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  1. 10 points
    Artur

    Constitutionen

    Continuation Artur
  2. 8 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    There are the two (port and starboard) 5 inch pivot gun bases which will be on the Poop deck. They are indicated by the arrow. I made these simply by cutting a couple of wooden beads in half.
  3. 7 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    Moving on to constructing the armoured embrasures. Took a lot of measuring and trail and error before I was satisfied with them.
  4. 7 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    'The early bird catches the worm' or in this case the ship.Got a bit fed up with making the hull for the minute so had a go at the figure head or is it figure bird?😉
  5. 7 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    As HMS Gannet is mostly white ( a unforgiving colour for a model ship) I am using white plastic (styrene) to skin the hull. Made up some paper templates to try for size and fit.Drilled out portholes,anchor hawse and gun ports and then glued to the hull. Hoping to just to have one split in the hull to fit through the bottle neck but its looking like I may have to split it in four pieces as the neck opening is only 29 mm wide.
  6. 7 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    Made a start. Had to patch some wood that I had together as she will be 22,5 cm long (9 " approx). Luckily a book on HMS Gannet has just been published so I am using it for reference...
  7. 6 points
    exwafoo

    Pirate type Galleon

    My 1p worth that may help. These are from the Black Pearl plans I drew up. I did not use them all in the end. Alan rigging.pdf
  8. 6 points
    DSiemens

    Pirate type Galleon

    Here's a rigging plan that's very similar to your ship. There's a lot of different way to rig a ship in a bottle. One of my favorite techniques to use in rigging I learned from John Fox III. It's called the thread block. Here's a link to the video on it. Basically it's tying a string around a needle to create a small loop and then gluing the knot so the loop doesn't close. These loops can be used all over the ship to run lines through. The alternative to this is seed beads. They are bigger than thread blocks but as you've seen from the other photo's you've found they do work well. When I'm not going for a super crazy accurate look on running rigging I take a simplified approach. There's three parts lifts, clew lines and sheets/braces. The lifts which run from the tip of the yardarm to the mast I think are optional. Some sibs have them, many more don't. I think they look nice but including them is up to you. To rig them in the bottle I use a thread block attached to the mast above the yard arm. I then tie a line to the end of the yard thread it through the block and tie it to the other end of the yard. The yard should still be able to turn almost parallel to the mast even with this line in place. That makes it possible to insert it into the bottle and there's not a lot of messing with the lift once it's in. Just adjust the yard and if needed put a dab of glue on the thread block to keep it all in place. Clew lines are attached to the end of the yard arm and have a block on them. The braces run from the hull through the clue lines and back to the hull. These are typically used on the bigger yard arms. Note the smaller yard arms higher on the mast don't have clew lines. This is where a thread block or seed bead comes in handy. Attach a line to the end of the yard that has a thread block or seed bead on the end. Sheets typically run towards the back of the ship. This is advantageous to the folding method since the lines can be put in place and as the masts fold backwards the lines become loose and then tighten up as the masts are pulled up into place. This does require a lot of testing though. Typically the sheets running through the clew lines run farther back on the ship and can be glued down to the hull. The sheets in the upper yards are trickier. On a real ship these lines often run to the fore stays and then down to pin rails on deck or on the bulwarks. That is hard to replicate on a ship in bottle. The simpler method is to run them to the mast aft of the yard arms. Older ships in bottles would drill a hole in the mast and run a line through it similar to what I explained with the lifts. If done right you can still fold the masts back using this method. I use a similar method except I tie a thread block to the mast. drilling holes in the mast makes them weaker and risks a break. Tying a thread block gives the same effect with out effecting the integrity of the mast. You can also run the sheets so they run out of the bottle and can be tightened after the ship is in. It depends on what you want to accomplish and how you design the ship to fold and unfold. Another method I use is to get a paint brush bristle and glue it to the end of the yard so that it just touches the mast behind that yard or vise versa. Once the ship is in you can glue the other end in place. Look at my build of the Scavenger as an example. I hope this helps. Ask more questions if needed.
  9. 5 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    Checking the height for the masts and seeing what it looks like with the bowsprit.
  10. 5 points
    Next part is the windlass. The windlass is used to haul anchors and other heavy things on and of the ship. Breaking it down the simplest form is two triangles and a cylinder. Glue those right on deck just behind the bowsprit. Also another couple small pieces. I put in a couple rectangular pieces one just behind the bowsprit and one on the bowsprit. Looking at the photo of the other model it looks like theres a block on a stand just behind the bowsprit and a ships bell on the bowsprit. I did a ships bell this small on the Scavenger but being a beginners build I thought a rectangle on the bowsprit would work. I'll put a dot of gold paint where the bell goes. From here I need to add cannons and then start on masts and rigging.
  11. 4 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    Having visited Chatham Historic Dockyard in the UK a couple of years ago I thought that it would be nice to model HMS Gannet in a large 3 liter bottle which I found in a junk shop(thrift store).Here are a few of the photographs that I took.
  12. 4 points
    To make sure I have the right spacing for the bowsprit and the windlass I'm putting the bowsprit in next. I cut a notch in the front bulwarks to get the angle of the bowsprit according to the plans. I glue the bowsprit in the notch and to the deck. I'm not worried about the bowsprit being pulled up by the rigging because of the bobstay. The bobstay runs from the bowsprit to the stem. As the bowsprit is pulled up the bobstay pulls it back and creates a fulcrum. As the end of the bowsprit is pulled up the end attached to the hull will be pushed down. In order to attach a bobstay to a stem I gotta have a stem. Starting out I round out a piece of wood to match the hull. I cut the top to match the angle of the bowsprit then round out what will be the front of the stem. Little more sanding to shape it and the stem is good to go. I'm not doing the bobstay just yet but its something to keep in mind.
  13. 4 points
    Time to add in the bilge pumps. Basically this piece. Breaking this down its a cylinder with a handle on top. First I drilled a couple holes. That ensures they aren't going anywhere. I like to use booboo scewers on round objects particularly masts and yards. Its a sturdy material and it works well pulling through a draw plate. Another great method is putting the scewer into a drill and turning it until its smaller. I don't suggest turning in a Dremel though. Dremels turn to fast which makes bamboo into a projectile. Drills are slower and more controlled. Once I have the skewers whittled down I cut off a piece and glue it in making sure they are the right hieght. The handle I make out of a paint brush bristle. Its thin and stays straight. A little black paint gives it a good look. Glue it on at an angle to look like the handle is sitting at rest.
  14. 4 points
    John Fox III

    Pirate type Galleon

    Greetings All, Here is a zipped file of an incomplete rigging primer I started. I only got through most of the standing rigging, but it might be helpful. The article is written as though it were a web page, i.e. you unzip the files into a folder, then use whatever internet browser you normally use to open/view the .html file in that folder. I tried to explain the "why's" for individual lines in general terms that can be applied to most modeling situations. Also, while modeling methods and desires vary by person, the way I look at rigging, and many other ship parts and pieces, is to use a scaled print and photographs or paintings, if available, to look at what you can actually see. If I can see certain items, including rigging, on a scaled drawing or image, then I add it to my models. Running rigging is also useful to maneuver yards/booms/gaffs/etc. into proper final position without reaching inside the bottle with a tool that might cause damage to some other parts of the model. It does add more "control" lines, those operated from outside the bottle, I prefer that method to using tools to do the work inside the bottle. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III Rigging Primer.zip
  15. 3 points
    James w rogers

    Undecided!

    Decided to go drop anchor, quite pleased with it in the end.😁
  16. 3 points
    Chasseur

    HMS Wivern by Chausseur

    So here is an update on the HMS Wivern Located what I could find off of the Internet regarding a deck plan view and couldn’t find anything on a half breadth plan nor sheer. Next, the best thing was to make an actual half hull model of the ship. I had to scale down and then cut each sheer (starting with the bow) to gather appropriate templates to carve the hull out of some red cedar. I also rebuilt the end of the socket. I turned latter on my mini-lathe out of some cherry hardwood I had kicking around. The last picture shows the socket on the light bulb and it fits perfectly. Pictures of the process…!
  17. 2 points
    Onni

    HMS Gannet

    Thanks Mike. Yes I used single pieces either side. They are 0.5 mm thick so I can bend them easily. The real Gannet has a wooden hull but that is too much effort for me to replicate. Would of been nice to model a full hull but the height inside the bottle doesn't allow for that.
  18. 2 points
    Chasseur

    Pirate type Galleon

    Excellent pics and Video by John. All... if you guys have a technique or modeling ideas to share please do not hesitate to send me a quick email with them in a word or PDF document so we can share them this December in our Bottled ShipWright Journal. I will ensure to insert the link to John's video in the journal. This is the kind of stuff I am looking for. P.S. the journal will be free and please hit the clubs tab next to the Leader Board near the top of the page to join. See attached snip! Jeff
  19. 2 points
    exwafoo

    Proportional Dividers

    All, I made these a few years ago and produced this article for Bottleship. I've used them for about 5 years until I found a set at a good price on ebay when an architect's office was closing down. They are of great benefit when scaling up (or down) plans, especially when the plan is in a book near the centre and the book cannot be flattened for photocopying. The cheat's way is at the end of the article. Best Alan Proportional Dividers Kind Of.pdf
  20. 2 points
    DavidB773

    Flags.

    For the single SIB I’ve completed, I drew the American flag on both sides of a single piece of paper then folded it in half. Used red and blue ink. Folded, the size is about 2 mm x 3 mm. I’m pretending that there are 38 stars in the field on this 1881 flag.
  21. 1 point
    DSiemens

    Undecided!

    Looks great. Awesome job.
  22. 1 point
    exwafoo

    Sailing Stories

    Long, long ago, in the summer of '76, as I had just finished my RN Artificer apprenticeship, I was volunteered to crew a Bosun Dinghy in the annual 'Engineers Regatta' where RN Engineers from different RN Training Establishments gathered to display their collective lack of seamanship in Portsmouth Harbour. We were launching the thing on a hard on the Gosport side, which entailed getting it off the trailer into the water (no problem) , stepping the mast and rigging it. The mast was swung upright, and for some reason that still escapes me, I was required to hold the bow (chest deep) while the 'skipper' did up shackles etc. The next thing I know is that I am being pulled out into the harbour by 'something' that was gripping me by the neck. I couldn't breathe or shout, and things were turning black when there was a lot of shouting (involving some exceptionally colourful language), hands grabbed me, the 'something' was unwound, and I was pulled gasping into the rescue boat. I got my wind back, discovered what had happened and joined in the use of the colourful language. What had happened was this; two members of the Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS), (now fully integrated into the RN) had finished rigging their Bosun next to us and set sail. I will say nothing sexist about it being a good idea to have a look round, check things are secure and ship shape before casting off, however none of this was done as they left a rope trailing which wrapped around my neck and shanghied me as unwilling 'crew', or in this case as a sea anchor, the effect of which was unnoticed by the WRNS until the safety boat crew, alerted by my skipper, turned up to the rescue. They were towed back to the hard and told never to darken the sea again. I was told to get back in the Bosun and race - and by the use of a bit of gamesmanship involving not doing a penalty 360 that wasn't spotted we came third. Never sailed since. Alan
  23. 1 point
    When I want a thin stripe to stick on, I sometimes use a length of old video tape! It is extremely thin. If the surface is roughened slightly with fine wire wool, you can spray it any colour you want. Tape it to a piece of scrap acrylic, and after painting, slice the strip off with a scalpel. Bob
  24. 1 point
    I like the idea of wood for this kind of detail. An alternative is paper - standard printer paper is .004 in/0.10 mm, archival tissue is half that and glassine is about half again thinner. I'm not suggesting you re-do this stripe, just something to keep in mind for use on another project or application. Edited to correct paper thickness.
  25. 1 point
    I like the second one!
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