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  1. Today
  2. Thanks Micky, my sentiments exactly! Along those lines, I spoke with my helmsman and he said he was tired of getting splinters in his hands and a sore back from horsing around that old-fashion tiller, so I upgraded the helm to a more convenient to operate ship's wheel - although it only has five spokes. (I fashioned it out of an old watch gear I had in my box-o-junk and some brass wire for handles). I suppose the original Harvey could have had a tiller and the "desk" in front of it seems consistent with a tiller arrangement but I had to turn the "desk" around and make a wheel box out of it. I finished making the lower dead-eyes and chain plates and mounted them in "double channel" fashion. I turned the dead eyes out of 3/16 dowels (its what I have the most of) and gave them some walnut stain for an antiqued look. I also got a start on the foremast which will be in the paint shop soon.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Spanky

    Mayflower

    One step forward, two steps back. Made what I thought was a binnacle on the plans, until I realized they were not yet invented during the reign of the Mayflower. I also broke the rails on the upper deck so I will leave that for a little later. I managed a capstan, some stairs and a bit more grating.
  5. AndrewH

    Mayflower

    Beautiful clean detail, Spanky Wonder how a poor matelot gets up to the Forecastle? There might be some rungs on the first post with a section of the bow that might be rungs for climbing andrew
  6. AndrewH

    CSS Alabama

    Sorry to be so late in replying. The Swedish site is a good read, and there is an option to see it in Swedish or English before discovering the toggle, which for me is in the bottom of the page on the left, I had learned/deduced some useful Swedish maritime words Lovely build, Onni, and thanks for the warts-and-all basis. It gives me heart to proceed and maybe air my efforts. andrew
  7. Hi Lubber, The detail on your ship is incredible, I love it! And, at the end of the day, it's your ship, and if it differs from the original, just say that it went in for a re-fit when you became Captain! Cheers Mick
  8. Last week
  9. Thanks Jim! I would have preferred that I knew what ship it was supposed to be before I started building it. However, now that I know I'm seeing so many variations on other models I don't know what is supposed to be accurate. I'm using the model as a practice exercise. I have had to manufacture many of my own parts which I haven't done before so that's slow going with a lot of trial and error. The model won't look as polished as an accurate scale kit build will but as I progress it is kind of endearing its self in me.
  10. Caleb

    Mayflower

    Nice work. The good contrast of colours makes everything stand out well.
  11. Looking great, really well done!­čśÄ
  12. I like it a lot, great details, I prefer the been to sea look!­čśÄ
  13. Onni

    Mayflower

    Nice details Spanky. Looks great.
  14. Thank you Spanky for the kind words. May God richly bless you and yours, especially your Mom! ­čśç Chass
  15. Very, very nice. It's so humbling, yet inspiring to check out how awesome some of these builds are, including the skill and talent needed to get there. After perusing your build I've found myself whistling O' Canada. My Mother is Canadian and my son plays hockey. Must have been the coin you used for scale.
  16. Spanky

    Mayflower

    Made some grating, doors into the forecastle and ladder steps down it's front.
  17. I use https://smallseotools.com/image-to-text-converter/ its an online free tool. Then use google translate. Alan
  18. I'm just about done with the deck details. I included as many upgrades, embellishments, improvements and details (also mistakes) as I dared. I had some materials left over from two other models that I put to use. I early abandoned all hope of historical accuracy and the scale of the model is too small for true accuracy so I decided to make the model "my own": I upgraded the cannon barrels and carriages and lashed them down; I included two swivel guns in the aft; I fashioned cannon balls from pin heads and mounted them into the ball racks; I made belaying pins from brass wire (I also had some left-overs); I made jackstay eyebolts from brass wire and put the rings in the ring boxes; I found some chain for the anchors and I improved the bowsprit construction. I am most particularly proud of the 21 ft ship's boat that I fashioned out of scrap planking and made a mini planked-up boat out of. This was my first attempt at trying to do this and I planked the boat onto a false frame that I then later chiseled out. I decided to go with the "ship that's been to sea look" than the "ship that came right out of the ship yard" look so somethings look ragged, worn, rusted and damaged (at least that's my excuse!). I'm finishing the bowsprit rigging now. I also fashioned some deadeyes from 3/16" dowel (maybe not the right scale) and mounted them on brass wire chain plates and decided on a "double channel" mounting for them because they would be too difficult to rig if I mounted them against the side boards. On to the foremast next!
  19. A hoy! I have been working on the masts, yards and ratlines. I bought some fly tying silk and it is very fine. However it is not a single strand, but multiple ultrafine threads laid up together. They are not braided together, which means they easily fray and seperate. But I'm reasonably happy with the results I've got for the ratlines. Shroud lines are standard sowing thread. I set the shrouds up with the correct number of strands and angle, then overlaid the silk ratlines. With tape holding everything in place I dabbed super glue all over it, then absorbed/wiped up the excess glue. Following Onni's advice, I will fix the shroud lines to the mast now, and then glue the base of them to the hull sides later. I made each side of the shrouds on the same strands. This allows me to simply fold the shrouds in half and tie to the mast under the platforms. I've noticed a lot of folks drill holes in their masts and yards to pass rigging through, however it sometimes requires larger mast/yard diameters to allow a through hole. I've chosen to try and keep the mast diameters small, and taper my yards in an attempt to be scale. It means I can't drill through them, I've tried to no success with a no.75 drill. So I'll have to come up with another solution for running rigging between the yard tips, I think it will involve thread blocks. I've experimented with yard braces. It works well I think. There is a small thread block tied to the mast and the yard braces passes through it. When the yard is pivoted to be parallel with the mast (for bottle entry) the line goes slack. When the yard is then pivoted to perpendicular the line goes back to tight. Convenient geometry of triangles and pivot points. My latest problem is how to make the rear cabins. I need to build them up because I haven't carved them out. For shaping the actual windows I can't cut timber panels accurately enough, nor does the grain of the wood allow it. So I have experimented with two methods of creating windows: One is to stamp the shape. So I made a little metal punch to stamp the shape of the window onto a piece of wood that I can then glue to the sides and back. The second is to try and imprint the shape of the windows onto a piece of wood. I bent some tin to shape and sharpened its edges. A light tap imprints the profile. Neither of these methods produce amazing results but it's better than nothing. Does anyone have a way of reliably repeating the exact same cabin window shape? My next major tasks are to work on the prow detail and stairs on the deck. Hope you're all staying safe. Regards, Caleb.
  20. I have a s-I-b kit I got from Ebay about 2 years ago and the instruction booklet is in German. Is there a program available that will let me scan in the pages and then convert them to English. Thanks for any help.
  21. Greetings All, Continuing on with my paper mache hull saga, I removed the planked paper hull from the plug. This was done by carefully slipping the tip of a #11 exacto blade between the plug and paper and tracing around the plug edge. At first I just barely inserted the blade tip, careful to follow the angle of the hull while inserting. Later I made my cuts a little deeper, where possible, the curvature of the hull at the edge near the stern is too sharp to allow much depth. The stern was reinforced with the wooden piece, in that area I used a flat chisel made from a piece of razor blade secured into the end of a piece of 1/8" brass tubing. The chisel was inserted between paper and plug, and pushed down as far as the hull shape would allow. I then used the chisel as a lever to slowly lift the stern area to remove the plug from the hull. The first photo shows the hull at this point. The second photo shows the result of cutting out the drop keel opening in the paper and inserting a piece of 1/32nd maple veneer, this was used to hold the hull during further work. Next step was to make in interior keel piece, made similarly to the method for the outer keel. The next 3 photos show what this looked like, with the caveat that after making the piece I decided to go with one made from pieces of cedar wood, which was the next photo. The interior keel was cut out in the main cockpit area and just after of the bow area, leaving the rest at bulwarks level for the keel well. The cockpit area was cut away to the level of the bottom of the deck and grating level. See how I made the grating in an earlier post in Odds and Ends.The maple piece used to hold the hull was used to align the interior keel piece by inserting the maple holder piece through the hull and interior keel. The interior keel was then glued in place. Anchor's A Weigh! John Fox III
  22. Hi Caleb, the handrails are photo-etched parts I purchased online from a chap in the UK. The rails are painted with a white enamel paint thinned with mineral spirits. Chass
  23. Those white hand rails up the front are fantastic! Do you mind sharing how you achieved them please?
  24. Earlier
  25. Thank-you, James and Jesse for the kind words. The sails are made from a heavy watercolor paper. I scribe the details in with a mechanical pencil and detail with watercolor pigment! Chass
  26. Back to it after a bit of a break. Anyway, hope you're all OK? Given the current situation. Finally tackled the job I've been putting for ages as I was hoping to find something for the overhanging grated deck, but alas nothing suitable came about, so I'm having to try and make it from scratch with a very small drill bit in my dremel. Not going to look to scale but hopefully won't stand out to much! The Hull, so far, is already cut in half and dowelled and sitting on its locating plug which will be set into the sea.
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