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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/12/2020 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    DSiemens

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    All done. Added a little flair to make it fun.
  2. 6 points
    DSiemens

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    Well my initial thought didnt work. I painted in the bottom of the bulb but the paint just wouldnt dry. I let it sit all night and it dried a little but it probably woukd take two or three days. After discovering that the original bottle had clay I thought I may as well try. I have quiet a few bulbs so if I lose one its not a big deal. Well the clay worked perfectly. I kept it flat like it was and even painted the wave lines in the same way. The hardest part was that this bottle has a much smaller opening than the original. The sails would not fit in one piece. So I ended up cutting off the largest sails and glueing them back on in the bottle. It was tricky but I got it. Heres a photo of the ship now in the bottle. I think because the opening is so small the glue fumes werent able to get out and its fogged up the bottle. I'll have to spend some time cleaning it out. I wanted to use a white glue on this because I know white glue lasts a long time and doesn't fume. Problem is I needed to glue the sails in the right place and couldn't hold them there long enough for white glue t setso I used super glue since it dries fast but has fumes. You win some you lose some.
  3. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    John Fox 111: I get that about experimenting. Seems like I'm doing that a lot myself as my builds go along. I just found a way to simulate little blocks on my rigging by just tying a piece of black thread around the ends of the sheets and it looks pretty cool. On this build too, I decided to try using polystyrene on a few things .. Totally new material for me to be working with. But little by little I'm getting used to it's applications and limitations. At this point I have concluded that I need to be building ships that are five or so inches long. This little America, has been a real challenge for me because of it's tiny size. I literally made my anchors out of pieces of black thread. I don't want to build this small again. Fortunately I just found a glass artist that can blow me the bottles I need for these bigger ships I want to build. What a lucky break. An interesting side note is that I have a magnifying head set with four interchangeable lenses of increasing power that I'm wearing all the time on this build. I recently found myself in a situation of being stared at when at our local Kroger's supermarket store while shopping for dinner stuff. I forgot that the dam thing was on my head. HE HE!! Which by the way was comically compounded by the fact that I also went to the store wearing my slippers. Hysterical!! My youngest smart ass son, soon to be Dr. Foxworthy tells me that I am suffering from," Old Man Syndrome," and the only cure for me is to keep doing what I'm doing. Isn't that a hoot? Thanks for your input on my project. I appreciate it especially from the point of view that your work is so magnificent in my eyes and I hope to measure up to your prowess one of these days. Best regards Bruce
  4. 3 points
    This is the sea after a bit of shaping, I will paint it when it is dry enough in a day or 2.
  5. 3 points
    Well, she's ready for the bottle. Now I need to put the acrylic in the bottle, this is my way of doing it. MOV_0067.mp4
  6. 3 points
    DSiemens

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    Jeff - I'm actually thinking a painted sea with a card board base. Kind of like what I did with my old HMS Bounty build. You can see a build log on that here. https://www.folkartinbottles.com/workshop/building-the-hms-bounty/149-daniel-siemens-building-log It was quiet a while ago and not my best work. I should probably redo it. Similar concept though the boat would sit on the cardboard see and under it would be painted glass. Here's an example before the glass was painted. This is the technique I thought this bottle had followed before I got into the clay. It makes the ship in bottle very light weight in comparison to the clay sea method. The trickiest part will be painting the sea. I need to paint it right to the line where the cardboard sea will sit and not any further. I'm debating adding waves. The original was very flat. Problem is I could go on for days adding details but thats not what I'm after in a restoration. I need to keep it close to how it was originally built. So I may just leave it flat. As far as yards it does have them. They are glued directly to the paper and don't attach to the mast as the paper sail is glued to the mast. This is a classic manufacturing design. Very simplified and made to make a lot of these sibs very quickly. The hull would be placed in the base and the masts with sails intact would be glued to the hull one at a time inside the bottle. Then the ends of the forestays holding the jib are glued to the side of the bow sprit. Those fore stays are the only pieces of rigging on this ship and they only exist to hold sails. Once I have the sea done the rest of this build will be very fast.
  7. 1 point
    John Fox III

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    Greetings, I know all too well how super glue will cause fogging of the interior glass surface, sometimes months or years after the bottle/bulb is sealed. I finally found a method to keep that from happening. After the model is completed, I run a small aquarium air pump with a small hose down inside the bottle/bulb and keep it running 24 hours a day for seven days. Since I started doing this I have had zero problems with fogging caused by the super glue fumes. BTW epoxy glue can do the same thing, and since I normally use both and white glue at various stages in building almost any model, I do the airing out process on all of my models that go into sealed containers. Hope that helps someone! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  8. 1 point
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Thank you Jeff, I thought I posted this last photo, I didn't like the supplied bottle cap either, so I replaced it with a champagne cork. Cheers Mick
  9. 1 point
    Jeff B

    AMERICA

    Bruce, granted mine are more folk style,(It's good for a man to know his limitations), they often get squirrelly on me when I'm putting them in and I mess them up. I'll snag a line, cut a line on accident, snap a mast by too much tension, get sea on a sail or boom, the list goes on. I've pulled 2/3 of mine out, thus breaking them. Of course I've rebuilt them, vowing to not do that again, and be more careful. Sharing the bad allows experienced members to offer advice to help us next time. Alan showed me a launching tool. You showed me a way to hide my bow lines with the keel loop. Dan showed us to cut out a keel blank from the ocean b4 we go in. We learn from our mistakes by sharing them. As Dan said, don't be ashamed to share a mishap. We can offer our sympathy too.
  10. 1 point
    Jeff B

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    That sea is so flat, and it's going in a Christmas ornament (rubbing chin), a melted liquid sea be ideal? IT looks like there are NO wooden yards. The sharp curve in the sails appears to be from going into a Christmas tree ornament sideways. At first I was thinking that's a lot square sheets. But it's 4. Right number. Looking forward to the final product.
  11. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Hi Mick, Jeff, Mick, seems we had the same thoughts on the quality of the base and thanks for the info on the holder. Much appreciated. Jeff, as a picture is worth a 1000 words and is definitely better than my ‘sketch’ here are some phots show how I do things. Not the only way by any means, but may give you ideas. I’ve used a hull of a clipper that I am building to demonstrate, ignore the peg sticking out of the bottom, that's temporary for holding in a vice. The photos below show the brass staple in the stirrer stick. I drilled pilot holes in both the stick and the hull to ease the fit – there is still enough friction to hold. The photos below show the stick pinned to the hull. The recesses are for access to the rigging when the masts are fitted. I would cut away some of the stick to gain access to the forward one. I’ve also glued a length of thread to the stick and then tied it around the hull to help support it. Its easily cut away when required. The photo below shows the stick being removed by gently pushing a styrene rod shaped to a chisel point under the bow after the thread has been cut. I’m thinking about putting a dogleg in the styrene rod to make it a bit easier for access. The phot below show some of the tools I use. Top to bottom- Swab stick holder – a wooden skewer with some brass tube at each end (different angles) formed to hold a cotton swab. I use these with acetone to clean the inside of the bottle. Acetone removes plasticene (for the sea) and glue (both CA and PVA) that may have found its way onto the glass. I don’t think you are the only sibber to catch things when gluing up in the bottle. Brass wire – on a length of glass fibre. Used to push, pull, poke, lift etc. I’ve also used it to place small amounts of glue where required because the brass bends easily. Small brush – a small brush head glued to a length of brass mounted in a wooden skewer. I use this for touch up paints and glue (dilute PVA). The brass can be bent as required. Two glue applicators – the top one used for in the bottle. Its a sewing needle, bent as shown, mounted in a wooden skewer and with the head ground down to a ‘U’ shape to hold the glue. The one below is similar but straight and only about 6” long that I use outside the bottle. I’ve found that to reduce glue going astray in the bottle I have a ‘dry’ practice run to check that the applicator will reach where I want. I hold it horizontally with the ‘point’ towards me, and place the bend in the needle on the inside of the neck furthest from me as I (slowly) insert it. This helps keep it steady and the gluey point away from the sides. I’ve also tried using slips of paper to protect the control threads. If I do catch the side then a quick wipe with acetone gets rid of it before it dries – its quicker when its wet. Hope it helps Best for now Alan
  12. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Jeff, I've started this kit (raffle prize) but its on the back burner at present, so I've yet to try using the tool. It looks as if it may be useful, as long as it doesn't slip. What intrigued me more than anything was that some bits of the kit are what I would class as cheaply done, e.g; the stand supplied for the ship shown in the photo above is MDF and could easily, and far more pleasing, to have been hardwood. I have replaced it with oak. However, the tool supplied is made from a very nice piece of hardwood and brass rod and is disposable assuming the kit is a once only build. I've had the same problems holding the SIB once in the bottle. When I did the Colvic Watson, (see build logs) I stole and amended a method that John Fox III showed a few weeks ago. No photos unfortunately, but an electronic sketch is shown, I used 3 wooden coffee stirrers, slotted and CA glued as shown to follow the curve of the bottle. The SIB had two small pegs as shown (black) which passed through holes in the stirrer. These turned out to be a bit loose so I secured the hull by using a staple made from 0.5 mm brass rod, the points being sharp and just long enough to grip. Realistically, there is not a lot of weight to worry about. I had to re-enforce the stirrer joints with more glue a couple of times when it let go - I still think these are impregnated with something that affects the 'stick'. The supporting stick was cut away where necessary to accommodate the control strings. Anyway, it actually worked well during launch, allowing masts etc to be positioned, glued and so on. When all was done, I released the SIB by gently levering out the staple with a length of plastic rod formed into a chisel point, then glued the SIB into the sea recess. Lots of room for improvement, but I'm certainly going to use this method again. Best for now Alan
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