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Bottled Ship Builder

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  4. Onni

    HMS Terror

    Yep, took this photo on the 17th May. Okay, its been dumped there by a snow plough but I'm sure Igor in Russia is still building snowmen! 😂
  5. Jeff B

    HMS Terror

    Nicely done. Snow in May????
  6. IgorSky

    HMS Terror

    Well done, Onni! My congrats!
  7. Onni

    HMS Terror

    Fixed the bowsprit in place ,complete with dolphin striker and bobstays and then threaded the jib ropes through the bowsprit using the cotton loops that I had made earlier (first picture).Glued the jib sails in place and after everything was dry cut off any excess threads and she's done! Turks head knot on the end of the bottle completes the look. Had to photograph her in the last little bit of snow that was left remaining in May!⛄
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  9. I knew a builder once that built ships first and found bottles after. It was kind of funny but it worked for him and his sibs were really nice. Great work on this one.
  10. HMS Waterwitch is done. Just need a proper bottle. I used the plans/ instructions in Jack Needham's Modeling Ships In Bottles.
  11. I ran into that with this model. I used the next channel in. If that doesnt work drill through the side of the hull to the bottom of the hull and run the lines underneath.
  12. Onni

    HMS Terror

    Before I permanently fix the foremast in place, I position lifeboat davits on the port side complete with hanging lifeboat and add some more deck features. Next will be fixing the jib. The advantage for me in adding each mast separately is you don't have to deal with a vast amount of tangled threads as one usually has with the traditional folding masts. Not saying this is a better way of doing them but it works alright for me. Most of my earlier ships I built with folding masts,copied from 'Sailing in Glass' and Jack Needham's book but found the hulls were a bit on the small side ,so I began experimenting with split hulls and individual masts too allow bigger vessels. Still learning though ..... use a lot of styrene in builds nowadays because it is so versatile and easy to cut and use instead of thin wood veneers.
  13. Thanks BK. Never thought of that with jelly . Can't sand though .
  14. Earlier
  15. I once had that problem but if they are not too tight, and well over size, you can wipe them with a little vaseline petroleum jelly. A cotton bud on a wire will clean up any residue after and any on the bottle. If you have space on the channels themselves you could sand them down a little and then touch them up with paint.
  16. The channels on my model are too wids to enter the bottle. I have thought of different ways to get the channels in. What is your recomendation?
  17. As I have been posting, I have been collecting ship in the bottle kits lately. Most of these escaped me in my youth since they came during my hiatus from modeling. At a certain age, one’s interests mature and things of youth are left behind. It takes a certain amount of curiosity to become interested in the less superficial aspects of modeling and requires a certain maturity to appreciate historical significance and fine craftsmanship. I’ve encountered a variety of different compositions of these kits. All the ones I’ve reported on so far are some variation of materials to be placed inside a glass bottle. The tradition of the activity has been building a model from wood and placing it inside a glass bottle with a sea made of putty since these are the materials that a person at sea may have had available to the them. To make the activity more accessible to the common person, lately more modern materials have been incorporated and some techniques have been improved and modified. Our seafaring predecessors may have appreciated some of these materials, such as CA “super glue” and tools such as small spiral drills and pin vises - not to mention accurate plans. And maybe they would have been repulsed by some other ideas. I like to stay as close to a traditional build as possible, but I do appreciate some modern conveniences such as my tiny drill bits and CA. This kit deviates from the tradition in that it is a plastic model of a ship to be placed into a glass bottle. It actually has a very nice glass bottle and a neat little stand for it. The introduction on the instruction sheet states: “In this kit, modern methods and materials have been used to allow you to re-create this fascinating craft and learn age-old skills. None of the original ingenuity has been lost!” But in reality I’m gluing together a pre-fabricated plastic hull and parts to be placed inside a glass bottle. How much ingenuity is that? So here I present the kit made by Airfix (Humbrol limited) “Cutty Sark” # 6003. There were also two other kits in this series: the “Mayflower” and “Charles W. Morgan”. These are all well know historical ships with the “Cutty Sark” and the “C.W.Morgan” still preserved for observation so there should be some expectation of detailed accuracy. The kit is well presented in very nice packaging and a very elaborate instruction sheet with various language interpretations. But it contains no historical information about the ship. My first impression when I received the box was how large the kit is. The box measures 12”x 14.5”. The kit contains a very nice large rectangular flask type bottle that measures 8.5” x 4.5” (from the tip of the neck). The neck opening is so large I can put my thumb into it. Also included is the only wooden part, a nice stand to place the bottle on complete with plastic whale carvings. A long with the plastic parts for the hull, masts and spars and a sheet of plasticized paper sails are a set of paints with small brush, tubes of glue for paper and plastic, rigging thread and cordage for neck decoration, a metal tool for model insertion and a cork for the neck - and of course the completely hardened by now white and blue modeling clay. There is also a plastic rigging stand that doesn’t look like it could be repurposed for use with a wooden model. Also included are little plastic dolphins and a small light house for embellishments to be placed in the putty sea. One of the reasons I bought this kit was for my preparation to build a “Cutty Sark” model which is the final model in the Jack Needham book. I didn’t have a bottle large enough for his dimensions and I wanted a sail plan. So my initial plan is to repurpose the bottle and some materials perhaps to build a wooden model using the dimensions from the plastic one and repurpose the sails. It just seems like a shame to put a plastic ship into such a nice bottle. I haven’t built a plastic model since my pre-teen years and I wasn’t that enthusiastic about it then. I think it does require some sophistication to build a convincing plastic model and that it is a legitimate modeling hobby but it strays a bit far from the tradition of putting a ship in a bottle. But the kit is a nice kit for what it is.
  18. James w rogers

    HMS Terror

    That's looking really great, I think the size looks really good aswell. 😁
  19. Onni

    HMS Terror

    Main mast goes in.Because this is a bigger bottle than I originally intended to use,she looks a bit on the small size but it would of entailed an almost complete rebuild or at least reworking the masts to be higher. At least there is good space to work inside the bottle and I can fill out the empty ice pack with tents/huts/stores etc..
  20. aadkitta

    HMS Terror

    Fantastic work so far. Thank you for sharing.
  21. Onni

    HMS Terror

    Mizzen mast in place complete with spanker sail. Ship's double wheel is under the spanker but a little difficult to make out. Lifeboat hoist in front of the mizzen mast. I decided to make a weather beaten canvas awning,with the date and name of the ship incorporated into the stand. I think some of the fun of building ship in bottles, is coming up with your own unique stand designs.
  22. I'm sorry it didn't work out for you, but we all have to start somewhere. I'm glad you kept it; I like looking back on early work and reflecting on how I could improve. Most of these higher quality kits either weren't around yet or were out of reach for me in my youth. It's better to have tried and failed then to never had tried at all - unless you really need the money for something more important!
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