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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/28/2020 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    I like to use colored Magic Markers as much as possible in my builds because they dry so fast and don't add additional thickness to the material like paint does. Here's a picture of how I'm painting the shields with the Magic Marker. This last picture shows all the 17 shields placed onto a noodle of clay and they will say here until I get ready to mount them on the sides of the hull. That's all for today. Regards Bruce
  2. 1 point
    joe100

    HMS Ramillies

    I thought I’d post a WIP thread of my 1/1500 scratch build project of HMS Ramillies. Typically I build the base and the ship separately but this time do the some issues I had with securing USS South Carolina to her base, I’ve completed Ramillies up to the main deck and joined the sea base and the ship together. This should be okay as the superstructure will mostly be built as a sub-assembly. The model is a little less than 5” long and made from boxwood. The camouflage scheme was used by Ramillies in the winter of 1917 into the spring of 1918. The sea base is carved wood as well and painted.
  3. 1 point
    joe100

    USS South Carolina, 125’ to 1”

    After about a month of work, my 1/1500 scale, fully scratch-built USS South Carolina model is finished. The model is entirely built from scratch. For more info, visit my website, www.josephlavender.com The hull and turrets are made from boxwood, the balance of the details are mostly brass, but I did use some styrene, and the funnels are turned brass. The decks were planked with basswood, mast rigging was made from tungsten wire. The ship’s boats are made from boxwood, brass, and stainless steel sheet. The ship is painted using Stynylrez black primer with Vallejo acrylic for both the color coat and top matte coat.
  4. 1 point
    joe100

    USS South Carolina, 125’ to 1”

    I carve all of my sea bases from wood. It’s tedious but that’s how McNarry did it, and how Philip Reed still does it. It’s the only way I’ve found that gives me the control I need
  5. 1 point
    joe100

    USS South Carolina, 125’ to 1”

    Thanks! Ive always avoided the lattice mast ships since it reduces the rigging, and that’s my favorite part. USS SC had much less than most from the era. If you take a look at my HMS Dreadnought I tried to add everything I could, but on SC I was reaching to find more things to model on her masts. Im working on HMS Ramillies in her 1917 pink, yellow, and blue camouflage and she’s a rigging paradise!
  6. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Tapering the yards

    Next picture. Once I get that taper where I want it I take the skewer out of the drill motor and I carefully trace the profile of that half of the yard I just tapered. That profile has to match up size for size so you may have to trace it a couple times till you get it right. Next picture. At this point I cut the skewer off at the overall length mark I made earlier from the print. Next pictures. Now here's the thing, at this point the diameter of my yard is too small to chuck up in my drill motor so I have to chuck the part up in a pin vice. If you don't have any of these then you gotta get some. Micro Mart sells them and most good hobby stores. Anyway you chuck up the yard so that the end you finished is inside and the end that isn't is on the outside.
  7. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Tapering the yards

    Hi Mick, If you are using a drill, chuck the yard just before the middle and sand, then reverse and repeat. I don't taper mine at small scale because I don't think its noticeable and the yard is then fragile. I've also found that using a drill to spin the yard can take too much off too quickly and it breaks, so I made a jig for hand sanding to finish to size. Its reasonably quick to use. See attachment. I use 'Masting and Rigging' by Robbert Kipping, my copy was printed in 1928 by 'The Technical Press, London' to give me an idea of sizes if the plan is a bit vague. This has tables that give dimensions for masts and yards for all types of ship, types of rig, eg schooner or square, tonnage, wood or steel, etc. It also gives sizes and types of rope and blocks. I've just checked online and its still being printed at a reasonable cost, and second hand copies (like mine) are still available. I've dug out an example: A ship of 500 tons, length 130 ft, breadth 30 ft. The given dimensions for the main yard are 57 ft long, not counting the arms,13.5 inches thick at the middle reducing to 9.5 inches at the 3rd quarter, ie 3/4 of the way between the middle and end. If you are doing them to a scale, eg; 1/250, then that comes down, for round figures, to slightly under 1/16 inch reducing to just over 1/32 inch at the 3rd quarter. Given this sort of scale thickness, I don't take them down to this because they would be very fragile, just to what looks reasonable without breaking, and very gently round over the ends. Once sails are on, unless really thick, then they will look fine, especially in the bottle. A tip is to drill any holes before sanding/or tapering because its a lot easier on thicker stock with less chance of splitting. If very thin after sanding, then you can strengthen them with CA glue or thinned acrylic varnish. When all is finished and rigged, the lack of a taper is not noticeable, and there is a lot less chance of a break when putting into the bottle. I only used it myself once, and used thin brass tube and rod for masts and yards on the Colvic Watson SIB to obtain scale size. I know this method is used on other ship models. Hope this helps you a bit Best Alan PS Just discovered it free as a download from Google Books Mast and Spar mast and spar jig.pdf
  8. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Tapering the yards

    Mick: It's not all that difficult to do but remember like most of our work there is a certain amount of touchy-feely that has to be employed as well as patients with yourself. This is the process that I use to make my yards. I'm sure it's not the only way to do it but it works pretty well for me. This first picture is a standard bamboo skewer that I have in my 3/8 drill motor. First I sand it to the diameter and overall length I want my yard to be. Next picture, Then I take the skewer out of the drill motor and lay it on my print where I mark it with a pencil at the center line and at the end of it's overall length. Next picture then I put the skewer back into the drill motor and I sand the taper I want on the end.
  9. 1 point
    joe100

    SMS Seeadler, 83’ to 1”

    My latest little creation, SMS Seeadler as she appeared early in her career in 1917. The model is made almost exclusively from boxwood and brass. The sails are a fine tissue paper that has been primed and painted, the rigging is several grades of tungsten wire. The sea base was made from carved basswood, then painted and sealed with epoxy resin.
  10. 1 point
    Shipbuilder

    Tiny deadeyes

    I made 33 of these this morning - too 36 minutes in total. Bob
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