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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/04/2020 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Fifty years ago this month (July) SS Great Britain returned to Bristol from the Falkland islands where she had been used as a storage hulk for many years and then abandoned. Built by Brunel in 1843 she was the first iron steamer to cross the Atlantic. She is now fully restored . I am going to try to build her as she first looked after her launch. On a trip to England last year picked up a Large 'Bell's' Whisky bottle so I was thinking that would be suitable enough for this large ship. I must of looked quite funny or a bit suspicious walking through customs with a huge bottle sticking out of my rucksack! Started by reducing some plans/drawings down to 1:250 scale for my model and then cutting out the basic shape with a band saw and power sanding and hand sanding into the rough shape. Used birch wood which is a fairly hard wood to shape.
  2. 5 points
    Ahoy, So I'm struggling to figure out a way to make the sails collapsable. The top few yards are narrow enough to fit through the neck without the need to rotate them, but the bottom yards need to be rotated. I've trialled this by securing the bottom corners of the top sails to their respective yards underneath. But it still seems to not easily allow the yards to rotate? Perhaps my sails are too rigid to allow free movement. Perhaps I should just be trying to secure the bottom corners of the sails to the yards once in the bottle? Any advice on this would be welcome. Also, I'm unsure of how I will run the diagonal rigging (like the top gallant stay) between the masts and then be able to assembly inside the bottle. I'm thinking I will be able to secure them all outside the bottle and set the spacing so when inside they will all be parallel. I've still got to drill into the side of the deck to allow the control lines to pass through from the main sails and backstays. Upon previous advice, I will now be attaching the yards as one in the bottle, not threading them through like I wrongly thought possible. For the yards I drilled out some thin wood, and then sanded the strips down even thinner and narrower post drilling. I then passed the yard lines through, glued and trimmed them. I will glue these little strips to the side once in the bottle. The backstays will pass through the side of the hull and come out the front. These should secure side to side and provide rear tension. The (royal?) top stays will provide tension forward. As for making the sails, I cut some cloth to size and ran some PVA glue along the edge and glued the thread. I knotted the top corners around a needle, glued with CA and trimmed the tail, in the same fashion as making thread blocks. These little loops allowed me to slip the sails onto the yards and secure with CA. I also added some detail to the prow. I cut thin strips of wood and soaked them in boiling water for a few minutes. This made them pliable and I was able to gradually curve them into shape and hold them there until they dried, keeping their curve. In all this handling, nearly all my handrails got bumped off. Not to worry I can re-attach/make more at the end now I know how to do it. Regards, Caleb.
  3. 5 points
    A hoy! I finally cracked the rear cabins and am happy with the result. The windows and stained glass are printed paper printed with a yellow grid pattern. To get the arched window frames raised, I bent a brush bristle in a tight radius to form a U. I then trimmed each side to length and glued their ends together. These got glued over the top of the printed paper, which got glued on top of a thin strip of wood. I capped the top of the windows with another piece of wood with a rounded edge for the roof. This rounded piece is slightly thicker than the first strip of wood. This allows it to hang over slightly which I like the look of. I beveled the corners of the side cabins roof with the rear cabins roof, again, just for looks. After a few attempts I made a helm I am happy with. I first made the spokes by lining up 8 bristles, I did an initial squaring off cut and then a final cut. This got all their lengths the same. Then I curled another bristle around a tight radius to make a coil. I then cut across the coil in the direction of its axis. This created a neat little circular ring. I drilled a hole in some scrap covered in double sided tape, and put the over length helm axle in the peg hole. This allowed me to line up all the spokes up against the axle. i removed the axle and the spokes stayed in position thanks to the double sided tape. I placed glue on the axle, placed the ring on the spokes and inserted the axle back in. After drying I could pry away the double sided tape, trim the axle length and I had a helm wheel! I also made the longboat using the plug and watered down PVA method. I found waxing the plug before layering it with PVA soaked tissue made it a lot easier to remove the dried mould. I added some seats out of some thin timber I cut down. I also made a grid pattern of bristles for the grating. I also added some stairs into the deck. I later coloured the walls black to add a bit of depth perception. I added some more handrails. I'll post again soon with details of sails and some more questions of course.
  4. 5 points
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All. Things are happening, progress is being made. The masts are sitting where they live, just have to now start attaching the sheets etc to the sails, and arrange them so that they can run out of the neck and stay untangled! Also photos of the quarter deck with the ships wheel, which I've made 5 or 6 of, and a hatch, one of the main deck with cannons all loaded, the ships boat actually lives between the cannons, and a shot of the anchors, which also took more than one attempt to make! So there is more to be done, just have to figure out how! Cheers, Mick
  5. 5 points
    Onni

    SS Great Britain

    As before in some of my other models I have drilled through the ships hull with 2mm diameter holes so that I can peg it together later with cocktail sticks after i cut it up.It should then go back together and line up perfectly. I then cut up strips of white styrene (0,3 thickness) to try to mirror the plating on the real ship. It also makes it a lot easier to bend around the bow and stern. It looks a bit opaque but once its painted, it should be solid looking. Looks a bit of a mess so I have to use a bit of filler and sand it down. Gt Britain's hull is a bit difficult to replicate as she has a waterline bulge with a bit of tumblehome (ships beam is wider than its uppermost.)
  6. 4 points
    You are correct that the bottom corners of the sails will be secured after going into the bottle. This is the way I've always done it and your right the yards can't rotate otherwise. The hard part in securing the sails sometimes one side sits to high and another to low. I suggest adding the lifts as you see in Alans diagram above. I use thread blocks so theres no hole drilled. Tie a thread block just above the mast and secure the line from one end of the yard through the black and on to the other. The line will slide through the block and still allow the yards to rotate. Once its in the bottle you can rotate the yards in there proper position and put a bit of glue on the thread block. This will help keep them in the right position. Gluing the lines at the bottom of the sails will also help keep them in the right position. Using both will secure it all together. I'm a little confused with the second section. I'm hopeful Alans illustration is helpful. I think you have a great set up so far. THis is what it looks like and tell me if I'm not understanding this right. You will be inserting the hull first and then the masts separate from the hull. The mast will be inserted into the hull and then the back stays, glued to the side of the hull. From there you need to secure the fore stays. I think Alans diagram shows this how this works really well. The only minor drawback is it shows a clipper and not a galleon. The principles are the same but its hard to compare as the clipper has a lot of masts and doesn't have the cross trees. I found it hard to find a non convoluted rigging plan but here's something. First some terminology and you may already know this. The cross trees are the parts where the sections of the mast come together. The Forestays on the real ship are connected at the cross trees. You can see above how the forestay runs from either the top of the mast to the cross tree one section down on the mast in front of it, or from a cross tree to the cross tree on the next section down. They aren't necessarily parallel but they look like they are. On a rela ship they are secured and each are separate lines. For a ship in bottle your simulating this but they are one continuous line. For instance one line from the main mast gallant crosstree that connects to the royal section, run to the the fore mast top and then to the bow sprit the line can then be run out of the bottle and tightened up and glued down once the ship is inserted. Which is all an over explanation of run the forestays between the cross trees and out the bottle. I hope this is helpful. Let us know if you have more questions.
  7. 4 points
    Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Had a bit of a break from the ship building to do a bit of a fun project which maybe I can incorporate into the bottle stand. The original photo of Brunel is taken by the launching chains of the Great Eastern so I would be using a bit of artistic license to use it with GB.
  8. 4 points
    Great job so far. The attached figures from an article published in Bottleship about 18 years ago may help with the rigging. Have a search through the forum for some recommended books, there is a thread (below) with a few. Looking forward to seeing this finished.
  9. 2 points
    IgorSky

    What's on your workbench?

    Hello, everybody! I was away for a while, but my work was progressing... Best Regards! Igor.
  10. 2 points
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Went out and bought some light blue felt just to finish off the inside of the old whiskey box and added/glued the ship's badge onto the side...and she's done. Pity Dad's not around to see it ,think he would of loved her.
  11. 1 point
    MickyK

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Hi All, I've started on a SIB of the HMB Endeavour, which is a relatively famous ship in this part of the world. I started about a month ago, after I'd visited the replica of the ship, and taken heaps of photos. As it lives locally in Sydney harbour, it was a nice day out! So far, I've shaped the hull, carved out of some nice straight grained soft wood from an old office table, which was about 40 years old. I've also played with masts and spas, with mixed success! The hull is sliced at the waterline, and so far, I can fit it down the neck of my bottle. (Always bonus!) This build is going to take me months, as I have to learn how to do and make everything. So any comments, criticisms, pointers where I'm going wrong, etc will be more than welcome. Thanks. Mick
  12. 1 point
    Onni

    SS Great Britain

    Thanks Micky. Originally I had planned just to cut it half vertically but after measuring the hull again and the bottle neck opening (27 mm) it will have to be cut horizontally as well,unfortunately.
  13. 1 point
    Chasseur

    HMS FURY 1942

    Thing of Beauty Onni! Chass
  14. 1 point
    exwafoo

    HMS FURY 1942

    Ship's badge is a nice touch. Alan
  15. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    I cheat! Well not really, I purchase photo etched railings from a Polish company called GPM (they produce mainly card models) but they also sell photo etched railings and other items. Of course I paint the railings first and then super glue them in place. Nice railings make a model stand out I think. If I tried to make them myself it would be a horrible mess I used 1:400 railings. The one's in the picture are 1:250.
  16. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Forgot to say she was a 'veteran' of Dunkirk, PQ17, Operation Pedestal (to supply Malta) and of course D-Day.
  17. 1 point
    Onni

    HMS FURY 1942

    Thanks Bernard. She was a 'F' class destroyer launched in September 1934.Dad told me that she could still do 35 knots on a good day. Her main claim to fame was transporting Edward VIII after his abdication, to France in the very early hours of the next morning.
  18. 1 point
    John Fox III

    HMS FURY 1942

    Amazing amount of fine detailing, excellent job portraying the ship! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  19. 1 point
    Ahoy, It's been a very busy month but I finally managed to squeeze in a few hours this weekend. I masked the channel line and cut grooves down to take the bulwarks. I glued the bulwarks on too thick on purpose. This allowed me to sand them down thinner to shape and allowed me to try and make the join between the bulwark and the hull flush. I will be running a channel along the join to hide it better anyway. I spent a fair bit of time making some little cannons. The cannon barrels are from bamboo skewers turned down and blacked with a felt tip pen. The wheels are bristles from a dust brush. The bases are from bamboo skewers cut/sanded flat and cut to size. Glued together with PVA. I still need to trim the barrel lengths down, right now they are easier to handle. I store them on the sticky side of some tape. Saves them getting blown away. I also experimented making some hand railing for the forecastle deck, again using brush bristles and bamboo flats. I'm experimenting with hatching. Using blacked bristles here. I laid them up, spread PVA all over, then wiped off the excess and allowed to dry. I'm still not sure if I'll use this method, or try another. I also started glueing the bulwark handrails on. I will cap with a thin strip of bamboo flat on top of the black bristle shown below. I'm thinking of buying some fly tying silk to start experimenting with shrouds and ratlines. How do you folks deal with fly tying silk having a flat profile? Not round? I read somewhere that someone tried splitting the threads. Or is that not required and the flat profile is that that noticeable? Thanks all, I hope to post again soon.
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