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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  2. 9 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    Pride of Baltimore complete and bottled up!
  3. 7 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    And she's done! Completed today. Please bare in mind this is not a copy of any real tea clipper but just 'a ship in the bottle'.
  4. 7 points
    IgorSky

    What's on your workbench?

    ATLANTIC in progress...
  5. 6 points
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    Both engines done, fuselage sanded to shape, mostly. Done for today.
  6. 6 points
    joe100

    HMS Dreadnought, 125’ to the Inch

    I think we can cal this finished.
  7. 6 points
    Bruce has come up with a logo and it looks fantastic! Here's our new logo. I will soon be setting up some purchase-able items that will include it. Thanks Bruce!
  8. 5 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    Forward mast and most of the rigging done. Tried to experiment by super glueing cotton thread and then hanging it weighted at one end,so it would become rigid and straight. These I then cut up later and added to the rigging through the bottle neck. Sort of worked but a bit fiddly.
  9. 5 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    As it is a full hull size with no sea I construct a mini stand for the ship to sit on in the bottle. Made deck stuctures ,lifeboats,anchors etc. Poop deck railings made out of thin styrene which took an age to make. Decided to have just paper sails(its quicker!)
  10. 5 points
    Jim Goodwin

    SHIP PLANS!!!

    Like Alan, most of the plans I use come from books. I typically photocopy them to the scale I want to build. Howard Chapelle books are good and can be found on ebay and often used book stores. Cheers Jim
  11. 5 points
    Then I placed the bottle on another slipway, pulled out all the gear of the standing and running rigging, fixed their CA, cut off the ends and set the flag in the stern.
  12. 4 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    Main mast fixed.
  13. 4 points
    Nice over view of your work Igor! You do great work on tiny models, and agree those dead eyes were a bit too large and out of scale, better left off a model of this size. Your slipway is very ingenious, pegs and holes to hold the rigging lines is unique and a good way to do things. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  14. 4 points
  15. 3 points
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    A picture didn't post. Or I pushed a delete button
  16. 3 points
    DSiemens

    "Foochow"

    It's fun to see these all in one build logs. Magnificent work. The ship is beautiful. Your method ensured the lines were nice and tight and if really filled the bottle well. You did a great job.
  17. 3 points
    I am giving you a' like' for providing photo's of your ship failures;that takes courage to post them. We,ve all had our failures.I have a biscuit tin full of half finished hulls,broken masts etc. Love the deck details on the second model. It is sometimes very difficult to get the height spot on inside a bottle. Judging by the shelf in the background, you have had a lot of successes too!
  18. 3 points
    DSiemens

    Flop!

    It's extremely difficult to sell ship models in today's market. So many things can be mass produced and sold cheap these days. There's also a disconnect for the general public in regards to sailing ships. A lot of people have never seen a tall ship and they see rigging as a spider web of ropes. So they are ok with folk art models or art that show just a depiction of what a tall ship is. In order to sell a highly accurate model, for the time and effort that goes into that style you have to find the right demographic and that's very hard to do. I've heard the market exists but it's small and you need to know people.
  19. 2 points
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    I got it figured out!!!!!! The disk is going to be similar to the coin in a bottle magic trick. Forgive me for all bartenders, who try to impress the ladies with slight of hand magic tricks. It folds into thirds. I couldn’t remember the construction method, it had been so long ago. I think I passed the trick on to a protege. I found out, thanks to the inter web. Gathering supplies, blueprint is to scale. 85 mm long, 45mm wide, 22 mm tall. The disk might be the size of a silver dollar. Im going to mount it on a silver painted toothpick or transparent clear plastic rod, attached to a base. Bottle to be a 375mm rum bottle.
  20. 2 points
    exwafoo

    "Foochow"

    nice work Alan
  21. 2 points
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    Thanks Bruce. Onni
  22. 2 points
    Caleb

    G'day from Down Under

    Ahoy from Australia! I've been creeping around the forums for a while now trying to learn all I can from discussion topics and build logs with the hope of starting my first SIB soon. I'm a mechanical engineer, so I love the planning/problem solving stage as much as the actual build of any project. I intend to start a build log soon detailing my initial build plan, and I hope it gets picked apart with suggestions of improvement from the wealth of experience available here. Kind regards, Caleb
  23. 2 points
    Ahoy, I'm attempting my first SIB! I'm basing it off Alan's (exwafoo) Black Pearl plans. But more with a USS Constitution colour scheme. It is to go into a fittingly named, Captain Morgan - Black Spiced Rum bottle, 77mm internal diameter with an 18mm neck ID. I've taken inspiration in terms of aesthetics and build techniques from many of the build logs on here. I really want the ship to fill the bottle, as you say, so I have slightly stretched the plans to make the ship longer. I'm too scared of splitting a hull down the middle into left and right, so I will split it at the waterline, and add a small section for the rear high section, see sketch. It will be too tight to have fold down masts this way, so I will assemble them in the bottle and rigging and shrouds will pass through the hull, in a similar fashion to David's W. H. Dimond (DavidB773). I like the idea of the full ship hull being displayed, so I won't be doing a sea. Thus, the lines that need tensioning can't come out under the waterline... I'm thinking I will pull them up through the deck, glue, trim, and cover with deck items, like life boats, grating, etc. I'm trying to familiarise myself with all the terminology, and methods of rigging. Please feel free to pick apart my sketched plans below and let me know of any improvements or things to watch out for. Also, even though I will most likely be painting the hull, should I buy some Basswood to make it out of? Does it make thing a heap easier? I'm currently planning on using some Tasmanian Oak I have left over. It's a commonly available hardwood timber down here in Australia. Kind Regards, Caleb. Some methods of how I intend to do the masts and yards. Are loops required for the top of the square sails all the way along the length of the yard? Or were they only ever held at the corners/ end of the yards? How I plan to split the hull in three to make it fit through the neck. Showing how the rigging can tensioned through the deck. Is this mostly accurate? Showing Yard rigging.
  24. 2 points
    The Admirable was just listed as "Wrecked" with no further details - very short life! Bob
  25. 2 points
    Hi guys: I just wanted to pass along a resource that I haven't yet seen being incorporated in the builds on this forum. Some of you guys are using polystyrene in sheet form but did you know it also is available in a wide range of channel profiles? As soon as I found out about polystyrene as a viable building material, I was all in to try it. I just started my build of the Baltimore clipper "Harvey", and decided to incorporate some of these channels in it's build. When I get around to writing up my build of this ship when it's finished, you'll see how many applications I'll be using this channel for. Most importantly the making of deck furniture for sure. Anyway here are some pics of how I've used one of the I beam profiles and one of the stripe channels this company makes on my Harvey, build. They make a sheet too, that is a roofing material for model railroad houses that looks like it would make excellent decks. My ship has etched decks so I didn't use it yet on this build. This material glues, forms and sands very well. I love the stuff so far. Here's the link to the online catalog by Evergreen. On the home page menu if you click on shapes you will find their available profiles. https://evergreenscalemodels.com/
  26. 1 point
    Jeff B

    Starship Enterprise in bottle

    I'm "engines all stop."
  27. 1 point
    JesseLee

    Constitutionen

    Wow!
  28. 1 point
    Onni

    "Foochow"

    Thanks for your appreciation Daniel.
  29. 1 point
    Love the perfume bottle. I also like the flag on the bow. You don't see that often but but my understanding is bow staffs were very often used historically.
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    MickyK

    SHIP PLANS!!!

    Hi Bruce, I recently bought the plans for HMB Endeavour from this site. They look detailed enough for a small model. http://www.bestshipmodels.com/ Or you could have a look at, john-tom.com Cheers Mick
  32. 1 point
    I feel and share your pain. Best regards, Jeff
  33. 1 point
    I've read that complaint before and wondered how can anyone not at least have a pretty good idea of size by that. There is one in the UK that is almost demands that you use a pen instead of a coin. Some people are way to strict on things in their mind and need to loosen up some!
  34. 1 point
    Looks like a nice product.
  35. 1 point
    Caleb: Looks like you've got a nice project going. I'll be watching your progress along the way. I like the idea of passing the lines under and then up thru the deck. It's a technique I've never tried before but I know it can be done successfully. My biggest advice would be that you have to be patient with yourself and not let any hick-ups deter you from continuing forward. There is always a plan B. The first one is always an exciting adventure. Good luck Bruce
  36. 1 point
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    OK! I now have a ship in a bottle! Because of the height issue, I removed my clay sea, just soaked it in water, and it eventually came away. The epoxy that held the clay in place took 10 days of soaking it acetone. Cutting the bottom of the hull off is an option if it it done before bulwarks and rigging go on, doing it afterwards I think it would be a bit of a pain! Likewise, trimming the top of the masts. I really should not have to do either. So I glued the ship directly to the glass, and then poured in the ocean. All I have to do now is make a base for it, and she can go onto the shelf. Cheers Mick
  37. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Amazing ship-in-bottle video

    Ship in bottle Video by British Pathe 1944
  38. 1 point
    A few more photos and steps. Mark out where you want the gun ports. I eyeballed it. Probably not the best method but it was a quick way of doing it. After that its time to make the bulwark. I used a 1mm or 1/8th inch piece of bass wood for the bulwarks. Hold them up to the plans and mark the width. At this point the cuts are straight even though the bulwark will be curved. Cut the pice to be a little longer than the ship. Remember the length of the bulwarks curves around the ship so its a little longer than the length on the plans. From here place the piece in a cup of hot water and let it soak for five minutes. This will help the wood bend. From here cut out the sections of the bulwark in between the gun ports. This way you don't have to bend the wood vertically just horizontially along the edge of the deck. It also makes nice square gun ports. For bending I use a technique called breaking the grain. You soak the wood then bend it with tweezers until you get a crease on the inside of the bulwark. Do this along the bulwark piece and it will bend where you want it. The crease will be on the inside edge so no one will see it. Also glue oneside of the wood and let that dry then apply glue and bend the wood around gluing down the other side. The already glued edge will help it stay in place. Give the bulwark a good sanding then it's time for the cap rail. I cut this piece to be a little longer than the bulwarks are wide. In this case 1.5 mm. I soaked it and used the same bending techniques only this time going along the top of the bulwarks. Also note I didn't go all the way to the front. The bow bulwark have the tightest bend so I did a separate piece for this section. Also note the 1mm high bulwark are big for the plans. This falls into one of my rules for building. Cut big then sand small. Now that the rail is on the bulwarks it can be sanded thinner. I cut another 1mm pice to act as a channel amd used the same technique to glue it right along the line where the bulwark meet the hull. This does a great job hiding the lines between the bulwarks and the hull. Its now starting to look like a bermuda sloop.
  39. 1 point
    Then I proceeded to planking the boards.
  40. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    OK, IOAN! Thank you, David! This "patina" was formed naturally during the whole time of work. I just purposely did not clean the model before placing it in a bottle. But you will can see how I tried to make the "old" model in my other project. Best Regards! Igor.
  41. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    Now the building is almost completed. I'm going to put on the deck of a few bunches of firewood. And I need to come up anything with the stopper and the stand. And now you can see few total photos of the model.
  42. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    The next phase - installation of boats. I started with the lifeboat of the starboard.
  43. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    After repairing the damages, I could begin to install fore-mast. It took me two tries to do it
  44. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    Then I cut the damaged threads, made a new forestay, installed it in place and glued.
  45. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    Many thanks for your feedback, friends! No, Daniel, at this point the hull parts were glued together and I could not remove the ship from the bottle. But I continue this story... In the next morning I started to repair the breaches. At first, I pasted the eye in hole. I made a small and simple tool for the job. Preliminarily, I conducted several training sessions on the stand to test this idea.
  46. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    Despite my misgivings, the bridge was set almost immediately, but then ... I was horrified to find some damages... In this state, this was leaved until the next morning...
  47. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    And the slight improvement...
  48. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Steam schooner LENA. Scale 1/290

    The next stage - the deck. The important point - the first deck plank should be glued exactly in the center of the deck
  49. 1 point
    Shipbuilder

    Flop!

    Alan, They don't take 30%, but they add 15% to the hammer price that the buyer has to pay, and they take 15% off the hammer price from the seller, so although they get an extra 30%, it is divided between buyer and seller. But they do load on extra charges for the seller. The latest one being £150 non-returnable payment to be made by the seller to just enter a model in a sale! Consequently, there will not be a next time, because I no longer send them to auctions! The Wairoa and the Minnie, that you saw last week, are being collected personally on Sunday. Bob
  50. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Flop!

    Bob, Someone got a bargain. Do they really take almost 30% commission? Dick Turpin is alive and well and running an auction house! As they say on these antique shows on TV, 'You need the right person at the right sale' Better luck next time. Alan
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