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  1. 10 points
    I started with the main sail. The first thing I did was to get the paper ready. There are a lot of different methods for coloring paper, coffee, tea, or paint works. I've found a very light staining of golden oak gives a good weathered effect. I wipe off the excess on the edges and lightly stain the middle. From there I traced out the sail against the model. I like to give a wind filled look which means making the sails a little bigger than they are in the plans. Once its cut to size I draw on the details. I find a light board works well for this. You can go with out though. I used the light board to match up the reefing lines. If the wind is to strong the sailors would bring in the sails. These lines are where sail would shortened to. Once the first are on flip it over on the light box and trace the other side. After that I work on the sail panels. It would be almost impossible to weave together whole sails, they are far to big. So they wove together panels that were sewn together. Some one could probably find the general width of sail panels and get them all to scale but its not needed. I chose a width that looked good and went with 3mm apart. I marked the bottom edge with a line every three millimeters. Then drew a line parallel to the edge next to the mast. Once that was done I flipped it over on the light box and traced the other side. Then it was time to draw on the ties. When a sail is reefed ties on the sale are used to tie it down to the boom. I make these ties by putting a little "s" mark on each panel. Make sure to do both sides. Then I curl the sail. This is what gives the wind filled look. Take the sail between a pen or dowel and your thumb then pull it through. This will curl the sail slightly. Make sure to choose which tack you want at this point. Then glue the sail to the gaff and boom. Technically there would be hoops the connect it to the mast but I'm leaving those out.
  2. 9 points
    This next part has a lot of options all depending on how detailed you want to go. If you want to keep it simple leave off the topsails all together. In higher winds these would have been removed and it looks fine with out them. Here's an example. If you want to add more detail though the top sails look great. To put on the yard arms use the cow hitch and tie the yards to the mast. Running rigging will be used to keep the yards straight. There's a lot of options on this part as well. The Bermuda sloop is interesting because the running rigging is rigged forward instead of aftward like most bigger ships. This picture is a great example. For my ship I decided to rig the top two yards on the same lines. This is somewhat more advanced but it shows the type of things you can do in rigging ships. First you'll need a few thread blocks. One just behind the middle thread block on the bowsprit, one on the stay line at about the same height as the cross trees, two on the ends of the middle yard arm. Here you can see where the running rigging is going to go. Start it at the ends of the top yard arm, run it through the thread block on the stay line, then through the thread blocks on the middle yard arm, then through the thread block on the bowsprit. There's a trick you can do on this part. Its less realistic but reduces the lines coming out of the bottle. Tie the running lines to the end of the top yard arm, then pull them through the thread block on the stay line, last tie the ends to the middle yard arm and cut them off. Letting the lines slide through the thread block you can adjust the tack of of the yardarms. If you want to go more realistic run the lines down to the bowsprit then drill a couple holes through the hull just behind the front bulwark and on either side of where the bowsprit attaches to the deck. Run the lines through these holes and under the ship. The advantage to this method is you don't have to be precise in cutting these lines because they will be under the sea. For the bottom yard tie lines to the end and through the same block on the bowsprit and then back to the holes in the hull. At this point the ship is ready for sails.
  3. 8 points
    DSiemens, this is a great choice for learning, thoroughly enjoying this build. It really is a beautiful vessel, partly because of it's simplicity.
  4. 8 points
    Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Here's the final product.
  5. 8 points
    Lubber123

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    My personal SIB collection remained at three for a long time: one I found, one that was a gift and one I built from a kit. One day about ten years ago I was on a fishing trip on Cape Cod when I wandered into a gas station cum tackle store to buy some hooks. I don’t remember how I ended up in a back room of the store but in this room was a large collection of ship models in various states of repair. Some of them were in cases, some were in pieces and some had price tags on them. I could tell that this was a collection from a serious builder who apparently was some relationship to the couple who owned the store. I remember picking up a business card but it has long been lost. I think the builder was located in Newport, Mass. but I’ve lost the name. Among this collection was a lone SIB that I recognized in to be inside a real Haig & Haig bottle. Without hesitation I purchased the model for an uncontested ask of $15.00. At the time I thought it was very neatly done but now that I look at it closely I see a lot of machine-made prefabrication: printed sails and a paper appliqué type siding on the hull. It has a neat obliviously machine made “Bluenose” name plate inside. It still has a nice look to it and doesn’t look as cheap as the “overseas” manufactured plastic bottle things. It almost looks like somebody took a kit model ship and put it in an authentic Haig & Haig bottle. I never found that shop again or any online information about the name I had. I think the builder is deceased and some of the models ended up in an art gallery that went defunct and is now a real estate office that has one of the larger models in a window collecting dust. My other Cape Cod find was from an antique shop in Provincetown. I found a lone SIB that was very nicely done and obviously handmade. It’s a Gloucester fishing vessel, almost a dead ringer for the “Elsie” model I have recently finished, housed in a green glass magnum wine bottle which doesn’t detract from its appearance. Considering most of the poor examples and cheap imitation SIB’s I usually find, I didn’t mind paying $40.00 for it. It was obviously made by someone who knew what they were doing. It has neat deck furnishing and non-hinged masts glued in place after insertion. The hull and furnishing look so neat that I almost suspect some pre-fabrication. The sail cloth looks like the sail cloth that came in my 1970’s vintage SIB kits. So, it could be a kit build that was upgraded to a nicer bottle with a green putty sea. That’s about the extent of the models I’ve purchased. I really don’t want to collect other people’s work unless I can find some top-notch build for a bargain. I have a collection of materials and I just needed some incentive to start building my own again and just do it for my own amusement.
  6. 8 points
    Now we move on to the boom. Remember the hole we drilled in the mast while putting it together? This is where its used. You could use a thread block for this as well but since near the base of the mast, where it is thickest, I determined a hole would be fine. Tie a line to the end of the boom that will be next to the mast. That line will go through the hole in the mast and out of the bottle. The idea is the boom will be able to separate from the ship and allow the sail to roll up. Since I'm planning paper sails this is important to the sails don't crumple up. From here I tied a couple thread blocks on the other end of the boom. As I simplified the rigging I found you only need one. This is where the rigging on the plans can differ from the rigging on a ship in bottle. With some effort you can copy the rigging in the plans exactly. This is supposed to be a simple model though so I'm going use a mixture of planned rigging and simplified ship in bottle rigging. According to the plans there is some blocks on the transom that help control the boom. I made a small eye bolt for this block and glued it in a hole drilled into the transom. I did two on either side of the Windows. You can do one in the middle as well. I suspect the actual ships would have two so they can quickly adjust the boom while tacking. I decided to use two for mine but one central eyebolt would work. Here's another place I differ from the plans. It appears on the plan that the line runs from the block at the transom to the block at the end of the boom, back to the transom block, then back to the boom block then it runs to the bulwark. I initially tried this but I couldn't pull the lines tight very easily. The added lines add a lot of strength on the real ship at a point that holds a lot of pressure. This isn't needed on a ship in bottle so I reduced the number of lines running back and forth. I tied the first line to the thread block on the boom, ran it through the transom block, back to the boom block then to the hole drilled in the bulwark. With one less line it pulls tight more smoothly. The line going in the bulwarks then runs out of the bottle. It will be tightened and glued down after the ship is in the bottle. If you only have one block in the transom you only have to do this once. I opted for putting lines on either side. One more part that differs from the plans. Technically there is separate lines used to pull the gaff tight and life the boom up. This can be consolidated by tying a line from the gaff to the boom. This also tightens up all of the lines. You can see how the yards will be set at this point.
  7. 8 points
    Time to get into yards arms and running rigging. This is a little tricky since parts of the running rigging works off of other parts but little by little it comes together. First lets start with the gaff. When it some to yard arms I prefer to tie them on instead of drilling holes. This keeps the overall strength of the model while enabling the use of parts that are more to scale. One of the primary knots I use for this is the cow hitch. This is particularly useful for square rigged sails. You can tie a cow hitch on the yard arm and then use the ends to tie the yard arm onto the mast. I used this same method for the gaff. Tie a cow hitch on the gaff and use the ends to tie it to the mast. I find it easier to tie the knot around the base of the mast then slide it up into place and glue the string to the mast. The gaff should be able to raise up and down and move side to side on the knot. For the halyard on the gaff tie a thread block on the end end of the gaff. Then tie a string to the mast just above the cross trees. Run it through the thread block the tie it to the mast at the spot you started. Cut off the excess. If you want it to be slightly more realistic you can run it down to the bulwarks where it would be tied off. This is a bit over kill so I just cut it off. The important part here is the length of the gaff halyard. You want the halyard to be tight with the gaff at the angle it is on the plans.
  8. 8 points
    Still lurking in the shadows here. I still haven't fixed my Galleon. I am however adapting DSiemens sloop slightly as I have a really big bottle with a very small neck Im using. My sloop hull is split into 3 sections and my rigging will be slightly different but following these instructions otherwise.
  9. 7 points
    I'm really happy to see other builders trying this build out. If nothing else its a proof of concept. Really you can use the same method that this build uses and build any ship you want. There's a million other methods out there its all about finding what works. This type works for me. As far as the rest of the sails its the same method. Cut them out, draw on the panels and give them a little wind curve. Making sure to follow the same tack. I like to give the jibs some fun looking panels. I'm not sure if its historically accurate but i like the look. Glue the jibs right to the stays. I give a bit of room between the jib and the thread block. The last thing you want is to find you can't pull the line tight because the jib has stopped the line at the block. I didn't put any reefing lines on the square sails. These sails would have been hoisted up in low winds so reefing them would mean just taking them down. Which as mentioned before if you want to simplify this build further leave off the square sails all together. It still looks great with out them. I ended up moving the middle spar a little higher to fit the sails. As far as the square sails go I hive them a curl and glue what would be the top front of the sail to the bottom of the spar. This allows the curl to go out and look like it has some wind. The last lines I glued on were the jib sheets. Theres a trick to these so you don't have to have three more lines coming out of the bottle. First get your jibs set up so they are catching the wind. To do this twist the stay lines and let then losses and tighten them. You'll notice as you do this the jib rotates around the line. This can be done while its in the bottle as well. Get the jibs where you want them then glue a line at the open corner of each jib. Bring the three lines together and glue them all together. Cut off the excess With enough left to tuck behind the bulwark. You can glue them to the bulwark once its in the bottle. Since the jibs naturally pull the line outward it goes right into place once its tucked on the opposite side of the bulwark.
  10. 7 points
    Lubber123

    First SIB build in 40 yrs

    I had not built a ship in the bottle model since some time in the early eighties. All my scratch built models were given away as gifts and the only model I had in my possession was the first model I had built, a kit build from the 1970’s. Through a series of circumstances I once again came back to building ship models. I was surprised that my eyes have actually improved for close work with my age and I can take my glasses off to work small. And my hands are still steady enough, hopefully having been practiced from years of fly-tying and art drawing. In a fit of clearing out possessions I found a partially built Model Shipways “Elsie” 1/8” scale Gloucester Fishing Ship model and a box with my old ship in the bottle collection of materials, books and the instruction sheets from my old kits. I sat down and finished the “Elsie” model which probably took me over 150 hrs of work to complete - I even added sails. I learned a lot about modeling and ships by doing this and I also learned the value of having good plans to work from. So now I wanted to reprise my first SIB kit build, “the Lively Lady” that I clumsily cracked the foremast on when mounting the ship in the bottle. I still had the “Ship’s A Sailin’” instruction sheet and the first thing I noticed was that not all the drawings were to scale or even the same scale so I first set up a “canon” to work to. I did a little research and surmised that the “Lively Lady” was not a historical model so without exact plans it’s hard to hold to any degree accuracy or feel too constricted. However, I did apply some of my ship knowledge acquired from building my “Elsie”. I even had some left over kit materials that I could use and I had a large quantity of sail cloth left over from my “Elsie” build but I had to carve the hull from scratch and make all the masts and spars from dowels. I even had a small collection of liquor bottles my dad had saved for me from his bar-tending days and I picked a bottle that is a bit long for the model but I just wanted the practice of doing an SIB again. I remembered from my other builds that I had first made putty seas from some old plumber’s putty colored with some artist grade oil paint but switched over to “Plasticine” which was available in the 1980’s. Now all I could find in the local craft store was a kid’s modeling clay something like “Play –Dough” which is a bit too cool of a blue for a sea but that’s what I could find. The bottled model didn’t photograph as well as I’d like, maybe due to the curvature of the glass playing with the lens elements of my camera. I have to say the model looks more impressive in life. But I did take a “before launch” shot of just the ship. I even attempted a “Turk’s Head” knot on the bottle neck but only accomplished a “decorative braid”. I just had one small mishap which probably only I can detect but I consider that a general hazard of putting a ship in a bottle. Overall, I was encouraged by my attempt and have decided on a course progress to continue building.
  11. 6 points
    The third SIB in my collection was of my own construction. This was from a kit series that was readily available in model shops and department stores in the 1970’s. These were offered by a company called “Ship A’ Sailin’” out of Santa Susana, California – copyright 1971 J.O. Knight. I built two kits from this series: the “Lively Lady”, which I still have and the “Gjoa” which was given away. The third ship in the series was the “Skeeter”, which I never owned but just recently purchased an NOS example of. The $1.98 on the box must be a later tag sale price because I remember these kits to be priced somewhere less than $10 in the mid 1970’s. This series of kits may have been extended into the 1980s as the “Woodkrafter’s” series which have a very similar look but I never owned one of these for comparison. The “Skeeter” that I purchased may have been an earlier edition of the kits I purchased judging from the instruction sheet and the materials included. A nice touch that wasn’t in the later kits I purchased is a nicely engraved metal name plate for the base, mine was just a faux metal paper sticker. I plan to keep this kit intact as a keepsake and maybe build the model from scratch from the plans. I enjoyed reading the little descriptive histories on the back of the box. I am now informed about Roald Amundsen’s Arctic Exploration in the “Gjoa”, the history of Canadian fisheries disputes on ships known as “sharpshooters”. However I believe the “Lively Lady” to be a fictitious 1812 privateer perhaps taken from the novel by the same name. The kit was fairly complete and allowed me to almost 100% successfully build my model. The instruction sheet was very straight forward and provided my initialization into model ship in a bottle building. I still have both instruction sheets which can be used for scratch builds but I found that the dimensions are somewhat compromised. My construction was successful enough that I started receiving request from family members, examples that do not survive. The kit was all inclusive with rudimentary tools and a clear glass bottle with a cork. The bottle could have been an empty “Miller Highlife” beer bottle or perhaps a pop bottle but has no bottle deposit information or any other imprint. The sail cloth was also included but is too coarse for the scale. I took some liberties with the “Lively Lady” design, most of which worked out. My one alteration that caused me trouble in the end was the addition of the putty sea. No putty was included and the instructions called for a sea of glue which was to be colored with ink or food dye. Of course the addition of the thickness of the putty was not accounted for in the design and I ended up cracking the foremast during final set up. As I look back on this model some forty years later I don’t think I did such a bad job. Even the cracked foremast isn’t that noticeable. Sometime later I managed to add a surprisingly neat “Turk’s Head” knot on the bottle neck. The kit was a good introduction to basic SIB building and these kits allowed one to make a model that looked somewhat authentic. I now find that the dimensions of the ships were highly modified to accommodate the small glass bottle so accuracy was sacrificed. Other SIB kits I’ve seen look very cheap or compromised but kits are still a good way to learn. The techniques learned are easily applied to scratch builds from more accurate plans.
  12. 6 points
    James w rogers

    Happy days!

    Glad the sites back up and running, that felt like someone had nicked my sweets! I'd be lost now without it! 😂 😂 Happy days are here again! 😀😀
  13. 5 points
    Lubber123

    My Second Recent SIB build

    With my interest renewed in building ship-in-the-bottles I decided to try to further my skills and take a path of self learning. I had only limited instructional materials available as well as some examples from other builders and the instruction sheets from my old kits as guides. I first decided I wanted to re-create the original “Ship’s-A-Sailin’” SIB Kit model line and had already built the “Lively Lady” but I also wanted to work on a more remedial model to help sharpen my skills. I pulled out my old “Modeling Ships in Bottles” by Jack Needham, gave it a thorough read and realized his first “Simple Model for Beginners” was equivalent to the “Skeeter” model in the S-A-S kit line so decided that this would be my next build. I also wanted to experiment with a head-land background and I had a short but fat round bottle I wanted to try. The model is a simple two masted schooner. For being a simple model I had difficulty getting a hull correctly shaped and ended up cracking two before I got one – I don’t recall ever having a problem shaping a hull in the past. On this model I decided to try and make the sails out of paper instead of the using the extra sail cloth I had left over from my 1/8” scale “Elsie”. This went OK but I marked the seams a bit too heavy in pencil and slightly creased one sail during insertion. I also tried to color my “Model Magic” play-clay sea with acrylic paint to get a deeper, warmer blue but the paint didn’t mix into the putty well, it sort of sat on top instead of mixing in, didn’t dry as fast as I would have liked and it made the putty somewhat sticky and soupy. I ended up marking up the model with the colored clay but Jack did suggest getting some putty on the sides of the hull to simulate sea-spray. However my background came out well and I included a little head-land and a lighthouse. Again I attempted a Turk’s Head knot which turned into a “decorative braid”. I even embedded a foreign coin into the melted wax seal on the cork. The ship is a little small for the bottle which has a difficult dimension of being short and stout but the addition of the background and light house helps fill the space. So I had some lessons learned but still came away with a nice model a step above my early kit builds.
  14. 5 points
    John Zuch

    Happy days!

    When I get up thi is the first site I go to
  15. 4 points
    Hafid

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Hello, my name is Hafid. I am new to this hobby. I do not know much about boats but I love the way they look on bottles, I think it's a very beautiful art. I have some projects stopped because I have several questions about its construction and assembly. Thank you for your support and I am willing to help. My first project "RMS Titanic"
  16. 4 points
    DSiemens

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    Its fun to see finds like this. The Elsie looks especially good. Thanks for sharing. I'm impressed by your photography skills as well. That lighting looks great.
  17. 4 points
    Lubber123

    My First Build - 1970's SIB Kit

    Thanks! I eventually purchased a copy of Peter Thorne's book on SIB's and enjoyed his description of the origins of them. Even the sailors who made the authentic ones had a distorted vision of proportions and could only work with what they had on hand so a little "unrealism" can add to their charm. I suppose this can be controversial but when I went on to build my earlier scratch models I used to like to pretend I was building them in the hold of a rocking ship with just the materials I could scrounge, so I kept them simple. However I did very early dispense of the "pin stuck into a pencil eraser" drill and brought a proper pin drill and bits...It's supposed to be fun you know.
  18. 4 points
    Looking good. I like your bottled ships wall display in the background. Very nice.
  19. 4 points
    JesseLee

    Happy days!

    Me too!
  20. 4 points
    Chasseur

    Happy days!

    No Kidding James!
  21. 4 points
    James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

  22. 3 points
    DSiemens

    NCC-1701

    I've contemplated the Serenity from Firefly in a bottle but haven't gotten to it. I agree it would have to be in pieces but totally do able. I'd look into how houses in bottles are built. I think it would be very similar. There's a couple builders here who have done buildings in bottles. Look up the Żuraw Gdański by Artur. Thats a great example.
  23. 3 points
    Bernard Kelly

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Hello Hafid There are some great modellers on this forum and they will be happy to take you along with them, step by step, if there is anything you need to know. Sometimes you need a specialised tool to work inside the bottle or a jig to help form a certain item. There is nobody more inventive than the bottle shipwright. I have been attempting to perfect this art for fifty years and I am learning every day from these lads. Bernard
  24. 3 points
    JesseLee

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Welcome Hafid! This a great group of people, feel free to ask all you need to. Jesse
  25. 3 points
    Good catch Spanky. Yes I use a thicker black thread for standing rigging and then a thinner 8/0 fly tieing thread for running rigging. This is because the standing rigging was used for support and they would have used a thicker rope. Since it didn't move the standing rigging was covered in tar to preserve it. The running rigging had to move through blocks in order to adjust sails. It also had be thin enough to hold onto an pull. So I use a thinner brown thread to simulate the running rigging.
  26. 3 points
    exwafoo

    Happy days!

    I was beginning to worry a bit as all I could get was 'Unknown Domain'. Guess it took longer to evict the gremlins than estimated. Al
  27. 3 points
    Jeff B

    Happy days!

    Here. Here!
  28. 3 points
    John Fox III

    Amazing ship-in-bottle video

    Truly remarkable models on display! Thanks for sharing! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  29. 3 points
    Chasseur

    Amazing ship-in-bottle video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YTNYzHCksE This video, I believe, is the work none other by Heather Gabrielle Rogers. She is a true artisan of our hobby! https://www.folkartinbottles.com/artists/artists-i-r/35-gabrielle-rogers
  30. 2 points
    Jeff B

    My Second Recent SIB build

    Looks good to me! Nice work! On to the next one?!
  31. 2 points
    It does leave a mark on the inside edge but not the outside edge. I will get some photos and show what this looks like. The advantage of the ship being in the bottle is the inside edge is hard to see so I"m not worried about anyone seeing the marks. Also a little bit of sanding will diminish it slightly.
  32. 2 points
    Thanks, it is however 3 times larger so I have a lot more room, and your CPA is your priority right now. Really great thread though. As a newbie, it opens your eyes a bit to how things "should" be done. Hopefully I can get it in the bottle O.K.
  33. 2 points
    Jeff B

    NCC-1701

    So I have been thinking for some time now, about the starship Enterprise in a bottle. How hard can it be? (Laughing) Obviously it would have to be in pieces. I was thinking fishing line instead of pegs. Put them in loosily, then slide pieces up on the line and position and glue tight. It would probably need a support base for the ship, not the bottle. Clear acrylic, or hang off a fishing line from top of bottle. Could be inverted, hanging off a cork as well. Any thoughts and ideas? Had anyone does this?
  34. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    You and my dad would have a lot of fun talking. He has an old camera collection. I know he has at least one or two old Brownie's. I only ever shot in 35mm and digital. I still have my Cannon SLRs. Its a great hobby. Actual developing is a true art. Growing up in the days of one hour photo I don't know that many in my generation understand all that goes into it.
  35. 2 points
    Lubber123

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    I actually still do a lot of film work. I process everything myself from 16mm to 4x5 (and APS). My other hobby is collecting and restoring film cameras and I especially like funky toy cameras.
  36. 2 points
    Hafid

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Thank you! DSiemens, Onni, CharlieB
  37. 2 points
    Onni

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Welcome Hafid.
  38. 2 points
    CharlieB

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Welcome aboard!
  39. 2 points
    DSiemens

    Hi from Puebla Mexico

    Welcome. That looks great! Ask anything you need we are here to help.
  40. 2 points
    Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Bermuda sloop is back in the bottle! yay!
  41. 2 points
    For some of the next parts I'm going to use what called a thread block. John Fox III has created an excellent video demonstrating how this works. This thread block is part of how I get away with thinner, somewhat closer to scale masts and yards. The smaller the dowels get the harder it is to drill holes and the holes compromise the integrity of the mast and yards. Tying thread blocks creates places for lines to pass with out compromising the strength of the mast and yards.
  42. 1 point
    JesseLee

    NCC-1701

    I like the idea, I am a big Star Trek fan. I have wondered about this before but never spoke about it to anyone. I thought I saw a picture of one online one time during one of my endless searches for something and getting sidetracked at other things I see. I sort of skimmed by it because I figured it was photo-shopped or something. I hope you can figure it out because I would love to see this! Jesse
  43. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    The extra effort really pays off. I grew up helping my dad in a dark room and studied photography in high school. Maybe thats why I noticed your work. Good to see another photo enthusiast on the forum.
  44. 1 point
    Lubber123

    Cape Cod SIB Finds

    Thanks! The Gloucester Fishing vessel very much impressed me but I don't know how someone could produce such fine detail by hand. Even the tiny fishing dories are hollowed out. The ship is a bit "too perfect " and is incongruous with the weird choice of a wine bottle and coarse putty sea. Thanks for the comment on my photography. I'm an advanced amateur photographer and understand lighting. I use a semi pro DSLR, no flash and a polarizing filter to reduce some glare. I have a home made shadow box I use for other purposes as well. A little clean up in post helps too.
  45. 1 point
    James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Ship ahoy! 😊
  46. 1 point
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    I got a chance to work on the mount that holds the hull in the light bulb and soldered up the Bow Sprit and Jib Boom complete with Martingale. I referenced Underhill's book for this. I had to build a special jig from a miniature close pin to hold the Martingale while soldering. I chose the eyelet end of a sewing needle for ease of rigging later! Tweezers show scale reference Note dot of glue to hold the needle while soldering into position. Used some thin wood shims to get the proper positioning. Here is the completed Bow Sprit/Jib Boom less paint, foot ropes, Head/back stays, and guys. Still some intricate work to do on it today!
  47. 1 point
    Hi, I’m a new member. I’ve been interested in SIB’s since I was young and built a few when my hands and eyes were in better shape. I’m finding that my eyes now have actually improved for close up work as I’ve gotten older so I’ve renewed my interest in building ship models. I have a minor collection of SIBs which I may post a few of later. Unfortunately, I gave away as gifts all the best examples that I made myself and few survived their new ownership. What got me interested in SIBs was this model I found in the basement of the house we moved into on Long Island, New York in June, 1964. The house was a typical post-WWII tract home probably built in the late 1940’s, early 1950’s and we purchased from the original owners. I kept this model in my bedroom when I was growing up and have had it with me ever since. I never thought to research it until recently so here I am. I’ve done some minor investigation at least of the bottle. Since I found the model in 1964, its construction certainly predates that. The bottle has a screw cap thread which weren’t invented until about 1910. It must be a machine made bottle and to me it looks like a typical one fifth whiskey bottle – say like Dewar’s White Label Scotch or such. The mouth of the bottle is about say 5/8’s of an inch in inner diameter, typical for a whiskey bottle. There are no markings or words embossed in the bottle with the exception of a dimple on the base which may be an imperfection or a poorly formed maker’s mark. If I tilt the bottle at an angle in looks like it may be an anchor but not an anchor with an H or box around it. This might suggest Anchor Cap and Closure but not Anchor Hocking however it isn’t clear enough to be sure. Anchor Hocking wasn’t incorporated as such until 1937 but Anchor Cap and Closure was in business starting 1913. Of course without any clear markings I can’t even be sure the bottle was made in the USA but from all apparent signs it appears to be a liquor bottle and if it contained liquor that was sold in the US from 1935 to 1964 it would have to have been imprinted with words stating that the US Government forbids its reuse. So, assuming it is indeed a liquor bottle it could have been filled with liquor some time from 1910 to 1935. The US had a prohibition on liquor sales from 1920 to 1933 but there was no prohibition on the production of liquor bottles which could have been exported say to Canada or Scotland. So, it could also be a bottle that contained liquor that was illegally imported during prohibition. Ok, so that says something about the bottle, which had to pre-exist the ship. So the bottle could have been full or empty for sometime before the ship got put in it. It could also be a bottle that was manufactured for a company specifically for ship in the bottle kits so no markings would have been needed to be applied or some other non-liquor application. I need to disclose that I performed some repairs and modifications of the model as it exist today. I added the wooden base and I replaced the cork that I think was originally sealed with wax because I wanted to re-glue a stay that had pulled out of the bowsprit. I believe this was the middle one that is sagging a bit. I also added the Turk’s Head knot on the bottle neck. The ship and sea and background are as they were when I found the model. The model is a paradox of crudeness mixed with artistry. The hull looks roughly hewn, the main deck is roughly chiseled out and the white paint on the hull is lumpy and poorly applied which makes me think the wood didn’t take the paint well. The hull was probably not sanded well or primed and the wood seems like it may be an open grain wood like pine. The deck, masts and spars seem stained but not varnished. The main stays are of some rough cord, not thread. The mast and yard arms are rough and not sanded and shaped and seem to be made from some type of rough wood, not dowels or tooth picks. The masts are hinged to the deck with metal wire like hinges that may be copper or brass. However, the bow is so nicely formed it looks like it could have been machine carved and the bowsprit is joined to the hull with small wooden tendons and are very flush in a neat piece of joinery. The spars, gaffs and booms are joined to the mast with what looks like very fine brass wire that is very neatly twisted. I say brass wire because after all these years it is as bright as ever with no signs of corrosion. The shrouds also are neatly formed from thin thread and are neatly knotted in some very fine work. But what still awes me after all these years is the artistry that was applied to the headland in the background. The lighthouse and small buildings are neatly constructed and applied with care with a neat flourish of white foam. Initially I assumed that one of the kids that lived in the house before us had made it but I doubt a young kid could have made all that background look so convincing. The model looked like it was purposely left behind on the empty shelf case in the basement. No one ever placed any significance on it to inform the previous owners that it was left behind. For a long time it sat untouched on the shelf in upright position because it would otherwise roll off a flat surface and couldn’t be displayed. One day I decided to make a base for it and put it in my room. I never actually considered it was mine, it belonged to the house. So here I submit to you experts my photos of this legend to see if anyone can add to anything I’ve determined. For all I know this could have been a kit model from the 1940’s or 50’s that was popular for its day or it could be an authentic model from an Old Salt in say the 1930’s. Please opine freely.
  48. 1 point
    Oh yeah I was going to explain those. I've experiment with various ways of doing dead eyes and I thought I'd add one method into this beginners build. This is purely optional and their are other more advanced methods that work well but if your just starting out this method works pretty well. What I did was get some paint on the end of a toothpick and just tap the back stay where the dead eyes go. Let the paint dry and do this over and over until the paint builds up into a little dot and looks like a very tiny dead eye. It will take five or sick coats so be patient with it, of coarse thats the name of the game with this hobby.
  49. 1 point
    First one more set of back stays. Following the plans I drilled a hole in the bulwark. I then tied a line to the top mast about mid way down. I gave it a little glue so it doesn't move then ran the lines through the holes on the bulwarks. I then tied my temporary forestay on and set the rake angle. These back most back stays are the most important in setting the rake so the must be perfect. Once the rake is set I secured my temporary forests on the bowsprit with a tiny amount of glue. Enough its easy to pull off but also enough to hold the rake while I adjust my back stays. From there I pulled one backstay tight and tested the rake and strength of the forestay. Once all was secure I pulled the line out just a little, then put a little glue on the end going into the hole and pulled it back tight. Once the glue set I did the same on the other side. The glue holds the line in place while I tie a knot around the bulwarks. Once the know is secured I glue them down and cut off the ends. Once done in can take off the temporary line and prep the bowsprit for the fore stays.
  50. 1 point
    I just got the same bottle... I'm ready.
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