the masts. The second is a static display model, so in some ways it easier to rig.
  50. 2 points
    Lubber123

    The princess royal 1841

    Hi James, I just bought one of these kits also but not at the bargain you got. The putty will be hardened and useless by now but no big deal since putty availability is not a problem. My bottle was made in France and doesn't have the imprint on it. But these Authentic Model kits are just about the best I've seen at the price ( the Amati models look superb but are almost $100 USD). I also have an AM "Privateer" that I think is a better kit but not modeled on an historic model. The Privateer kit has a nice hardwood hull that I had trouble getting an electric drill to hole. It also comes in a neat little wood box. I couldn't resist starting to build the model but had to shelve it for a while so it's still in "dry dock". The instruction sheet is excellent. I've collected about six different kits now and these are my favorite. I'm sure you will enjoy this build.
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