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  1. 9 points
    tazam0827

    Asgard

    It occurred to me that I never finished this build log. Didn't want to leave you all hanging. I'm sure you were on the edge of your seat! I wasn't super happy with the results. But in the interest of sharing our disappointments as well as our triumphs, here it is. I should have spent more time smoothing the hull after I made some design changes, The proportion of the masts wasn't quite right and I think I should have included the topsails. Also, if you're going to make your ship heel, make sure it heels towards the front of the bottle. Otherwise it hides a lot of the deck features and makes it less interesting. On the plus side, I like the way the lighthouse on the bluff looks, and I finally figured out a Turk's Head knot!
  2. 8 points
    John Fox III

    Paper Mache Hulls

    Greetings All, I had the idea of taking a method for making ship's boats I developed and testing whether it might work for much larger hulls. It was all experimental, so I wasn't taking photos as I worked, but since the idea worked out well I redid all the work covering it with photos to show how. Some of you may have seen my work with ship's boat hulls being made by using a plug of the hull shape, covering that plug with cigarette papers whetted with diluted white (pva} glue. Believe I have a video showing how this is done on Vimeo, do not have the URL for that but you can look it up on their site. Basically, laying the whetted paper over the plug, then using a wet toothpick to smooth it down tight to the entire plug, folding the paper over at bow and stern. After waiting 24 hours for the glue to dry/harden, adding another layer. For most ship's boats I would do 4 layers of paper. I would then cover the paper with either cyanoacrylate glue or varnish to harden it. Excess paper was cut away at the top of the bulwarks, and then the paper hull was popped off of the plug. The biggest problem with repeating for more than a single boat of the same shape and size was that cutting the excess paper sometimes cut the plug top, so I added a piece of shim brass of .005" thick to the top of the plug. Photos below show some views of this work, including finishing the interior of the boats with thin wood or plastic pieces. In some cases I used 0.015" thick maple veneer to plank the outside of the boats. These boats ranged from 1/2" to 1-1/4" long. More to follow in subsequent posts.
  3. 8 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    Working out the bow (prow?) section and how to get it through bottle neck without problems.
  4. 8 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    Slowly building her up, scuppers, more planking. I have been playing with this for a couple weeks and this is the point I am at currently.
  5. 8 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    I've been able to work on my Viking ship the last few days. With all this staying home now, I think I'll start moveing along better in the coming week. Here are some pics of where she's at presently. Stay safe guys and gals.
  6. 7 points
    John Fox III

    Paper Mache Hulls

    Greetings All, As the paper hull work continues I've made up a keel piece that includes the slot for the drop keel. It was assembled from pieces of 1/32" thick maple veneer that was hand sanded down to 0.020" thick, then glued together as shown. The cutout to match the keel area of the paper hull was then made, and the keel glued to the paper hull itself. Additionally I added a 1/16" thick cedar stern face to the back of the paper hull, it is intentionally made thicker than needed, and will be sanded down to 1/16" later in the work. I then took the same maple veneer sanded down to 0.012"-0.015" thick and cut it into 1/32" wide strips. These were then glued to the hull, starting with two planks at the top of bulwarks and two along the keel, to both sides of the hull. I used cyanoacrylate glue to glue each plank to the paper and the next plank added. I then added two more to each location, and repeated until the hull was completely planked over. At this point the planks are not even and smooth, slight variations in their thickness, so I then sanded the planking even and smooth. I should mention that this planking method is not "normal" in it's method, my only intention was to strengthen the paper hull. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  7. 7 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    She's ready. Took some photographs outside in the natural light. Painted the knot red but then got inspired to make a red,white and blue theme with stars on the stopper. The anchor with a line under it on the bottle top, is a nod to the Davenport crockery found at the wreak site. Hope you like it.
  8. 7 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    Things are moving along quite well, boats ready, bottles ready, I'm not😂 And there will be a surprise in store! As its a kraken bottle! It's going to be a tight squeeze! 😂
  9. 7 points
    Lubber123

    Authenic Models Privateer

    Finally got back to the AM Privateer kit. I find the most interesting part of the kit to be the nice "Dutch Flask" bottle and stand so this build is more a "bottle with a ship in it" then a "ship built into a bottle". The ship is a generic brig with no real historical content but some of the materials are nice, especially the hull and a nice set of sail materials. The spool of thread included with the kit is useless but the bamboo cocktail skewer material for the mast and spars sanded down nicely. Of course the putty for the sea is too hardened to be of use. I had to fair out the stand to fit the form of the bottle better. I first gave the stand a coat of wood conditioner and a light coat of clear stain but then I decided to give it a deeper antiqued look with some dark walnut stain. I also glued the wooded stopper ornament to a cork to make a better stopper for the neck. I have all the mast and spars shaped and assembled. The plans don't call for stepped mast so I didn't step them. However the rigging plan is a little skimpy and out of experience I know that the erection in the bottle might be difficult without stabilizing mast shrouds and backstays so I included them. I just "eyeballed" their placement. I also intent to put stays on the yardarms so I can get them aligned properly in the bottle. The sail material is stiff enough to hold a curve in the sails and I didn't think to shape them until I had glued them in place. The instructions don't call this out but I was still able to shape them after they were mounted. Also, don't throw away the small scraps of trimmings from the cut away sails. I used some to make small pendants and I can use them on other models also. So at this point I'm going to use my own construction instinct instead of trying to follow the instructions. At least the booklet has a scaled plan for the hull, masts and spars and is an interesting read even if the rigging is skimpy. I realize that this is suppose to be a beginner level kit but skimpy rigging can cause more problems then it presents. It isn't hard to improve it. I've got the foremast erected on the rigging jig and the other masts are hinged in place and collapsed behind waiting to be rigged upright. She'll be out of dry dock before too long.
  10. 7 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All. Above the water-line is planked, the bulwarks are on, I wanted to plank below the water line, but it wouldn't happen! So it's painted, with "white stuff". The gunwales (capping rails?)are next, followed by the transom, and then the deck furniture, cannons, wheel, capstan, jolly-boat,anchors,other stuff. And masts etc. The list goes on and on.... Cheers Mick
  11. 6 points
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    I must apologize for my inactivity. Between change management at work, taking care of my aging mother, and now COVID-19, things are a bit hairy these days. Anyway some progress as follows:
  12. 6 points
    I began this tread under the title "Cheap-O Plank on Frame Brig" hoping that someone might help me identify exactly what this kit might be. Well I figured it out by researching riggings for sloops, which led me to schooners which led me to Baltimore Clippers which led me to the Harvey (The Pride of Baltimore is a different ship) which has the exact deck plan as this model. True to modern day fashion, there is a You Tube Video of someone who experienced exactly my same plight and bought one of these kits and then figured it out. Of course by now I have made various blunders trying to do things the way I thought they should be done since I didn't really have much for instructions. I gave her a coat of paint, which hides a lot of sins but the paint scheme is more 1747 instead of 1847 ( I needed a lot of oakum and tallow on the hull). I have to say the quality control on the kit is lax; many of the parts that were suppose to mate don't, A few parts are missing, some parts I don't know what they are for but that became fewer as I pieced together the deck furniture and I can figure out where some of the left over parts go. The sail plan doesn't include the square sails on the main mast and I had to research the lengths of the masts, yards, booms and gaffs which I found. Apparently there are more accessories that I can buy that include brass cannons and belaying pins but I don't see any blocks or deadeyes available. Since this is a SIB site I won't bore the audience with the rest of the build. I may post a final picture when I finish. But the Harvey is an interesting ship, actually it was a merchant ship outfitted with guns for protection against pirates which were then still numerous. She sailed the California coast around the days of the Gold Rush so she may have had precious cargo. I was defiantly more "intellectually engaged' trying to solve this puzzle then if I had a kit that was well planned and easier to assemble - but I won't end up with a museum piece, which would have been unlikely in any case! Experience is the only way to grow.
  13. 6 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    Working out some deck rails.
  14. 6 points
    Lubber123

    Cheap-O Plank on Frame Brig Kit

    After a fashion I managed to plank the hull, which wasn't an easy task without a sheer line plan. Also the ribs on the bulkheads weren't quite precise and I had no plan to fair them up to. The transom didn't make much sense to me and I was sure I was missing a part for it so I ended up fashioning a piece and had to change the lines of the hull somewhat. It worked better on the starboard side than on the port side. I don't think the model would win any prizes if closely examined by experts but then again it isn't a "museum quality" model kit; it's another generic "Privateer" - a merchant ship that was converted for military use. I assembled all the various deck furnishings and ended up with extra pieces I can't identify, one of which I think was the transom piece I was looking for, I think. I loosely placed some of the deck furnishings for the photo. I think the cannons look a little hokey and I can't quite decide to include them or not. I may liven up the carriages for them by painting them red, which I've seen on historically restored cannons. Next step is painting the hull then trying to figure out the masts and rigging. I have no dimensions for the masts and spars but was provided with a actual scale sail plan that I can back- solve from.
  15. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Funnel with smoke in place together with the bridge. Foremast fixed and rigging tied down. Just the bowsprit left and she's ready to be corked.
  16. 6 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    How to get that shape in there? This has busted my brain a little, but I am going to go with a split deck in addition to the hull. Perhaps I am a glutton for punishment.
  17. 6 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    I have not had much luck with split hulls so far, nor Galleon type ships because of their inherent shape. Being hard headed, and becoming more patient with each build, it has become a personal challenge to get a split hull properly in there.
  18. 6 points
    John Fox III

    Paper Mache Hulls

    Greetings All, The next installment of my paper mache hull project is for a much larger hull. This particular hull is for a sandbagger, roughly 3 times larger than any of the ship's boat hulls I've done in the past, at 3-3/4" long and 1-1/2" wide. The plug was made from basswood, cut to. vertical cross sections spaced at 2' to the 1/8" scale. The wood was carved to shape using templates, then sanded and sealed multiple times to get it smooth and water tight. The first hull I used cigarette papers, but that turned out to be problematic as it took many papers to cover the hull, with lots of overlapping. The second time I decided to use tissue paper, the kind one often finds in gifts and such. It was white, but I used some brown wiping stain to get a color that looked more wood like, as at least some areas of the interior of the hull would be visible on the final model. I used 4 layers of paper, letting it dry for 24 hours between layers. The excess was cut off at the top of bulwarks after each 2 layers, and finally the hull was sanded to smooth out the overlaps at stern and bow. Lastly I put several coats of varnish on the paper hull, sanding lightly in between, to harden the outer surface of the hull. Most to follow. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  19. 6 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    The KRAKEN 😲😲 needs a few things to finish off I.e Cork and stand but happy I managed to pull it off. 😁
  20. 6 points
    Lubber123

    Authenic Models Privateer

    I finished rigging my "Privateer" and she looked very ship-shape on the rigging stand. I prepared my putty sea using plumber's putty that I had colored with oil paints. I had some left over from about a year ago which was just the right consistency. I tried not to over do the sea and used uncolored putty for the white foam. Next was setting her to "sea". I found I had a very tight fit and probably should have trimmed the hull just a bit thinner. I found this to be a general issue with most of the parts in the kit that they all needed some trimming down or fairing out. The bottle didn't quite fit the stand correctly so the stand needed to be shaped down before I epoxied the bottle to it. The inside of the cap would have needed to be thinned out in order to fit over the bottle treads but I just glued a cork stopper into it to make it removable. All didn't go very smoothly. I ripped a sail on the main mast off off its yardarm during insertion. The sail material is a stiff fabric which allows the sails to be shaped nicely before insertion but holds a crease and I ended up creasing the spanker sail with no hope of reshaping it. The model ended up a bit more "wind blown" then I would have liked and took some damage during insertion but I finished her off anyway with a decorative knot on the neck using the provided yarn. I have had better luck with models I made from scratch using my own materials and plans. I suppose the down fall of kit construction is not knowing what shapes are reliable and not having any previous experience with the provided materials so one doesn't know how they will behave. The beginner has to trust that all the materials in the kit have been proven and tested, which may be a naïve assumption. So for a kit that was suppose to be "beginner level", this wasn't some "snap the pieces together and be done" affair and requires a bit of sophistication. I always learn something every time I build a kit or follow a build from a book which allows me the knowledge to do my own scratch builds. I have a good collection of kits so I'll post more when I build them.
  21. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Okay,time to glue the hull in place. Which epoxy;60 minutes or the five minutes setting time? Yeah you probably guessed it, 5 minutes for me; I want things done quickly!Just got to make sure that its in the right place;quite a hot chemical reaction is felt through the glass! After its set I add the plastasine in two seperate pieces through the neck of the bottle. Even with dried wood glue on the top which gives the sea a nice gloss ,it dosen't crack,in fact its actually a bit rubbery. Then I continue to tamp the modelled sea down all around the hul especially at the stern because after I fix the stern piece on, its gonna be virtually impossible to reach that area without damaging something.Next stage will be to glue the stern in place.I will only be able to have one shot at it!
  22. 6 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All. I've done the hand-rails,(Gunnels?, Capping rails?, Bannisters?, Not sure of the correct terminology.) Made from polyester thread, wiped with super-glue (CA), then wiped with a rag. Makes the thread quite rigid. Then glued with CA. The canons aren't loaded yet, but they are made from styrene. Cheers Mick
  23. 6 points
    exwafoo

    Swap Head tool

    Hi All, I mentioned in the build log 'Miniature Clipper' that I had made a rigging stand from Circuit Board Stand Offs or Spacers. I've been asked to elaborate what I meant by these. So here goes. These are a plastic spacers used to securely mount electrical circuit boards in an enclosure, ensuring that they are insulated from the case (if its metal) and to allow cooling air to circulate. They cost me about £2 on the web, and came in a nice compartmentalised box. This shows the pieces included. I think the thread is M3. Its a hard plastic, probably nylon. I got these originally to make a tool with swapable heads for cleaning the inside of a bottle and applying varnish on the sea. I only wanted to make one tool to suit different sizes of bottle. It ended up as shown below. Lengths of dowel, with the top being able to slide forward to work the hinge. The hinge was made from one of the plastic pieces by cutting and shaping as required to fit a flange formed on the end of the thicker dowel. A length of brass rod was used to make the hinge pins and the connecting rod.The brush was cut from the shaft and attached to one of the smaller threaded pieces with epoxy putty. Keeping it straight allows entry into the bottle without touching the sides, then the head can be swivelled to suit by sliding the top dowel forward. I filled notches in it to give a bit of grip. With the addition of extra spacers, then all corners of a large bottle can be reached. Smaller brush heads can be attached if required. The rigging stand was made by drilling a clearance hole in a piece so it could be screwed to the vertical section forming a right angle, and another had a piece chopped out to allow a small screw to be used to fix the SIB in place. There is enough friction to allow adjustment of the SIB in a couple of directions to enable working on. Rigging Stand shown below
  24. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    The inside view of the starboard side looks as though its not sitting flush because that is the area I had to cut away a bit more material but it is flush on the outside of the hull where it matters. Last photo is the two sides mated and glued together with white wood glue. When that fully dries I will glue the completed hull to the glass.
  25. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Nah,didn't want to do that;its the piece that supports the main mast. In the end I just closed my eyes and pushed it in. As luck would have it, just one of the davits came off and was actually pretty easy to glue back on.Had to do a bit of touch up painting on it.
  26. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Starboard side.Bottom piece of the hull goes in no problem but the top half with those davits and lifeboat is.Somethings going to have to give😰
  27. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Bruce: just like to add that the twine,string,rope or whatever you use for your Turks head needs to be quite long; maybe up to two meters long. Better to have too much than not enough.
  28. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    There is no way the hull is going to go through the bottle neck with the lifeboats protruding so much, so I have had to cut away more of the hull down the centre line to stand a chance of getting her in!
  29. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Just remembered to make some 0,3mm metal loops for tying some of the rigging too. Snip the ends off as short as possible under the deck and superglue. After the glue has dried sufficently I sand it down as much as I dare so when it is fitted back on to the main hull the decking will be hopefully fairly flat.
  30. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Glued the sails in place. Managed to get a nice shot of her in the morning sunlight. Bridge structure completed as well as all the deck items that I'm going to use,so I guess she's about ready for her new berth.
  31. 5 points
    James w rogers

    San paolo 1743 xambekk malta.

    Back to it after a bit of a break. Anyway, hope you're all OK? Given the current situation. Finally tackled the job I've been putting for ages as I was hoping to find something for the overhanging grated deck, but alas nothing suitable came about, so I'm having to try and make it from scratch with a very small drill bit in my dremel. Not going to look to scale but hopefully won't stand out to much! The Hull, so far, is already cut in half and dowelled and sitting on its locating plug which will be set into the sea.
  32. 5 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All. A bit more progress! The Main and Mizzen are now on deck, at the moment just sitting there. I think I'll do the lower shrouds at a later date, mainly so they don't get damaged, and more importantly, they don't get tangled! I've put the sheets on the gaff sail, and they are becoming a nightmare, so those bits and pieces of thread which will end up hanging out of the bottle come launching time will be sorted out later. Still a bit more to do! Cheers, and stay safe. Mick
  33. 5 points
    While I was searching eBay for SIB kits, I came across this plank-on-frame brig kit for sale for $15 (USD). It is a made-in-China set of laser cut wood parts, not too much different from my Model Shipways plank-on-frame 18th Century Long Boat kit except my MS kit had an excellent instruction booklet and well labeled parts. In typical made-in-China cheap-o fashion, this kit has a double sided sheet of a poorly labeled diagram for construction instructions, some of the parts aren't labeled, there is no (English) alphabetic order to the sequence of construction, or a color photo of what the final build should look like. So of the parts I have no idea what they are suppose to be and it took me about two hours to figure out which part was the transom. But, I've spent a lot more money for a lot less entertainment. Since I have some plank-on-frame experience and a copy of Charles G. Davis' "The Built Up Ship Model" which features the build of the brig-of-was USS Lexington, which this model kind of resembles, I may as well have some fun trying to make something of this. I don't suggest a kit like this for someone who doesn't know how to bend a plank to make a planked up hull and there are no instructions on how to paint the model, or make the sails or even how to rig it so beginners steer clear. -do=add#.url -do=add#.url -do=add#.url -do=add#.url -do=add#.url -do=add#.url -do=add#.url
  34. 5 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    A little planking, cannon ports cut out.
  35. 5 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    I found a cool apothecary bottle that is pretty clean and clear that I think will work nicely.
  36. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

  37. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

  38. 5 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Main mast in place. Giving all the masts a small tilt/rake backwards as I believe she had them that way. Behind the main mast is the skylight to the boiler room.Soon we will have steam power!
  39. 5 points
    Jeff B

    USS Permit (SSN- 594)

    1963-1993 While other teenagers were driving cars... I was driving a multimillion dollar state of the art master of seas. Loved it so much, I begged the Skipper for reenlistment and to let me do another "hitch" on her rather than go to shore duty. Being fully aware ware of the dimensions, as I've walked them many times, and was quizzed to pass ships submarine quals, it's to scale. Couldn't get the rudder fin in. She's maximum knots, it's buried in foam. She had just came out the shipyard and was refitted with sound dampening rubber on all noise making machinery, and a new reactor core. She was the fastest and quietest of her class. The next class was faster, but the Permit was still quieter. "First to fire" the Mark 48 torpedo and the Subroc. The rest is classified. Got the idea from Dan.
  40. 5 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    In my haste to start putting her in the bottle I forgot to take a picture of all the components(pieces)that go to making her up. Oh well! Start with the port side because I know it fits alright because it's narrower than the starboard side. Pieces fit together well and I'm not even going to glue them because the rest of the hull and decking will hold it all together when they are glued.(I hope).
  41. 5 points
    James w rogers

    1st miniature sib

    A bit of rigging, and sail making. 😁
  42. 5 points
    exwafoo

    Miniature Clipper Ship

    Hi All, Father Christmas very kindly left me a selection of Rum Miniatures. The bottles were of 4 cl volume and a flat design of approx size 4.5 cm w x 2.3 cm d x 12 cm h. Besides enjoying the contents, I thought that a first attempt at a miniature might be fun. The internal size allowed for a SIB of approx 5 cm l x 3.5 cm h. I decided on using the plans for a 3 mast clipper in Making Ships in Bottles by Leon Labistour. I scanned and shrunk the plan until I got a size to fit the bottle. Using the scan, I overlaid the sails with stitching lines and printed planking lines on the hull outline, then printed out on lightweight white airmail paper. I used a selection of different weights of line and colour coupled with some different colours of water paints to colour the sails and planking, then chose what I thought looked best. The hull was carved from a piece of Ramin square stock (its a tropical hardwood, comes in 2 metre lengths at the local DIY store) in the time honoured way of sticking the printed outline to the wood and cutting it to shape. I cut out the deck well and used 0.5 mm styrene for the bulwarks. Masking and painting with acrylics was a bit of a fiddle, but got there in the end. I’ve got some nice thin masking tape, but the adhesive was drying out so got a bit of edge creep that really shows up in the photos. Time for a shopping trip. 😁 I then cut out the printed planking and glued it in place. I’ve been following other Sibbers who do miniatures, and reading various articles in books, etc. It seems that its best to cut out the sails in one piece by the mast, then apply the yards which should be made from brush bristles to allow them to flex during launch. Cutting out with a sharp blade was no issue, but sticking the bristles down proved a bit of a problem. I used bristles off of an unused wallpaper paste brush and I think they must have a Teflon coating or similar. Superglue didn’t work well, so I tried PVA. They still popped off. I used the acrylic B72, but the acetone in this melted the plastic. In the end several coats of PVA encapsulating the yard seemed to work. Next time I’ll use natural bristles. You can see one missing in the photo (later replaced). I trimmed them to length after sticking them on. For the staysails, I realised that attaching them to the rigging on the SIB was going to be fiddly to say the least, so I threaded a length of thread (I used fly tying thread) through the printed paper. There was enough friction to hold it tight, then I glued it on to the length of the sail. Once dry, I carefully cut out the sail and added more glue. This worked, I only had to reglue a couple of sail ends. I made the masts from slivers of bamboo kebab sticks, sanded down to a reasonable thickness. Just one piece each, no attempt at any tops. Then stuck them to the back of the sails. No problems with this at all. I used plasticine for the sea and suddenly found the need for some new, thinner tools to put it in the bottle. A length of thin stainless steel rod, origin unknown, found in my garage was pressed into service. The height of the sea, hull and a fake mast were then checked for clearance with the top of the bottle as shown below. I had also by this stage drilled the appropriate holes for the rigging in the hull. I used a styrene template to get the spacing even. The masts are hinged using a length of thread from the bottom of the mast through a hole in the hull – the hinge-less method described in the book. It allows the masts to fold easily and be pulled back into place during bottling. I then started to rig the SIB. It became rapidly obvious that working at desk height was no use, so I made a small working top about 6 inches square that fitted on my vice. This allowed me to rest my hands about chin level. It also became obvious that holding the SIB by hand was inviting damage to the sails and yards so I made a small rigging jig from some plastic circuit board stand-offs. These are about £2 for a box full of different lengths of hexagonal plastic ‘bits’ that screw together as required. I fixed it to the small worktop as shown. There is enough friction in the plastic fittings to allow swivel and rotation with ease. Check fold before launch, below. Ready for launch below, only the two deck houses to be glued in place. Launched, below. A bit of plasticine turned out not to be enough to hold the bottle during glue up, so a bottle clamp had to made. Plywood cut as shown below, hinged and lined with a bit of old leather. Held under tension by a rubber band, and screwed to the small vice top. Works well. Bottle in the new clamp below.. I made the stand from a piece of MDF covered with a photocopy of an old map illustration, and then sprayed with acrylic varnish. The supports are thin plywood stained with a wood scratch repair felt tip pen. Self adhesive felt pads underneath. There was one other thing that I tried that doesn’t really show on the photos. The external finish on the bottle was ‘lumpy’, not really unexpected considering their source. Before I retired I used to work with a couple of guys who were into model aircraft kit builds. They produced some really nice work. I remembered them bemoaning the fact that a certain brand of acrylic floor polish was no longer obtainable as they used it to dip the cockpit canopies in before assembly which apparently improved the clarity wonderfully. So I put the bottle on a stick and sprayed it with a couple of coats of acrylic varnish. It improved the finish and clarity quite well. Worth doing. The finished SIB below. Still thinking about a Turks Head.
  43. 5 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    I would recommend making the one on the left hand side that has six screws on either side and offset numbering 1-6. This will give you a turks head with up to at least three weaves as per the one in my own picture. Diameter of the wood of course depends on your bottle neck size but the turks head can be adjusted for size after you've completed it. I would say perhaps the diameter of a broom handle and maybe around two and a half inches long will be sufficent. Hope this helps.
  44. 5 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Having a break from ship building;made a Turks head for the bottle using my trusty jig.About half an hours work (for me) to make.
  45. 4 points
    Spanky

    Mayflower

    With this social isolation, and being newly retired, I thought I would launch into a new build. I bought some "plans" off ebay of the Mayflower for $5.00. Basically a few sheets of paper with some good information, ...but it's in German. At any rate I knew this ahead off time and just needed the basics to start.
  46. 4 points
    John Fox III

    Paper Mache Hulls

    Thanks for the idea! I have tried using thin oil and petroleum jelly, but it makes it more difficult to get the paper to stay in place while smoothing out the wrinkles and overlaps. I never have an easy job removing the boat hulls from the plugs, I just work around the top edges of the paper hull with the tip of a #11 exacto blade several times and then pop them off. Haven't had one tear or break yet. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  47. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    Viking Ship

    Well I think I've made a big mistake today. I decided to cut away the Bulwarks from the deck thinking that I was going to put them the shields and oars in one at a time after the main part of the hull and sail were done inside the bottle. Anyway I made a complete mess of it so now I'm strategizing plan B.
  48. 4 points
    MickyK

    Coronavirus around the world.

    Hi All, I'm down-under, and it's happening here as well. There seem to be "pockets" of contagion around Sydney, and most of them seem to have been instigated by people that had traveled into Aust from overseas. Now, like everywhere, there are travel bans in place, much tighter screening at airports, no large gatherings of people, most of our major sporting events either behind closed doors, or cancelled for the foreseeable future. The 3 deaths, so far, have been the elderly, living in nursing homes. My particular "self-isolation" is because I don't have much of a social life!! You may have seen on the TV news about our shortage of toilet paper, no-one has been able to explain "why toilet paper", I can under stand non-perishable food stuffs etc. So I hope everybody stays well, and it is a very good excuse to get on with your hobbies. Cheers Mick
  49. 4 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Managed to get the stern piece seated properly;quite pleased with that! Glued a deck winch and then inserted and glued the mizzen mast in place. Sails and flag are made from one of my old white shirts Last photo shows close up of the deck,cannons,hatches etc...One thing to say about threading rigging lines through the small deck eyelets; it can be quite frustrating, bit like threading a needle but doing it inside a bottle!
  50. 4 points
    exwafoo

    Swap Head tool

    Hi James, All Thanks for your comments No patent pending. Would not make any difference to a certain Far Eastern Country who would just copy and market it if they felt it would make money, like they have with so many other peoples ideas, Anyway, I've drawn it up and coupled with the phots you can build one if desired. The idea can always be adapted to suit whats available, Best for now Alan
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