Jump to content
Bottled Ship Builder

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/24/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    I cheat! Well not really, I purchase photo etched railings from a Polish company called GPM (they produce mainly card models) but they also sell photo etched railings and other items. Of course I paint the railings first and then super glue them in place. Nice railings make a model stand out I think. If I tried to make them myself it would be a horrible mess I used 1:400 railings. The one's in the picture are 1:250.
  2. 2 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Went out and bought some light blue felt just to finish off the inside of the old whiskey box and added/glued the ship's badge onto the side...and she's done. Pity Dad's not around to see it ,think he would of loved her.
  3. 1 point
    exwafoo

    HMS FURY 1942

    Ship's badge is a nice touch. Alan
  4. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Going for Gold Build - Bessie

    It’s been a while since I updated the build. I didn’t manage to get the SIBs bottled in time for the Ball Auction, an unexpected life event left me with no time for hobbies for a while. However, the organisers were happy to auction them on the basis of a photograph and I’d bottle them up and deliver them later. My sincere thanks to the organisers and the winners who bid for them for their patience I have now finished them, and they will be delivered in a few days. The extra time also let be add the ships boats, and dress the necks with a small lighthouse inside and Turk’s Head outside. The Photos below switch between either of the two final SIBS or the test piece, depending on the stage I was at when I remembered to photograph it. I’ll also add a bit more detail on the build. I used half round section styrene strip for the Wales, and painted them a dirty white, as was the hull below the waterline. The hull above the water line was painted black, keeping some of the minor overpaint onto the white as black marks, scuffs, etc to try and get a ‘working ship look’. The Windlass and the Dolly Winch were made from a combination of pieces of different diameter styrene tubes and rods. The ‘V’ shapes in the capstans were achieved by a bit of careful filing with some small files. The Dolly Winch was engine driven, and the Engine Cowl was made from a piece of basswood, and painted black. The Forward Companionway Hatch was carved from a piece of square wooden rod. The Cargo Hold Hatch was built by cutting a piece of basswood to near size, covering in thin sheet styrene to allow the Batons and Brackets (made from styrene) to be joined using liquid styrene glue. I made the Brackets from 1mm slices of ‘L’ section styrene, and the Baton from ½mm square section styrene. The ‘L’ slices were temporarily held on the tacky side of a Post-It, and the Baton glued in place. When dry, the bottoms of the ‘L’ sections were cut flush with the Baton. The Cargo Hatch Tarpaulin was made from a piece of paper kitchen towel stuck down with PVA glue coloured with a bit of acrylic paint. I was aiming for a faded olive green coloured Tarpaulin – I have to work on my colour mixing skills a bit more! I thought; ‘just mix green and black’, but after not achieving the correct shade, and consulting with artist daughter, apparently its mix orange and blue??!! However, this worked, and a nice shade of olive green obtained, although I deliberately made slightly different shades to get a weathered look. Once the PVA had dried, the bottom edge of the ‘Tarp’ was cut straight, and the Baton and Brackets glued on with the topside of the Baton level with the cut bottom edge of the ‘Tarp’. The Build method worked OK, although in future I’d undercoat using black before putting the ‘Tarp’ on. It took a lot of coats of paint before the white of the styrene stopped glowing through the paper towel. The Wheelhouse assembly was built by cutting and shaping a piece of basswood to near size, covering in thin sheet styrene to allow the doors and hatches (made from styrene) to be joined using liquid styrene glue. The Windows were formed in the Wheelhouse front by cutting out square holes in a piece of thin styrene sheet which was then painted brown, and the basswood was painted pale blue to (hopefully) look like glass. The painted styrene ‘front’ was then glued in position with the pale blue showing through the holes; similarly for the doors on the sides. The Skylight was printed on paper and stuck down on a piece of shaped and painted basswood which was then in turn stuck down. The Companionway Hatch and the Beading were formed from styrene. The Navigation Lights are pieces of electrical equipment wire insulation. The Bowsprit and Masts were made from cocktail sticks, I think the wood is beech, it’s certainly not bamboo. The bowsprit was attached with a spot of PVA and some black thread to represent gammoning. After establishing deck height on the masts I squared off their bottoms to enable them to be stepped in a piece of square section brass tubing glued below the decking so that the masts had a positive lock to prevent swivelling as the rigging was tautened. The Mast Bands were made from slices of styrene tube drilled out to the correct diameter and painted black, and the Boom Goose Necks were made from thin pieces of wire. The Gaff Yoke was carved from beech barbeque skewers, but I had a devil of a job getting the glue to stick these pieces to the Gaff. In a couple of cases I ended up using epoxy. I’m still trying to find out if the cocktail sticks are impregnated with preserver or something. The Mast Hoops were made from thin slices of styrene tube painted brown, although I did try John Fox III’s method of making brown paper tubes and cutting them into slices (shown elsewhere on the forum) because this is a very good representation of a varnished wooden hoop, but I found that they delaminated easily when attached to the sail with a bit of thread. Perhaps the brown paper I was using was not up to the task, or the CA was not holding, or just my technique. I’ll try it again in the future though. I used 80gm coloured craft paper for the Sails to give a buff coloured blotchy background for a weathered effect, the Sails’ outlines and the panel stitching were printed onto the paper. After the signatures were added, the Sails were cut out and the edges were reinforced and pierced. The Sails were then bent on to the Boom, Gaff and Mast Hoops, with the thread being reinforced by diluted PVA after knotting. The Staysails were bent onto a piece of thin brass rod just a little thicker than the thread used for the Standing Rigging, again the knots and the loops of thread being stiffened with diluted PVA. After the PVA set, the brass rod was removed, and the Stays themselves were then fed through the loops that this had formed I used black thread for the Standing Rigging and brown thread for the Running rigging. The Blocks at the mastheads are of the ‘thread loop’ variety, with running rigging fed through the loop. The Bob Stay was a short piece of thick black thread. The Ships Boat was made following John Fox III’s method of carving a mould, then moulding a hull blank using laminations of PVA soaked cigarette paper, and then using styrene rod for the ribs, and styrene sheet for the seats, coaming, etc. I’m going to wax the mould next time - it was a bit of fun getting the hull blanks off of it. The Sea was made from different colours of plasticene, shaped to show the waves and wind from the port quarter (hopefully), not much else to say about it, except that the dye in the modern incarnation of plasticene certainly stains things, including fingers. It actually took a little time to clean up the hull of the first SIB after rigging was complete to remove little smears of plasticene from its sides. I used a piece of tissue paper over the sea before putting anything in the bottle for the second SIB, and removed it after the rigging was complete, then attached the upper hull to the lower hull.
  5. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Going for Gold Build - Bessie

    To explain the deck recess, The hull blank was made from Ramin, a Far Eastern hardwood available in 2.2 m lengths in DIY stores at a reasonable price. It’s a pale cream colour, cuts and sands well and holds an edge. I used 4 pieces of square section with a 1mm strip cut on a small table saw between them for the centre line, keel, etc, all pinned with cocktail sticks. I think these are beech; they are definitely hard and I use them for the masts as well. I shaped the hull by taking the excess off using my Proxxon Mill/Drill unit (a present from me to me when the Euro was about 1.60 against the pound – I bought it from a German company - worked out at almost half the UK price) using a small router bit. Then used a combination of a round and square fine micro plane rasps -(http://www.axminster.co.uk/microplane-small-round-rasp-with-handle-951200?gclid=CPft-vqtmswCFbEy0wodSiINNA). These quickly remove wood (fingernails, skin and flesh as well) with little effort, and leave a smooth finish that requires only a little sanding. Photo of Microplanes I then marked out the bulwarks. I have a Proxxon router adapter, but the plate was too big for the curvature and for seeing the work, so I made an adapter plate out of some clear plastic so that I had a depth stop and used a smaller Proxxon drill to plunge route out the excess. Photo of router Hull with most waste removed I finished off by using a combination of small carving chisels inherited from my dad, scalpel blades held in dowel as a handle and sanding as required in conjunction with a depth gauge. I also used the half finished Cap Rail as a template for the deck recess I then shaped the Hull with the microplanes, small files and sanders. Then applied the bulwark stanchions (styrene strip) and painted white with just a hint of grey in it. For the deck planking, I cut strips 1mm wide from some light coloured veneer using a strip cutter I made a few years ago from a piece of aluminium right angle, nuts and bolts, and a single sided razor blade. Thickness of cut is set by using a drill bit as a gauge and a bit of trial and error. The only downside is that you need a straight edge on the veneer to start with and the cut strip is what the cutter is pressed against, but a bit of care and two or three light passes works ok. Photo of strip cutter Next was to use a black marker on one edge of the strips, cut them into 25mm lengths, blacken one end, and then lay them out temporarily on a flat surface using a glue stick; the type used for paper. I’ve found that this holds, but not permanently. The surface was sanded, this ensures a constant thickness, but also removes a lot of any ‘bleed’ from the marker pen, making the caulking look thinner. They were then stained a light oak colour, which is all I had. This is the practice model; Bessie had a teak deck according to the book ‘Whistling for a Wind’ (no drawings or photos – I was disappointed, but it’s a good read anyway) so I may get some teak stain and see how it looks. I then laid the deck in a 5 butt shift. It was a working vessel so I think a bit of unevenness in the caulking is acceptable. Then I added the Caprail All for now Best to all Alan
×
×
  • Create New...