Jump to content
Bottled Ship Builder

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Here are some photos of the second James Miller model. It is housed in a 9" diameter clock that was made to look like a pocket watch case. The case is actually cast bronze, quite heavy.
  2. 7 points
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    I'm back, Hi all. Finally got her painted, and all the deck furniture in place. There are a few issues, some I think are built into the kit, some are mine! If anyone builds this kit, when you cut the slot for the photo-etched brass keel, take great care to make it very neat, and close fitting, especially around the bow area. I had to put in tiny amounts of wood filler to make it fair. If there was no filler, the laminates of the bread and butter hull would indicate planking, which could be varnished, or stained. I think the model would then look a bit more realistic, The cateyes, which are a part of the photo-etched bulwarks, have a tendency to snap off as you bend them to shape. And I think that the tabs that fold up to become part of the hinge for the masts may have the same issue. I'm thinking seriously of gluing a little block of wood to them, to give them a bit more strength. I really don't want them breaking as I'm trying to erect the masts inside the bottle! And the supplied transom doesn't fit properly. So I'll start on the masts etc, which I have been playing with. I intend to make a few minor changes, nothing major, just so that the details look a bit more nautical. Cheers Mick
  3. 6 points
    First off, I'd like to thank you guys of the forum and most of all Daniel Siemens, for all the wonderful knowledge,help and encouragement I've had the pleasure to receive during the undertaking of this build. My hope with this piece meal presentation is that some other novices out there can benefit fro m my particular experience in some way. So here we go. In almost every way this build incorporates techniques and processes I've never tried before and only became aware of through the pages of this forum and discussions with Daniel. Along the way I had to contrive some methods to get things done, some of which I'll share here. As I was going along I also found myself tearing things down and starting over again and again because I did something that wasn't going to work and had to fix that, testing my patients all the while. After a two month period of time working most every day on it, I came up with a, I think, pretty decent generic brigantine that I basically modeled after this silhouette. I had never built a SIB model with more than one square sail on it before so I've been itching for years now to get to that place where I could confidently build square riggers. For the most part, the majority of the dozen or so SIBs I built years ago were schooners or sloops of one kind or another. MY FIRST CLAY SEA MATERIAL: I decided earl on after looking at some of the seas in pictures on this forum that I was going to use clay for my sea instead of what I had been using which was blue RTV silicone. Here's a picture of what my seas use to look like. I read everything I could find on the forum that addressed sea material, which is quite a lot actually. With some further input from you guys, I finally decided to go with a PLASTALINA type clay made by VAN AKEN. After working with the stuff throughout the course of this adventure I've decided that I love it. I made a really nice sea for my ship. I also found out that it melted easily over my stove burner to fuse well to the bottom and sides of the bottle. An incidental discovery with this material was that if you expose the top surface of this clay once it's in the bottle under the close light of two 100 watt shaded trouble lights, the glass will heat up and after a while the surface of the clay takes on a satin like wet look which I think is SWEET. I can't tell you how long that process took for sure or how hot the glass got. I do know that it became apparent to me that the sea was getting shinny around the time I had been working inside the bottle on the rigging for about a couple of hours. About the 100 watt trouble lights. I like to work with as much light as close as possible to whatever I'm working on. In this scenario I had a light on the right side and a light on the left side about four inches away from the bottle. I'll certainly be utilizing this characteristic that this clay exhibits when heated from above on my next build, too. HOW I MIXED MY SEA COLOR: I made a sampling chart of the five different clay colors that I purchased to come up with the color I chose for this ships sea. I've put all the combinations of clay that I mixed on a stick and numbered them 1 through 11. To this I've attached a print out of the picture of their proportions before mixing for future reference. I'm sure I will want to use a range of sea color possibilities in the future. I know that there are far more combinations I could have mixed but for now these 11 will suffice. SIZING THINGS UP: I've always liked the Pinch bottle 5th and the way a ship looks in it. It's kinda dreamy looking to me and so I chose it for this build. Besides I had one on hand I've been dragging around for eons. LOL. I basically scaled up a drawing of the ship from the silhouette I found on line. I made a hull blank and put it inside the bottle, held that drawing up to the glass to get a good idea of how much of the bottle would fill up with ship. Although I didn't know it at the time that I did my sizing process, Daniel has a much more accurate way to do it in his tutorial on, "How to build a Bermuda sloop (for beginners)", which you can find on this forum under the menu selection called, Build Logs. Check it out! A great deal of what I have come to do on this build of mine is a direct reflection of the things I've learned from his tutorial. Anyway somewhere in the beginning of his tutorial he shows how he makes a paper cutout of the ship and puts that cutout inside the bottle. Wish I knew how to put a link to his tutorial right here but I don't so you'll have to look it up. It's a treasure trove of technique and process for sure. THREAD BLOCKS: Yet another first for me is this thing called a thread block. There's a nice video on Daniel's tutorial by a guy named John Fox III, that shows how to make them. I had never known about them before and how useful they are especially in doing the running rigging for square sails. I made some the way John shows in the video and also came up with another way to put them on the end of my yards which was easier for me. I was also introduced to the Cow Hitch that is used on the center of the yard to attach it to the mast allowing the yard to pivot around. Between these two concepts, it dawned on me how I would be able to rotate the sails out of the way to get them through the neck of the bottle and because the running rigging freely passes through both thread block on the ends of the yard I would be able to set the tack of the sails once everything was inside the bottle.Pretty neat. Basically I made my thread blocks for the yards by holding a piece of wire in my vice. I secured the yard to the wire with a piece of masking tape being mindful of the correct orientation of where the Cow Hitch was and where the blocks needed to be. I made a mark on the wire where I wanted the block located from the end of the yard. That way I could duplicate the same location on the other side. When one thread block was done I slid it off the wire, flipped the yard 180 then put it back on the wire and tied the other one. PAPER SAILS AND SPANKER: Okay for the first time I'm using paper sails too. In the past all my builds had cloth sails because I had always had a problem with kinking paper going down the neck. Fabric was much more compliant for me. Another thing that I gleaned from Daniels, process was that the spanker sail has to come way away from the mast in order to get through the neck and unscathed. In my case I made a yolk crutch to wrap around the mast for the end of the boom out of a piece of brass wire. I drilled a hole through the mast at the spot where the boom would be nesting. Then I made two wire blocks and tied them to the boom.The running rigging for the spanker sail's sheeting goes through them and the hole then forward all the way out of the bottle.This configuration worked out perfectly for me as the gaff was able to move way out of the way along with the boom when the time came. So no kinked spanker. Incidentally, the travelers you see in my pictures are "Mini Swing Line Stapler", staples. I've used them on almost every ship I've made for that purpose. Sometimes I put a radius on them. On this build I also used four of them to attach my rat lines and back stays onto. Ironically, using the staples this way would later save my ass , as you will shortly come to see. LESSON LEARNED These pictures show a couple of things. The first thing that is evident, (to you old salts anyway), is that my ratlines and back stays are too far forward of the center line of the mast to ever lay down flat. When the time came to fold down the masts and I discovered that they wouldn't lay down I almost had a heart attack. Disaster! At one time I must have known about the importance of these elements locations relative to the pivot point of the mast because all my builds were successful in the past in this regard. But over the years I just totally forgot about it. Anyway, after a while of total dismay and a whiny conversation with Daniel, it came to me that I could remove the staples that the ratlines and back stays were attached to and relocate them back and up. That solved the problem and is an example of one of the tear downs I was speaking about in the beginning of this discourse. I wasn't able to get those lines as tight as they were and that's a huge disappointment. Another thing that the pictures show is the way I chose to step the masts. In the past I always used the wire hing method but this time I decided to use clock bearings. These bearings are put in old clocks when the original bearings are worn oval over time. It just so happens that I also restore antique clocks for a hobby too and have these bearings on hand.The one side of the bearing has a counter sink on it to hold oil for a gears pinion shaft. that counter sink was mounted up so the mast with a rounded bottom nested in the countersink just fine. In the future I'm just going to drill a divot on my deck to do this . it's a lot less work. SECURING THE SHIP IN THE BOTTLE: I put a trough in the middle of my sea material and found some of that white 5 minute epoxy at Home depot that Daniel had spoken about somewhere on the forum. Can't remember where but anyway it worked out great. There was a little bit of it that oozed up around the hull but I covered that up with white clay to look like the wake of a ship moving through the water. SETTING MY SAILS TACK INSIDE THE BOTTLE: I'm sure that there is some way to avoid what I had to do to come to the point of sail I wanted for my ship but as yet I don't know that. Basically I made my sea to reflect a reaching tack which meant that everything had to be adjusted from how it was built outside the bottle for that tack inside the bottle. For the boom and gaff of the spanker sail I used a piece of wood to lean against the top end of the gaff which held it there while the CA glue dried. I pushed the boom out with a wire tool and tightened the sheeting of the sail from outside the bottle. At this point I glued the yolk and sheeting line off with CA. Then I went in with a razor on a wire and cut the sheeting line off at the front of the mast where it came out of the hole. ADJUSTING THE YARDS: To pull the yards over for the reach tack I made a slip knot lasso and used that to grab the outside end of the yard arm and pull it forward careful all the while that the running rigging was moving through the thread blocks on either side of the yard arm without hanging up. Worked like a charm. I then went in and touched the Cow Hitch at the mast with some CA glue to set it. I waited a minute before I let go of the tension on the lasso I was using to hold the yards position.To be doubly sure the sail would stay put I removed the lasso and touched the outside thread block where the running rigging touched it with the CA glue. The only problem with this process aside from being tedious is that it is difficult to get all the yards on both masts to have the same degree of angle when it's all said and done. There's got to be a better way to do this, I mean to have the tack of all the sails predetermined before it goes in the bottle? Perhaps some of you guys can pipe in on this issue? One other thing that I learned about CA glue is it will for sure fog up the inside of your bottle if you use a lot of glue like I did inside. So best, if you can turn the bottle up to let the off gasses from the glue escape better. Even so be prepared to spend hours inside with Windex and a piece of cloth scrubbing the glass clean again. Big Pain In The Ass. Better yet plan the build to use a minimal amount of glue inside. SUMMING UP: There are a whole lot of more topics I could have touched on in this discourse but If I go on about it, it's kinda like someone saying , I could write a book. So I'm leaving it here. I sure learned a great deal during this build doing things for the first time was daunting in some respects but I survived the fray. I'd also like to say that it sure is nice to have a place like this to share our projects with other like minded nut cases because let's face it no average person on the planet has a clue about the work we do creating these little engineering marvels. There is so much to learn in this wonderful medium and I'm excited about the future builds I'm dreaming of already. Great to have my feet wet again. Thanks for reading mate. Best regards Bruce.
  4. 6 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    I then stained the deck with normal household wood stain and painted the hull with regular Testers model paint. Added a toothpick Bowsprit, a dolphin spanker made from a straight pin, and a toothpick spritsail yard. I let the spritsail yard pivot on the dolphin spanker for placement in the bottle. I drilled holes in the side rail for the 20 deck cannons, but found I cold not make the cannons small enough to fit through the holes, so I cut them into notches. I made the deck cannons out of little chips of bass wood and brass wire, but I had a heck of a time gluing them together and getting the paint to look decent. I know there are a few other methods on this site to make better looking cannons that I'll try next time. I made the other deck furniture from small bits of wood and wire and glued them to the deck. I made the golden eagle figurehead from the foil from a wine bottle. I added the martingale stays and the other lines on the bowsprit for which I used regular sewing thread, which I used for all my lines. I added the chainplates out of strips of coffee stirrers, which was the start of my downfall, because by now the width of my ship was almost 20mm, and my bottle neck was 19.5mm. more on that later. My masts and yards were all toothpicks. I think I tried using bamboo skewers towards the end. Straight pins for the trucks on top of the masts. I used various methods to attach the yards to the masts, but none of them gave me the movement I needed to pivot the yards parallel to the masts for insertion, mostly because I insisted on building the tops and cross trees on the masts. The method that seemed to work the best for attaching the yards was to use thread and make a cow hitch in the middle of the yard, then pass both ends of the thread through a hole drilled in the mast and wrap both thread ends around the mast and knot them, then hit it all of it with a drop of glue to secure everything. I saw a method of making thread blocks on another post that I'm anxious to try, but for this one I just drilled holes with my pin vise in the yard ends for the running rigging to pass through. I drilled the holes before I tapered the ends of the yards. I had a heck of a time getting all the holes to face the same direction on each yard, (some ending up parallel to the water line, some parallel to the masts) which caused me some problems during rigging. I'll need to come up with some sort of jig in the future. I had a hard time getting the ratlines attached to the shrouds in an even way. I ended up stiffening some thread with glue and letting the dry, then cutting the thread into short lengths, gluing them to the shrouds with super glue while the shrouds were on the masts, and clipping the ends with cuticle clippers. I'd be happy to hear any hints on a better way of doing that.
  5. 6 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    I glued 2 coffee stirrers end to end and drew the transom markings with a marker. This bled a lot and could have come out better. I attached the transom and carved it to fit, and that complete the hull.
  6. 6 points
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    A bit more progress, Alan, I agree, the photo etched masts look a bit odd. I'v never seen a sailing boat with flat spars. I glued some half round styrene strip to the masts, boom, gaffs and bowsprit, and painted them brown. They seem to turn out OK. Cheers Mick ps, the camera shoes up a multitude of sins!!!
  7. 5 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    Hi everyone. I've been a member on this site for a few years but rarely post. This build log is going to be for only my second ship, the Mirny. I built my first ship three years ago with moderate success. So of course, emboldened with beginners hubris, my second build was way way way too ambitious. This is a tale of a shipwreck, a salvage, and a relaunch. I know how the story ends because I was too afraid to write this log until it was complete, in case it was a total flop. I found these drawing on the internet, printed them out and scaled them with a set of calipers. I think the scale ended up being about 1:480. The hull ended up being about 75mm long and 18mm wide, and 210mm from the waterline to the top of the main mast. I carved the hull out of a small piece of bass wood, mostly free hand. I think I went through 3 or 4 blocks before I got a shape I was happy with
  8. 5 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    I made the decking by taking a bunch of wooden coffee stirrers, coloring the flat side black with a magic marker and gluing a bunch of them together, The black that seeped into the wood was just enough to look like the caulking between the boards. I glued this to the top of my hull and sanded it down about a millimeter or 2, and carved it back so there was a small lip on top of the hull. I then took a full width coffee stirrer, wet in and bend it and glued it on top of that lip to make the gunwales.
  9. 5 points
    Hull. Did bulwarks and gun ports but looked so hideous I removed them and sanded down. Rethinking.
  10. 5 points
    New to forum, I got into the hobby back in the late 1970"s buying my first kit from Model Expo in NJ. I met Mr. Frank Mastini there, and ended up becoming a student of his. I recently retired and am now getting back into ship building. Currently started a Mamoli Alabama, and an old Authentic models kit Princess Royal Ship in a Bottle, which I picked up at the Disney World Souvenir shop outside the Pirates of the Caribbean Ride. Totally different feel from building a plank on frame, I find it more enjoyable & relaxing, not to mention a lot smaller mess & footprint to deal with. Looking forward to tips & tricks & checking out your Bottle builds! Thanks Lobo
  11. 5 points
    Jeff B

    1776 Lexington, Continental Brig of War

    The Gunnels are on, top rails on. I did a bottleneck fit check. It was a "cork." I just finished trimming and sanding. It fits now. Back to the paint shop. J.
  12. 4 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    To attache the jibs and still let them slide on the jib stays, I pre-punctured small holes on the luff edge of the jib with a pin and sewed them onto the jib stays with sewing thread. Flags were again typing paper folded around the main truck or the stay. I had a hard time keeping track of all the lines, so I numbered and lettered them and wedged them into slots cut into paperboard which was tacked to my stand, each slot labeled with the line number/letter. Later I resorted to taping little paper flags to the end of each line with the proper letter/number, but this made it very hard to untangle the lines once the got crossed up. I'll have to find a better method, or more likely, not have more than 10 or 20 lines!
  13. 4 points
    DSiemens

    Large Lighthouse

    I like the concept. The illusion comes from the differences in the size of the bottle neck and opening in comparison to the size of the object in the bottle. So what your looking for is that the finished lighthouse is larger than the opening. This requires splitting the light house into pieces and reconstructing those pieces in the bottle. That process get's tricky and there's no one way to do it. I have seen some people that take the finished project and cut it into pieces and reassemble it in the bottle. I think thats a difficult method. The problem with cutting a finished piece is the saw often cuts out something like a half milometer or less and the pieces don't come together perfectly leaving a seam, which detracts from the illusion. In bottle art every millimeter counts. The other method is to build separate individual pieces that are fit together by pegs or magnets or string. When finished these pieces will fit in the bottle neck individually, come together in the bottle and have little to no seam lines and as a whole be bigger than the bottle neck. If I were starting out on this I'd do a bottle with two pieces fit together with pegs. Once I got the hang of that branch out to four pieces. There are ways with ships in bottles to hide seem lines when spitting a hull to fit a ship in a bottle. For instance using the channels to cover up the split places making the hull seamless. I'd have to study light houses to find similar lines where seams could be hid. Look for that though. A lot of lighthouses have a wider top and a seam could be hid where the base and top come together. Another method maybe applying paint over seams ones the light house is in the bottle. That can get really tricky but it's not impossible. I would look at things like houses built in bottles or steamboats. We have a couple build logs that did something like that. Arturs build is a good example.
  14. 4 points
    Finally recovered the mishap. Drilled my gun ports and notched out the top rails. Im glad the days of bending Popsicle sticks and flat toothpicks are behind me.
  15. 4 points
    Jeff B

    What's on your workbench?

    I found these plans for the Continental brig Lexington 1776, in the back of a file folder. The hull resembles a Bermuda sloop- with raised gunnels. 8 guns per side (oh joy!). There is a photo of it in the same bottle I used last. A 1960's Log Cabin Syrup. I found a couple online. Here we go...again.
  16. 3 points
    tazam0827

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    I was concerned that with the placement of the lifeboats, capstan, hatches and the cabin, and with the mast tops and cross trees, I wouldn't be able to fold the masts down flat to get it through the bottle neck if I used a wire hinge for the masts. I made the mistake of on the main mast and fore mast, trying to use the method of making a divot in the deck and a line from the bottom of the mast through a hole in the center of the divot to pull the mast into place. I planned to completely separate those 2 masts completely from the hull and putting them in the bottle separately, after inserting the hull with the mizzenmast. This meant that all the standing rigging like the shrouds and the backstays had to be moveable. I ended up with around 67 separate threads that had to come out the bottle neck and be managed. It looked great while on the work stand. For the sails I used regular typing paper stained in tea. I made the lines representing the stitch lines by scoring the paper with the point of a needle and a ruler. I made the reefing lines again with regular sewing thread. I wet the paper and bent it around a dowel to give is a little curve.
  17. 3 points
    I soaked the skewers in hot water and left them for a day and a half in the water. I found them much easier to drill. I also put a dab of superglue on the tips prior to drilling the mast top holes and at the mast foot for the hinge, so the wood doesn't crack while drilling.
  18. 3 points
    Today's progress. For lack of nautical term, I made that thing on the front of the bow below the bowsprit by carving the tip of a Popsicle stick. Painted the bowsprit. Drilled hole into that "thing, with a #71 bit. I then cut ran some 3/0 fly tying thread through a chunk of beeswax and tied it around the bowsprit, baking careful note to be sure it matched the plans. I put the knot on the underside and put a drop of cement on it. I then painted the over the line. Twisted the thread together, threaded a needle and passed it through the hole in the "thing", and tied it off, applying cement. Later, I cut the excess line. When there's more me time, I'll paint my 16 gun mounts, in preparation for installation of guns. Baby steps. Thanks for reading, J.
  19. 3 points
    DJCoffman

    Large Lighthouse

    Hello, first time posting here but I'm hoping those of you much more creative and skilled than I can give me some guidance. I am looking to make a light house in a bottle, just a lighthouse. The issue, besides increasing my skills of making it look good, is how to give it an illusion like a ship in a bottle that makes someone unsure how it was made in the bottle. I think this also goes hand in hand with how to make the lighthouse large enough to make it fill the area of the bottle. Any thoughts or ideas will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, -DJ
  20. 3 points
    Cut and shaped a bowsprit from small bamboo skewer. I don't like that at the angle it can't be drilled through the hull, yet it needs to be on to of the rail. In the photo it is drying in place.
  21. 3 points
    MickyK

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Hi Folks, I'm new to this forum, and also new to putting ships into bottles. I bought the Amati kit of the Hannah, and I'm battling on with it. So far, I have built the hull, it is "bread and butter" construction, all quite straight forward. sanded the hull, painted and glued on the photo-etched bulwark. I am thinking of painting the hull with West System epoxy, so as to fill the end-grain of the ply, and using West "fairing filler" to give the hull a nice smooth finish. I have had good results with full size model boats, using this method. There is an excellent set of videos by Gary Renshaw on the web, showing how to build the model, which I am using as an instruction manual! Hopefully, all the more experienced modelers out there might find it of some interest, and hopefully point me in the right direction when I get lost! I'll come back when there is a bit more progress. Cheers Mick
  22. 3 points
    I sanded and repainted. Then decided to cut in with nippers some gun ports. Bad idea. Had to reconstruct. Decided to try to put in cut gunnels one-by-one. They looked good but we're breaking with handling after dry. We all know this hobby has many frustrations and setbacks. Sometimes you gotta walk away, and come back later. I cut everything down to beginning, sanded, and started gunwhales again. Going back to old plan.
  23. 3 points
    Tried bulwarks again. Splitting and slicing Popsicle sticks. "Breaking the grain" for the foc'sle. I layered up the poop deck.There's going to be a dark rail above the gun port wall, then a flared rail above the poop deck. Struggled again with gun ports. I'm gonna practice painting little squares (Plan C). Thanks for reading.
  24. 2 points
    DJCoffman

    Large Lighthouse

    Thank you both for the reply. I don't have a specific lighthouse in mind but it will probably be the traditional shape. I figured pieces that were assembled in the bottle would be the only way to do it, that build link really helps thank you. Now I just have to plan it out and start trying until I get a decent enough product. Thanks again. -DJ
  25. 2 points
    IgorSky

    Large Lighthouse

    Hi DJ! Do you have any idea what kind of lighthouse you want to make? As I assume, it could be some kind of abstract lighthouse or even some specific lighthouse. Usually a lighthouse is presented as a high round tower and a house near it. You can sharpen a tower piece of four pieces of wood that you put together. Each piece must go down the neck of the bottle. You can make a simulation of the masonry and then it will be easier to hide the joints of the lighthouse details. I think you can even insert an LED, a battery and a control unit into it. Best Regards! Igor.
  26. 2 points
    Jesse Lee: Thanks so much. My hope has been fulfilled. Somebody got something out of my experience that they can utilize in the future. You never know where these things might go and that's why after much hesitance on my part, I decided I should through my hat in the ring and contribute what I could. Glad I did now. As far as getting back to it, well that's something we all struggle with, I think anyway. Look at me for example 35 plus years absents. I guess there is a point you stop trying to get back to it and it just remains one of those bucket list goals. It doesn't matter how long it takes to get back at it. Because you love it so much it will find it's way back to you. Trust me. I'm old. I know stuff. LOL. regards B.
  27. 2 points
    Gwyl Blaser

    Bottle find

    Nice bottle. I like those thin bottles. It increases the challenge and the WOW factor is also enhanced. Gwyl
  28. 2 points
    Welcome Aboard!
  29. 2 points
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Greetings Bill, Thanks for the kind words! The bottle in this case is a sodium vapor light bulb, which obscures very little of the detail of the model. Don't be discouraged, my first 3 ship in bottle models ended up in the trash can. Remember we ALL start at the same place, it takes time and practice and a desire to increase one's detail level and accuracy. It doesn't happen overnight! <Grin> I've been working on miniature model sailing ships for nearly 40 years, talk to me after you've been at it that long and we will see how you've progressed, if I am around that long! <Grin> Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  30. 2 points
    Lubber123

    What's on your workbench?

    Hi Jeff, the Brig Lexington is extensively covered in Charles G Davis "The Built Up Ship Model", which I think can still be found. I built a SIB version back in 1980 for a wedding gift for a cousin which I considered my best best work. I put it in a very unique "Rock n Rye" bottle which has a oversized neck and a nice rectangular shape with a nicely scrolled neck. I've wanted to recreate one for a while and have had a carved up and painted hull sitting on a rigging board for some years. Unfortunately I didn't make a water line hull and the full hull is a bit much for most bottles so I can't decide what to do with my oversized hull. I was thinking of making a miniature in a glass box instead. Maybe. Anyway once in a while I try to transcribe the dimensions from the book plan to a smaller scale so that I can complete the masts and spars, etc. It's on the back burner. The SIB plan for the future and might always will be. Thanks for the inspiration.
  31. 2 points
    Nice work, Jeff! Thank you very much! With best regards, Igor.
  32. 2 points
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Greetings Alan, Here are some photos of the design method for my insertion stick. They are of two different models, but same concept. The last photo shows the clamping head, made from a base that slides onto the main stick portion, with a divider to separate lines port/starboard plus bow, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd mast. The top of the slider portion has a rubber pad on top and a second wood piece also has the same on the bottom, cut from an old inner tube. Sometimes I use clothes pins to clamp the lines between, sometimes just a tightly tied and knotted string. The head can slide onto the stick, but has a small screw on the bottom to old it in place when tightening the lines. This construction allows the head to be used for many different models. The stick portion is made especially for each model, the head can slide onto any of them. The main features of the sticks is they are narrow enough to allow access to the lines along the outside of the bottom of the upper hull, plus cut out openings to allow access to the lines amidship, access is for applying glue to the tightened lines, and for cutting the lines. They also have holes to match the pegs on the underside of the upper hulls, to hold the hull in place. A line around the upper hull and stick keep the model attached to the stick, and is cut after the lines are tightened and glued. The sticks also have wire half hoops attached to the sides, to keep the lines separated and in positions that hold the tightened lines "just right" to allow good gluing access as well. The first photo shows the underside of the hull, with the openings for gluing easily apparent, the middle photo shows the same, though one has to look closely as I didn't rotate the model and stick for that photo. Hope that helps! Anchor's A Weigh! John
  33. 1 point
    Bernard Kelly

    Mirny, shipwreck and salvage

    Looking good Tazam. Hope it all turned out ok.
  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
    Wow, that looks nice! Thanks for showing your color combinations with the clay. That will help me out on future builds (if I can ever get back to it) Jesse
  36. 1 point
    Congratulations Bruce. A very nice job.
  37. 1 point
    Welcome.
  38. 1 point
    Welcome, Lobo!
  39. 1 point
    Welcome Lobo!
  40. 1 point
    Thanks Jeff and Dan.
  41. 1 point
    John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Thanks! I never was one to think inside the box. I am always trying to think of ways to minimize the difficult parts of our shared passion, sometimes it actually works! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  42. 1 point
    exwafoo

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Many thanks John. Much appreciated. I'll certainly think about having a go with this technique. Keeping the lines in order during launching and holding the SIB once inside have given me issues in the past. Best regards Alan
  43. 1 point
    Chasseur

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Congrats John a fantastic build and model. 1st Prize* for ingenuity and design!
  44. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Hannah, an Amati kit

    Nice job. I won one of these kits at convention. Got the hull done, I found this messy to glue up as the glue mixed with the soot lefet over from the laser cut pieces. I am seriously considering making a replacement set of masts and spars, as I think the flat photo etch ones will look somewhat strange. Its on hold at the moment while I do other things. I'll load some phots when done. Alan
  45. 1 point
    Sometime in mid April, I began to build my first SIB in nearly 40 years. Although I had several older books on the subject to reference, I was curious to see what U-tube had on it about the subject and that's when I discovered this forum. Glad I did as there is wealth of information and apparently a lot of great guys contributing to this wonderful spot on the net. I love seeing the other builds and soaking up the combined techniques you guys have so willingly shared. Some of which I've employed in my recent build. What a place to grow with in this art form. Good on you. I'm a mostly retired research and development process guy at a German Based machine tool manufacturer specializing in extreme precision geometry of all sorts. I've spent a couple of decades looking through a microscope there so wearing magnifying glasses is second nature to me in many respects. I also have been restoring antique clocks for a long time. A fascinating hobby I just adore. I'm seventy years old now and have an adoring wife who somehow has managed to put up with my creative juices all these years. That's a big plus for me. We have three great kids the last one is midway through collage on his way to becoming a Dr. of Chiropractic. We live on a small Lake about forty miles north of Detroit Michigan. When I was a younger man I did a lot of sailing all around the Great Lakes and have owned several boats in those years. I'm looking forward to getting to know all of you and hopefully I'll be able to contribute to the forum here and there along the way. So that's my bit. Happy to be a member of Bottled Ship builders. Steady as she goes and regards from Bruce Foxworthy
  46. 1 point
    Onni

    What's on your workbench?

    'Viggen' (Thunderbolt) Cabin cruiser.
  47. 1 point
    cog

    Hello From Holland

    Finally took the time to subscribe. Only took me a few years. I love the SIBs I see here and at MSW where some of you folks may know me from. I might even try my hand at a large version of a bottled ship. But first things first: finish my current plastic & PE builds.
  48. 1 point
    DSiemens

    How do you make ratlines?

    The forum is very slow but not dead. There are a ton of different ratline methods. I've seen people use lace, or even photo etching. There's good and bad to all methods. I agree that lace or screening doesn't look the best and metal being hard is harder to get into the bottle. I haven't tried all the methods but I can tell you what works well for me. There's two parts ratlines and it maybe obvious but I'll point them out just so every one understands my terminology. The lines connecting the mast to the ship and run more or less vertically are called shrouds. The lines that work as ladders and run horizontally are called ratlines. Since I usually use the folding method the tightness of the shrouds is important for setting the rake or angle of the mast. So while some builders make their shrouds and ratlines separate and add them on to the ship after the two parts are combined, I put the shrouds on first then add the ratlines. I like to make my shrouds with a single line weaving back and forth from the ship to the mast. This makes tightening easy since I pull the line and move the mast back and forth to tighten the shrouds. Once the shrouds are tightened I tie down and glue down the last line. Then I move on to the ratlines. With the mast pulled forward and shrouds tight I glue on the ratlines. This can be done one by one or you can use a frame. Place the frame between the mast on the shrouds and glue the ratlines to the shrouds. I've used superglue and white glue. Both work fine. I will say superglue dries stiff so try not to use to much. Also if you get to much on the line it may leave a white blob. These can be painted over if needed. If you use white glue try using the frame to keep the lines in place while the glue dries. That tends to work well. Test the lines once the glue is dry to make sure they are secure. Then cut off the excess with follicle clippers. I describe this method in more detail in my Bermuda sloop build log and there is more pictures.
  49. 1 point
    Lubber123

    Trio in a Triangle Bottle

    I’ve been continuing to follow the examples in Jack Needham’s “Modeling Ships in Bottles”. I had already finished the first example “A Simple Model for Beginners”. Although I am more experienced than a basic beginner, I found making the basic model to be a good refresher. I don’t follow Needham’s method of rigging; I don’t use as many control lines as he suggests and I rig the shrouds in to holes in the gunnels instead of rigging them through the underside of the hull. Here I progressed to his second model, a four masted lumber schooner. I had the dilemma of trying to find an appropriate bottle for it since the model is long but not very tall. I also had a uniquely shaped bottle that my father had saved for me many years ago with the thought that “maybe you could put a ship in it someday”. It’s a long tapered triangle shaped bottle that once contained Sicilian Gold Marsala. So as a tribute to my Sicilian ancestry I wanted to use the bottle. I switched over from the clay-dough modeling clay I had previously used and instead purchased some plumber’s putty that I colored with water-soluble artist grade oil paints mixing Ultramarine Blue with some Viridian Green for the sea, using the base neutral color for the wave tops. I also switched back to cloth sails which I seem to prefer. Once I placed the lumber schooner into the back end of the bottle, I realized it looked a little lonely so I repeated Needham’s “Exercise One” and made a basic two masted fishing schooner to keep it company. Once I added the fishing schooner, I still had some “dead space” in the neck to fill so I added a small headland background with a few buildings and put a small skipjack sailboat in front of that to give the illusion of all three running into port. I finished the neck with a “Turk’s Head” knot that I built a special jig for so I could get it right this time. It’s still tough to make, even with a jig. So here is my diorama “fleet” heading into port. This is the first time I put multiple ships in a bottle and I’m encouraged enough to use this method again on some of my longer bottles.
  50. 1 point
    DavidB773

    Flags.

    For the single SIB I’ve completed, I drew the American flag on both sides of a single piece of paper then folded it in half. Used red and blue ink. Folded, the size is about 2 mm x 3 mm. I’m pretending that there are 38 stars in the field on this 1881 flag.
×
×
  • Create New...