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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/20/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    A few months ago, I wanted to do another ship but knew I had unfinished business. I glued the wrecked ship to a mount, stripped everything off, re-glued the broken bowsprit, and totally re-rigged the ship. This time I put the main and fore masts on long wire hinges that would clear the cabin and other deck furniture. I still had the problem of a ship slightly too large for a regular whiskey bottle opening. I searched in vain for a few weeks on line and in stores for a corked bottle with a wider neck with no luck. I finally settled for a cheap jug wine bottle (Gallo or something like that?). It had a screw top, which i hated, and the quality of the glass was not great, but I went with it anyway. I used Plasticine clay for the sea, mixing grey, green and blue in varying amounts to give it a slightly uneven color and white clay for whitecaps. I glued two blocks to the glass using Aleen's multi-surface adhesive that I purchased at Michael's craft store. Dried quickly and held fast! Because i no longer had to have the standing rigging mobile, I glued all the shrouds and stays into their respective holes and cut them underneath the hull where they emerged while outside the bottle. I went from something like 67 threads I had to manage down to around 23 or 24 After 2 or 3 weeks' work, ready to launch again I glued the ship to the 2 blocks and built up the sea around the hull. I glued the running rigging in place where it left the foremost yard arm. I used a broken bit of razor blade glued to a wooden dowel and used that to cut off the thread. I unfortunately broke a few threads in the wrong place trying to cut them and had to try to glue 2 ends of a broken thread together while in the bottle and eventually got them so it didn't look two bad...one advantage of a wavy glass bottle. I finally got the process down to slice the threads without ruining the model...I made three different slicing tools with razor blades at different angle and used a sawing motion against the thread, and eventually it cut through cleanly and gently. And finally, I covered up the ugly metal screw cap with sealing wax I bought at Michael's, melted in a double boiler. Inspired by those Maker's Mark commercials And that's it. Not museum quality, but nice enough for the mantle after I build a stand. And I can rest easy at night and start planning my next project! thanks for reading along and all the encouraging comments. Paul (Taz)
  2. 2 points
    All done for today. Mast are on.
  3. 2 points
    DSiemens

    War Gaming Miniature Models

    I should get back to this build some day.....lol. I've been meaning to build more of these. Our game has progressed into full blown D&D with occasional miniature naval combat. My boys are such good and creative players. It's been a lot of fun.
  4. 1 point
    Tazam0827: Great recovery! I think a lot of times putting something away for a while helps a great deal as things come to you after a while and then you can move forward. I like the bottle too and the sealing wax looks just fine. regards Bruce
  5. 1 point
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    Jeff, I wanted to build a ship A) that had an interesting story and history, B) that I could find detailed diagrams of, C) was a three-masted square rigger. I thought it was cool that it was the first to discover and circumnavigate the Antarctic. I originally planned on building an ice shelf or iceberg into the surrounding sea, and in the first bottle I actually had a few quartz stones embedded to simulate sea ice, but I never followed through with that in the second bottle.
  6. 1 point
    I told my wife this hobby wouldn't hobby wouldn't cost any money. I would use every day materials found around the house. Haha. At one time I was a "sailor." Now I'm just "old salt." I can assure you- there's no time onboard a ship (at sea) to make ships in bottles. BR Jeff
  7. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    "Broke the bottle" - been there and its not a nice feeling. Superb recovery though and the bottle looks good. I've done a couple SIBs with the masts going in separately. (one at present which I'll upload in the near future). First attempt ended in the bottle break. For the second attempt I put the masts in first placing the bottoms in holes drilled in a piece of wood at the back of the bottle pressed into the sea (Plasticine - can be reshaped afterwards). This requires the threads to have enough length for working. It also meant that they were not doubled up passing through the neck. Then put the hull in drawing up slack as I went. I also used a control thread from the bottom of the masts through the hull to help pull them into place once the hull was in. This thread also has the effect of helping stop the bottom of the mast looping around others and if it does its easier to untangle. The other thing I do with threads is follow a tip I picked up from a book, I can't remember who by, where I draw a deck outline on a piece of card and then stab a pin hole through where the control thread goes through the deck. I then feed the free ends of the control threads through their respective holes. It keeps them neat, untangled, on the SIB side at least, and I don't have to search for the one I wish to adjust. The card is fixed to a suitable point in front of the bottle when launching. I've also found that cutting the threads is trickier than it sounds. Has anyone out there actually built and used the hot wire thread cutter that there are plans for in various SIB books and magazines? It would be interesting to know. Best Alan
  8. 1 point
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    Now to launch the ship. Mizzen mast folded down.... Main and Fore masts separated totally from the hull... Hull goes in first...oh oh.... Followed by the other two masts.....I suspect at this point I'm doomed And disaster. A total tangle. After and hour or two tring to untangle my mess, I gave up. Dejected, I broke the bottle with a hammer, put the shipwreck in a box and put it on the shelf for a year and tried to avoid thinking about it
  9. 1 point
    DSiemens

    War Gaming Miniature Models

    My brother in law got a 3D printer and asked if I wanted anything. Well...ships of coarse. So I dug around and found these. https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2153911 I've dabbled with naval wargaming for a while. I got really into the Pirates constructible card game when it was out and still have all my ships. My wife's not really into it so I turned to my only other source of players. My five and eight year old boys. They are eager players but have short attention spans so playing the "regular" rules doesn't work. So I made up some rules that work for them and we've been on many an hours long adventures that are fun for every one. If any ones interested I'll post the rules. Any way thats a long story for what I'm working on. While I like the old contructible ships I really like more realistic looking models. So I got the skills why not make them. I built a 1:1200 Queen Anne's Revenge a while ago and had fun with it. Now I'm testing out the 3D printed hulls and seeing what I can do with them. Heres some photos. One thing I have found painting the plastic is I have a lack of good paint. Can any one sugest types and colors?
  10. 1 point
    I just put a white thread along the hull in the gouge I cut above the waterline. No photo. J.
  11. 1 point
    DSiemens

    War Gaming Miniature Models

    I almost forgot I got a lot done on my HMS Revenge. We've actually run it through a few games. Its my boys pirate ship at this point thus the black pennants. Those are removeable though. As far as printing in finer scale it depends in the quality of the printer. I have had cannons printed that about 2 mm long and they are pretty good. They were printed on a $20,000 printer though.
  12. 1 point
    DSiemens

    War Gaming Miniature Models

    Thanks Alan. A lot of useful information in there. I looked at Games Workshop paint and stumbled across a thread debating whether more expensive paints really were as good as the less expensive hobby paints. This made me think and I thought for as in expensive as some of the paints can be it was worth a try. I picked up some Apple Barrel brand paint for $2 a bottle and painted a diecast HMS Revenge. I think its 1/600 scale. This was my result. I'm actually pretty pleased with it. It does make me wonder what is the difference between the less expensive amd more expensive paint? Is it just marketing? Who knows, just glad I could find an affordable option. Work on the other ship continues. The game I play with my boys is more pirate based so I decided to change the bowsprit to a spirit sail. This is more fitting for 18th century. Given the hull is Napoleanic, for a game its fine.
  13. 1 point
    exwafoo

    War Gaming Miniature Models

    Dan, This link has lots of discussion points on paints. http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/tools_techniques_and_reference_materials/f/18.aspx I tend to use the Acrylics from Games Workshop. You have to choose by the colour shown as the names are not realy usefull, eg, 'snot green'!!?? They are water soluble, give a good coverage and are non toxic so you can point the brush in the time honoured fashion by licking it without worry. More to the point if small hands are touching them then this is a benefit. The other thing is, in the UK at least, you could get free painting lessons in the shop itself. I learned when I took my son when he was younger. He was underage then so could not be left on his own either to wargame or have painting lessons. I didn't play, but did get involved in the painting. The tips I would pass on, a good brush degrease the plastic hull in detergent (dish washing stuff does) rinse thin the paint ( I use acrilyc thinners for this, but water does the job) several thin coats are much better than 1 thick rinse the brush in water there are acrylic undercoats if needed. Games Workshop usually used a spray can of black to undercoat everything. It worked well. Have a look at http://www.rodlangton.com/index-2.html for 1/1200 wargaming ships. There are a set of rules. Alan
  14. 1 point
    Artur

    Western River

    I came back from the European Championship Naviga C. My Western River won the gold medal. Artur
  15. 1 point
    Artur

    Western River

    I won the gold medal in qualifying for the European Championship in Bulgaria. Pozdrawiam Artur
  16. 1 point
    Jesse, Hang in there. We hope you get feeling better soon. Gwyl
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