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  2. DSiemens

    How to Build a Bermuda Sloop (for beginners)

    First one more set of back stays. Following the plans I drilled a hole in the bulwark. I then tied a line to the top mast about mid way down. I gave it a little glue so it doesn't move then ran the lines through the holes on the bulwarks. I then tied my temporary forestay on and set the rake angle. These back most back stays are the most important in setting the rake so the must be perfect. Once the rake is set I secured my temporary forests on the bowsprit with a tiny amount of glue. Enough its easy to pull off but also enough to hold the rake while I adjust my back stays. From there I pulled one backstay tight and tested the rake and strength of the forestay. Once all was secure I pulled the line out just a little, then put a little glue on the end going into the hole and pulled it back tight. Once the glue set I did the same on the other side. The glue holds the line in place while I tie a knot around the bulwarks. Once the know is secured I glue them down and cut off the ends. Once done in can take off the temporary line and prep the bowsprit for the fore stays.
  3. DSiemens

    How to Build a Bermuda Sloop (for beginners)

    For some of the next parts I'm going to use what called a thread block. John Fox III has created an excellent video demonstrating how this works. This thread block is part of how I get away with thinner, somewhat closer to scale masts and yards. The smaller the dowels get the harder it is to drill holes and the holes compromise the integrity of the mast and yards. Tying thread blocks creates places for lines to pass with out compromising the strength of the mast and yards.
  4. Today
  5. DSiemens

    How to Build a Bermuda Sloop (for beginners)

    To give a better idea on this style of rigging, the following link is where I first discovered it. Jim Goodwin shared it a long with a lot of other tricks on the PBS show the Woodwrights Shop. https://www.pbs.org/video/woodwrights-shop-ship-bottle/ Honestly the ship he demonstrates in this show maybe a better beginners model than this Bermuda Sloop.
  6. Yesterday
  7. Long time ago, when I was in the RN, when entering or leaving a port on special occasions, the upper deck was manned by the ships company wearing best bib and tucker. It was called Procedure Alpha. The Norwegians have taken this to new heights. Mast Manning I'm glad we did did away with sails. Alan
  8. DSiemens

    Our first Bottled Shipwright Journal

    Really excellent work on the journal. It felt like reading the old magazine. You had some really great quality content. I'm looking forward to the next one. I'll have to see if I can't get an article together to contribute.
  9. DSiemens

    La nina, caravel.

    Thats looking great. I love the barrels.
  10. James w rogers

    Our first Bottled Shipwright Journal

    Yes, well done, a great read and learnt a lot from it aswell! πŸ‘ πŸ‘ Nice to put some names and faces to people, nice personal touch. Can't wait to see the next one nowπŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒ, great to see the little girl doing well.
  11. Lboro

    La nina, caravel.

    Beautiful work!
  12. exwafoo

    Our first Bottled Shipwright Journal

    Well done! Alan
  13. James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Lateen sails made, to say it was a bit fiddly would be an understatement. I ended up putting two flats on the yards to enable me to glue them together and stop them rolling apart, then put some cotton binding round with a little dab of superglue, then tacked the sails in place with glue and sewed them on.
  14. James w rogers

    Working out scale.

    Thanks for that! It’s been driving me mad trying to work it out!πŸ‘πŸ‘
  15. Last week
  16. DSiemens

    Working out scale.

    I think you have it right. The technical scale is 1:319. A lot of people round that down because 1:300 is easier to remember. Either works. Technically 1:300 would be 50mm. The difference between 1:319 and 1:300 is almost a meter. I think it's safe to go with either. 15000 Γ· 300=50 50-47=3 3*300=900
  17. Hi guys, I need some advice on working out the scale size of my la nina build. If I have a length of 47 mm and the real ship is 15m would I be right to say 15000 Γ·47 = 319 1:319? Or just 1:300? Thanks for humouring me, maths was never my greatest subject! πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚
  18. DSiemens

    How to Build a Bermuda Sloop (for beginners)

    Time to get into the rigging. First thing I start with is the back stays. There's a lot of different methods for this. Use what ever method works best for you. This method has worked for me. Typically I create a channel specifically for the backstays and glue it onto the channel where the stays connect to the ship. Since I mismeasured a tad my ship is a little to wide for that. So I drilled my holes through the existing channels. When drilling these holes be careful not to make them to wide or to close together. They need to be wide enough for the thread but not much more. I'll explain why at the end. The backstays will be created using a single piece of thread. Pass the thread through through the channel and up through the gap in the two masts. Then done to the holes in the channel on the other side. The thread will pass down one hole and up the next. Then it will run up to the gap in the mast and down to the first channel. In this way the thread weaves back and for between the two channels and through the mast. Once you go through the last hole tie a stopping not, put a dab of glue on it and pull it into the channel. This is where the size of the holes and length between them matters. You can easily pull the thread out between the two holes if they are to close or the wood isn't strong enough. This is partially why I like having a separate glued on channel. If it breaks it can be cut off and remade. Its not so easy with the longer channel. It also looks more accurate. I tied two to make it thick enough and you can see I missed once. No worries that piece will be cut off. Once the stopper not is in place, pull on the other end of the string to tighten up the lines. Keep in mind that with the folding method the tension on the backstays will set the rake or angle of the mast. Tighten up the lines to get the right mast angle. Then on the loose end I put a little glue on the thread and pull it through the channel. This helps keep the tension right as I tie it off. Once the glue sets I tie a knot around the channel, glue it down and cut off the excess. This is the result. My thread is more frayed than I like but hopefully a little more wax will cure that. The forests thread is temporary for now. One more set of backstays will go up to the top mast but after that we move on to the fore stays.
  19. Ahoy maties! Our first journal is out. Please hit the clubs tab to find it. If you haven't signed up please join our club. The journal is free of charge and all that I ask is that you sign up so I can track our readership! Please enjoy our first journal. Jeff
  20. Ladies and Gentlemen, attached is our first edition! Enjoy...Jeff The Bottled Shipwright.pdf
  21. John Fox III

    Gypsy Moth IV

    Well done indeed! Love that you are showing the entire hull too!! Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  22. John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Thanks Omni and Bernard! It was a struggle, tried various papers and thread colors before I found what worked. Glad you both think the effort was worth it. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  23. Bernard Kelly

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    As someone who has always struggled with sails they really impress me. A great idea and well worth the time and effort. Brilliant as ever John. Bernard
  24. Onni

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    That's some beautiful looking sails you have made John. The time and effort you have put into them has all been worthwhile.
  25. Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Not yet! I've have been seeing them searching for "Rigging a Bermuda Sloop."
  26. Jeff B

    Jeff bs build #3.

    Means a lot to me coming from you. I've made some big mistakes, but I'm not gonna be pointing them out to the landlubbers looking at my ships on the shelf that wouldn't even notice.
  27. James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Decided to paint it with acrylic so it wouldn't be too glossy and mask the grain of the wood too much. Had used gloss enamel on it previously but it didn't look right so stripped it off. Now I need to rig it!
  28. John Fox III

    James Miller 3 masted schooner

    Greetings All, In my attempt to get realism I have been working on some ideas for sails. Rather than printing seam lines on paper, my usual method for making sails, I tried out the idea of using thread sandwiched between layers of very thin paper. It took a number of attempts, using different threads and various papers, until I came up with something I think works quite well. The photos below show first one of the hulls with the stern bulwarks added, with the boat davits, and painted black along with the top of the cap rail. Then for the sails, there are several shots showing my sail jig, with bamboo pins spaced where I want my seam lines to be, then strung with 8/0 white fly tying thread. I kept the thread under some tension, while stringing the jig. Beneath the threads is first a small sheet of .003" thick clear acetate, then a folded sheet of .003" 100% cotton drafting paper, with half the paper under the threads. I found it easier to add threads to the jib after the layer of acetate and paper, rather than slipping them under the threads. I then thinned down PVA white glue with water, and using a soft paint brush I laid down a thin layer of glue over nearly the entire paper, leaving 1/4" unglued near the outside edges. The paper warped a bit, and I had to be careful as the wet threads stretched a little, too much brushing moved them around and out of place. I then folded the other half of the paper over the first half, pressed it down by hand, then added another acetate sheet and finally a couple of "C" clamps to hold it all together. Over several attempts I found that too much clamp pressure flattened it all to the point where the ever so slight height difference over the threads completely disappeared, which ruined the effect. I finally found just the right clamping pressure to get the desired results. The last few photos show some completed sails, not easy to detect the seam lines on those, but the later photos show some of the sails installed, and the running rigging added, and here the seam lines seem just right to me. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox iII
  29. James w rogers

    La nina, caravel.

    Time to make the deck fixtures and fittings. Turned a cocktail stick in my rotary tool to make the cargo barrels and deck hatch out of some thin cardboard.
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