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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/28/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Hi All: Today I worked at making my sea inside the bottle and placing the hull into it. Putting the white caps around the hulls perimeter as well. Most importantly I placed the main mast into it's hole to see if it was going to crash the top of the bottles glass. It's pretty close. Fingers crossed here with the final execution, but I think I'll be alright.. You can also see in these pics that I still have to heat the bottom of the bottles glass to melt the clay and fuse it with the form of the bottle down there. I don't like bubbles and bumps down there. I like it to look uniformed and solid.Plus it seems to make the sea material anchor it's self. I also have, in these pics, a cork that I will be using and it has yet to be fitted to the taper of the bottles neck. I'll be doing that in the near future using my mini lathe, sandpaper , razor knife or whatever. I'm still having a hell of a time getting my sails and their masts and gaffs and booms working together but I'm determined to resolve these issues. Patients and time. That's what it is. Simple, right? I'm sailing on, putzing and such. Regards Bruce.
  2. 8 points
    Ship is ready, so started the sea in the bottle. First coat of acrylic paint is now in, and when dry will be covered in acrylic caulking for the sea. The black line is just marker pen on outside of glass used as a guide. Silica gel packets really speed up the drying process by soaking up the moisture in the bottle. 😁 The bottle as a really thick base so I will hide this with a rim of wood that will be part of the base.
  3. 7 points
    James w rogers

    Happy new year!

    Happy new year to all! 😃
  4. 6 points
    Onni

    CSS Alabama

    Positioned and checked mast heights. Drilled holes through the thin veneer for them and the jib. Also drilled holes carefully through the hull both horizontally and vertically so that the hull should go back together the same after cutting it in half and quarters by joining it with small pegs (cocktail sticks) The outside hull will be covered by a thin styreene that will hide any drill holes. I will have to cut carefully following my pencil line on the deck top so as to keep the mast holes secure and on the centre line. I won't cut the actual deck;it should go in whole.Have to travel to my craft/hobby club ( about half hours drive) to do the cutting of the hull on a band saw as I don't have one here at home.
  5. 6 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    The beginnings of a clipper. Flying Cloud? Cutty Sark? Lightning? Star of India? Not sure.
  6. 6 points
    A couple hours later the Capt came home, said it looked better before, so I uncorked it just now, and restored it back to this. so belay my last.
  7. 5 points
    Mizzen mast and sail are in and fixed, 2 more to go! In the foreground is my trusty paper clip on a stick, it's so useful. 😁
  8. 5 points
    Jeff B

    Build box

    Here's a couple of jigs. Put the ship on either end. Whichever is easiest to work on at moment. Run lines through finger slices of 3 x 5 card (movable) to keep them organized. Very portable. Kitchen table, workbench, one room to another. I have a fishing tackle box for tools and some metal cookie tins for other important items (and they all are). Best regards, Jeff
  9. 5 points
    Well, she's ready for the bottle. Now I need to put the acrylic in the bottle, this is my way of doing it. MOV_0067.mp4
  10. 5 points
    Found this card on Ebay a few years ago for a couple dollars and forgot I had it. Anybody know anything about these or time frame? Just thought it kinda interesting and right up our alley.
  11. 4 points
    Spanky

    What's on your workbench?

    Onni, Love the stand and SIB. Just starting a stand for my favorite SIB. It's a Jonny Reinert bottle and deserves a proper stand. Planning on power carving an octopus as the stand.
  12. 4 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    What's on your workbench?

    What a wonderful presentation idea. Looks great! Congrats Bruce
  13. 4 points
    JesseLee

    Happy new year!

    And to you too James!
  14. 3 points
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Daniel: I spent the last three days on the waves and the hull cavity. The largest amount of that time was washing away the clay that got on the bottles side. Acetone and cotton cloth. I still am going to go over all the glass again with some Windex before I put her in. This is the same Plasticine that you recommended to me and it literally melted to a liquid. The color seems to be fine though. Right now I'm in the midst of rigging her up. Hopefully she'll be bottled before the weekend is over. Regards B.
  15. 3 points
    Jim Goodwin

    CSS Alabama

    Have made this vessel numerous times...and one for a descendant of Capt. Semmes. Looking forward to seeing your log on her.
  16. 3 points
    The Bottled Shipwright *Now Hear this* The 2019 fall winter edition is out and can be found by; hitting the Clubs Tab and scroll down to it, or please hit the link above! "If you are new to our forum please join the club, as all are welcome."
  17. 3 points
    DSiemens

    Inspiration

    Another inspiration of mine has to be Gerard Aubry. "My goal is to put a maximum of poetry in my dream with hope that the viewer will travel with me." - Gerard Aubry Check out his work. I think he is very good at getting the viewer to travel with him. https://www.folkartinbottles.com/artists/artists-a-d/2-gerard-aubry I meant to open this thread up to the group. Who or what inspires you in this art?
  18. 2 points
    exwafoo

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    Hi Dan, A mile high? The highest we have in the UK is Ben Nevis at just over 4000 ft. Climbed it once in the days of my youth. Right! Bottle cleaning. I made a tool, one end of which is shown at the top of the photo below. Its a bamboo skewer about 15 inches long, with 2 pieces of brass tube bent and pushed on the ends ( the end not shown has a sharper angle). The inside diameter of the tube is just large enough to take the end of a cotton swab, I crushed the tube a bit to give grip. The different angles allow access to all of the inside of the bottle. Dip the swab in acetone, insert in bottle and scrub the offending water stain, glue (including super glue), sea, paint etc. Replace the swab when dirty. I've found this works well. I've stopped buying acetone from a pharmacy because its a lot cheaper to get it from a cleaning equipment supplier. Note the wooden swab stick. Besides being bad for the environment, the plastic ones will soften in the acetone. Best Alan If you
  19. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Top Sail Schooner Repair

    Thanks for the advice Alan. I'm going to look that stuff up. I don't normally have a problem with super glue. I've used it on a lot of my ships in bottles and typically as long as I don't bottle it seal it for about 15 minutes it's no an issue. I think what little fog I got on this one had to do with the smaller opening not allowing the fumes out and mostly because I had to use more than I normally would. Most of my ships are prebuilt and erected in the bottle. So I'll use three to four tiny dabs of glue on the bowsprit and that's it. Since this one had to be pieced together in the bottle I used quiet a bit more and had a small problem with fogging. I've cleaned it up and it hasn't come back. I do wonder to though if I have the dry and sparse Denver air to thank for that. My house sits over a mile high in elevation so maybe there is not as much air for the fumes to stick to on their way out of the bottle? Who knows. I am interested in the other type of glue though. I hadn't heard of using acetone to clean up the glass. Can you elaborate on how you do that?
  20. 2 points
    Tubjugger

    Tapering the yards

    I rough split and then use a draw plate to size the bamboo for the spar, then taper the spar either with a slip of fine abrasive paper or with a Jacobs chuck that fits my Dremel.I also generally favor eyes on the masts rather than drilling. TJ
  21. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Inspiration

    I ran into this video again. We have quiet a few new people on the forum and I though this was worth sharing. It's a quaint video but George Fulfit has been a big inspiration to my ship in bottle building. Not because of a special technique or style but watch how much fun he's having. I love his enthusiasm and his determination. If I'm having as much fun ship in bottle building as George Fulfit, I know I'm doing it right. https://www.nfb.ca/film/steady_as_she_goes/
  22. 2 points
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Then I installed and fixated the steering wheel, binnacle and the winch. And several views of the deck, before placing the upper part of the hull into the bottle
  23. 2 points
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    So, I also continue to learn. This model has become my testing ground for the testing new ideas and technologies I was continuing to work with sails. At first I have glued grommets using CA. But it was not the good idea. Then I tried to use Titebond II and then I have drilled holes.
  24. 2 points
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Then I just tried to draw them
  25. 2 points
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    On the deck should be binnacle
  26. 1 point
    This will be awesome.... Can't wait to see it. -- Bill
  27. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Well I've been so frustrated with not building anything because of this or that dead end, or this or that distraction, that I decided to go back to my roots and build a simple sloop so I could at least get going. I chose the" America", because years ago I made a,"Model Shipways" model of it. At the time I remember it took me nine months to build it. Working on it a few hours a night after work nearly every day. I decided to take my model out of it's case and photograph it so I had good references and I took the lines from the book I have called, "The Story Of Sail". So here's some pics of the model I made years ago.
  28. 1 point
    Onni

    San paolo 1743 xambekk malta.

    Wow,that was quick. Looks like it's going to be a cool build😎
  29. 1 point
    DSiemens

    What's on your workbench?

    Looks like a good start. Also enjoying the amount of flies in the background. Did you tie all of those?
  30. 1 point
    Onni

    HMB Endeavour, a scratch build

    Nicely carved hull.
  31. 1 point
    Jim Goodwin

    CSS Alabama

    A note about historic flags: the Alabama when launched carried the 1st National Confederate flag (Stars & Bars ). Not many folks can identify this flag I have observed. Later the 'Bama carried the 2nd National & Naval Jack which has the noted Battle Banner. I only make Confederate vessels upon request now and do not display them at art shows I attend. Given the association and controversy of the Battle Banner with current groups presently, it is the modeler's choice on what flag the vessel should bear. What one person finds offensive, another may find historically accurate. Certainly modelers striving for historical accuracy these days have a delima in view of our evolving culture. Still, the Alabama has a neat design and is a challenging build for a bottle. Cheers, Jim
  32. 1 point
    JesseLee

    What's on your workbench?

    I love it!
  33. 1 point
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    Thanks James.
  34. 1 point
    James w rogers

    AMERICA

    Looking great Bruce, that sea looks amazing!
  35. 1 point
    joe100

    HMS Ramillies

    Thank you! Very kind!
  36. 1 point
    James w rogers

    Da Seamans Sloop

    Really well done, love it! And happy Christmas. 😀
  37. 1 point
    Spanky

    Da Seamans Sloop

    She's sailing!
  38. 1 point
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    The 'Pearl' in pieces....
  39. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Terminology Help

    Here's the pdf version of the rigging primer. I can't always get the html version in the zip file to work. -Rigging Primer by John Fox III.pdf
  40. 1 point
    RSmith

    Terminology Help

    Also I wanted to get your all’s input on a couple books coming my way. What do you all think?
  41. 1 point
    Bruce Foxworthy

    AMERICA

    Now here's some pics of the hull as I was carving it.
  42. 1 point
    JesseLee

    Constitutionen

    Wow!
  43. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Great work Mick. She looks great. Great idea on the acetone. It's not something I would have thought of and took some time but it worked. I agree you shouldn't have to modify the ship if it's coming as a kit. You made it work though she really looks good.
  44. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Hi Mick, Jeff, Mick, seems we had the same thoughts on the quality of the base and thanks for the info on the holder. Much appreciated. Jeff, as a picture is worth a 1000 words and is definitely better than my ‘sketch’ here are some phots show how I do things. Not the only way by any means, but may give you ideas. I’ve used a hull of a clipper that I am building to demonstrate, ignore the peg sticking out of the bottom, that's temporary for holding in a vice. The photos below show the brass staple in the stirrer stick. I drilled pilot holes in both the stick and the hull to ease the fit – there is still enough friction to hold. The photos below show the stick pinned to the hull. The recesses are for access to the rigging when the masts are fitted. I would cut away some of the stick to gain access to the forward one. I’ve also glued a length of thread to the stick and then tied it around the hull to help support it. Its easily cut away when required. The photo below shows the stick being removed by gently pushing a styrene rod shaped to a chisel point under the bow after the thread has been cut. I’m thinking about putting a dogleg in the styrene rod to make it a bit easier for access. The phot below show some of the tools I use. Top to bottom- Swab stick holder – a wooden skewer with some brass tube at each end (different angles) formed to hold a cotton swab. I use these with acetone to clean the inside of the bottle. Acetone removes plasticene (for the sea) and glue (both CA and PVA) that may have found its way onto the glass. I don’t think you are the only sibber to catch things when gluing up in the bottle. Brass wire – on a length of glass fibre. Used to push, pull, poke, lift etc. I’ve also used it to place small amounts of glue where required because the brass bends easily. Small brush – a small brush head glued to a length of brass mounted in a wooden skewer. I use this for touch up paints and glue (dilute PVA). The brass can be bent as required. Two glue applicators – the top one used for in the bottle. Its a sewing needle, bent as shown, mounted in a wooden skewer and with the head ground down to a ‘U’ shape to hold the glue. The one below is similar but straight and only about 6” long that I use outside the bottle. I’ve found that to reduce glue going astray in the bottle I have a ‘dry’ practice run to check that the applicator will reach where I want. I hold it horizontally with the ‘point’ towards me, and place the bend in the needle on the inside of the neck furthest from me as I (slowly) insert it. This helps keep it steady and the gluey point away from the sides. I’ve also tried using slips of paper to protect the control threads. If I do catch the side then a quick wipe with acetone gets rid of it before it dries – its quicker when its wet. Hope it helps Best for now Alan
  45. 1 point
    As a kid I always had a fascination with naitical folk art & pretty much anything that was encased in glass. Ships in bottles being one example. I am fortunate enough to remember some of the old ‘true seamen’ of the town who were regarded as heroes. Visiting their homes with my parents or granparents would be a wonderful experience a bit like wondering arount a curiosity store. Almost every home would have at least one ship in a bottle. I was given a lovely piece as a gift from an old fellow from the Morris family. Even today looking at the little schooner fills me with wonder. Although I am new to this I did manage to build a ‘decent’ SIB that I was happy with. Sadly I did not create a build log. I have posted a photo on the FB page & will do on the forum once I figure out how. Atb Capten
  46. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    The idea of making this rigging of the boom was born suddenly for me. Feature of "bottle" modeling is that it should be possible disassembly of the rigging before placing the model in a bottle and reassemble all we have made before this, but inside the bottle. In this project, I am going to put into bottle the hull of the model piece by piece, and then later install the mast and pull the rigging.
  47. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    Then I continued to work with the front sails. Some time ago I cut a lot of rings of thin wire. I used some of them to simulate the eyelets, and the rest I decided to use for the simulation of small rings, which sails are attached to the front of the forestay.
  48. 1 point
    IgorSky

    Yacht J-class. Scale 1/300

    The mast and the boom. These parts have been made long ago. Now I just replaced some of the details (cross-pieces) and have drilled the necessary holes.
  49. 1 point
    Hi Don, that is a great story of how/what inspired you to become associated with ships in bottles. I find it interesting that for most of us, it was someone in our past who had an influence on us. Great story! Thanks for sharing it with us. Gwyl
  50. 1 point
    Hey Jeff, Some great reading from everyone. My story goes back To my grandfather who was an avid whittler. He was one of those that you see sitting on the front porch after everything was done relaxing with a knife and a chunk of wood. As an 8 year old, it seemed like he could carve anything. He gave me my first pocket knife. A yellow handle old timer. I'd give anything to find that knife. One year he made all of us grandkids a SIB for Christmas. Nothing elaborate but still enough to amaze all of us. Being the oldest, I was privy to this beforehand and watched him as he put them all together. Each one in a different bottle. It was literally an amazing site to see as was everyone's surprise when they opened them that Christmas. Soon after, he had passed away and the thought of ship building gave way to all the other things related to adolescence. Off and on something would happen that would bring those memories back, even as stated in another story on here, the 4th pirates movie. But it wasn't until a couple of months ago, when I turned 50 and there was this bottle that that i came across, that looked exactly like the one that my grandfather made for me and I had this overwhelming urge to finally give it a try and see if I can't produce the same memories for my future grandchildren that my grandfather did for me and that has led me here to this website and you good people.
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